A Lot of “Spin” in Studies of Using Antidepressants for Treating Anxiety

There are a lot of publication and reporting biases in studies of the efficacy of second-generation antidepressants for the treatment of anxiety, according to a study in JAMA Psychiatry. More →

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Have We Found The “Overhype Gene”?

In Scientific American, John Horgan criticizes psychiatrist Richard Friedman's effusive portrayal in the New York Times of a study that allegedly identified the "feel-good" gene in humans. More →

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How Come the Word “Antipsychiatry” is so Challenging?

So here we go again; another meeting with another young person who describes how he is in an acute crisis – you may call it – and is diagnosed and prescribed neuroleptics. He is told by the doctor that he suffers from a life-long illness and he will from now on be dependent on his “medication.” As long as people are met this way I see no alternative than showing that there are alternatives. If that means being “antipsychiatry,” then I am more than happy to define myself and our work in that way.
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“Is being a worrier a sign of intelligence?”

The British Psychological Society's Research Digest examines a recent study that found that certain higher ratings of intelligence in people seemed to be correlated with higher ratings of anxiety and rumination as well. More →

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Probiotics and Prebiotics May Ease Anxiety and Depression

The ingestion of prebiotics that feed good bacteria in the human gut shows promise as a way to help alleviate anxiety and depression, according to a University of Oxford study in Psychopharmacology. The study adds to previous research showing that probiotics, which add good bacteria to the gut, can also have beneficial psychological effects, the researchers said. More →

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“Unexpected Advantages of Anxiety”

PsyBlog discusses various studies that show "unexpected advantages" to having somewhat higher levels of anxiety. Many people feel that those who are more easily embarrassed are actually more trustworthy, and anxiety seems to be associated with better memories and fewer fatal accidents. More →

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Canadian Study: Most Mental Disorder Symptoms Declining in Youth

Data from a series of large, national longitudinal surveys show that symptoms of most mental illnesses in Canadian youth have in fact been stable or declining since 1994, according to a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. So why does the opposite seem to be occurring, asked the authors. More →

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Are Psychiatric Experiments on Primates Ethical — Or Even Truly Useful?

Pediatric psychiatrist Sujartha Ramakrishna describes a planned University of Wisconsin psychiatric experiment "to discover new therapies by dissecting and analyzing the brains of baby monkeys who have been intentionally traumatized." Is such an experiment ethical, Ramakrishna asks in The Cap Times -- and can it possibly lead to anything truly helpful? More →

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Video Games By Prescription Continue Developing

"Is this the future of medicine?" asks Stephen Armstrong in the British Medical Journal. "Little Artie has been left at the doorstep of his grandma’s house—a spooky mansion filled with shadows. His grandma has been taken, and only he can save her. As he moves through corridors and darkened rooms, terrifying shapes loom above him. His only friend is Teru the Magical Hat, who shines more brightly the calmer Artie becomes. If Artie panics, however, Teru dims and the darkness grows." More →

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Mindfulness “Potent” in Preventing Relapses in Chronic Depression

Two psychologists writing for Scientific American Mind review some of the evidence base for the impacts of mindfulness meditation on problematic psychological states. They conclude that the ancient techniques "hold promise as remedies for depression and possibly anxiety" and are actually "potent" in preventing relapses in the chronically depressed. More →

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Unpublished Trials Reveal Antidepressant Provides Little Benefit For Depression or Anxiety

Upon reviewing all of GlaxoSmithKline's data from both published and unpublished trials of the antidepressant paroxetine, researchers found the drug provided almost no benefits over placebo for either depression or anxiety, according to a study in PLOS One. More →

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Nontreatment Better than CBT for Childhood Anxiety?

Children who received no treatment for their diagnosed anxiety disorder faired better over the long term than did those who chose to take Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), according to a study in Brain and Behavior. In addition, regardless of being treated or not, about half of the people in both groups were generally fairing better at the time of the long-term follow-up. More →

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Gut Bacteria Can Influence Health and Moods

Bacteria in the human gut influence food cravings, diseases and moods, according to a review of current scientific evidence published in BioEssays. In a press release, researchers from UC San Francisco, Arizona State University and University of New Mexico stated that "microbes influence human eating behavior and dietary choices to favor consumption of the particular nutrients they grow best on." The researchers focused mainly on evidence that gut bacteria can influence food choices and physical diseases, but also cited studies showing impacts on moods such as irritability and anxiety. More →

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Depth-Motion Study Shows Exercise Changes How Anxious People See

Physical exercise and a yogic technique of progressive muscle tensing and relaxing have the power to alter people's visual perceptions on a classic anxiety test, according to a study in PLOS One. Previous research has shown that people who are feeling socially anxious perceive point-light displays of ambiguous human figures as facing threateningly towards them more often than facing away. The study by Adam Heenan, a Queen's University PhD candidate in psychology, found that people regarded these figures as less threatening after brief engagement in exercise or muscle relaxation. More →

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Bullying Affects Mental and Physical Health Long-Term

Researchers from Boston Children's Hospital analyzed data from 4297 children surveyed over 3 time points (fifth, seventh and tenth grades) to find that bullying is associated with worse mental and physical health.  The article, published this week in Pediatrics, showed that bullying, especially when chronic, resulted in greater depression, anger and anxiety, and lower self-worth.

