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Want to Be Drug