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Kelly McGonigal: How to Make Stress Your Friend

This TED Talk sheds new light on stress. "... While stress has been made into a public health enemy, new research suggests that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Psychologist Kelly McGonigal urges us to see stress as a positive, and introduces us to an unsung mechanism for stress reduction: reaching out to others."

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Traumagenic Neurodevelopmental Model of Psychosis — Revisited

The traumagenic neurodevelopment model of psychosis, introduced in 2001, highlighted similarities between brain abnormalities found both in people who have been abused and those who are diagnosed with schizophrenia - at the time a radical shift in thinking.  This article in Neuropsychiatry by John Read, Roar Fosse, Andrew Moskowitz, and Bruce Perry reviews the research findings since then, and finds that both direct and indirect support for the model has grown.

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Fluoxetine in Adolescence Raises Sensitivity to Stress in Adults

Research on neurochemicals associated with moods in mice and rats finds that, while less depression-like behavior was observed in those receiving fluoxetine (Prozac) administration in adolescence (compared to those receiving a placebo), sensitivity to anxiety was more pronounced in adulthood. The study, appearing in the Journal of Neuroscience, shows "the complexity of drug and intracellular manipulations in the immature brain," according to the authors.

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How to Escape Psychiatry as a Teen: Interview with a Survivor

When I lived in Massachusetts I taught yoga and led writing groups for alternative mental health communities. While the organizations I worked for were alternative, many of the students and participants were heavily drugged with psychiatric pharmaceuticals. There was one skinny teenager I’d never have forgotten who listed the drugs he was on for me once in the yoga room after class: a long list of stimulants, neuroleptics, moods stabilizers; far too many drugs and classes of drugs to remember. I was at the housewarming party of an old friend, and who should walk in but that boy who used to come to my yoga classes and writing groups religiously. And he was no longer a boy; he was now a young man. “I’m thinking yoga teacher,” he said. I nodded. Did he remember where? “I’m not stupid,” he said, as if reading my mind. “I’m not on drugs anymore. I’m not stupid anymore.”
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“America’s Foster Care System: Test Lab For Big Pharma, Cash Cow For Caretakers?”

MintPress reports that over half of America's foster children are on some form of psychiatric medication, and tells the story of some for whom the medication was an inappropriate response to understandable emotions.

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Winners of the American Dream

Since I left the psychiatric prescribing trenches and came south for the winter, I’ve been staying in a beach town within driving distance of a technology metropolis. I take breaks from my writing and walk to the beach. There, I meet and talk with the winners of the American dream. They are intelligent, highly educated and financially successful. They take their beach vacations here.
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Excessive Mood & Behavior Arousal in Juveniles Treated with Antidepressants

In a study of 6,767 reports of antidepressant trials in juveniles treated for depressive and anxiety disorders, the risk of psychopathological behavioral or mood elevation was 3.5x greater with antidepressants than with placebo. The authors (which include Giovanni Fava of …
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Whether Bullied or Bullying: Increased Psychiatric Disorders

A North Carolina study of 1,420 participants finds higher rates of agoraphobia (4.6x), generalized anxiety disorder (2.7x), and panic disorder (3.1x) among victims of bullying. Among those who had been both bullies and victims, the study found higher rates of …
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Harvard Psychologist Critiques Psychiatry

Eminent developmental psychologist Jerome Kagan, in an interview with Spiegel, accuses the mental-health establishment and pharmaceutical companies of incorrectly classifying millions as mentally ill out of self-interest and greed. "That is the history of humanity: Those in authority believe they're doing the right thing, and they harm those who have no power," Kagan says.

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Prenatal Prozac Alters Stress Response in Male Rats

Researchers from Belgium and the Netherlands, publishing online June 20 in Neuroscience, found that prenatal fluoxetine (Prozac) differentially affected the development of glucocorticoid receptors in male (but not female) rats. This response to SSRI medications "may differentially alter the capacity of the hippocampus to respond to stress."

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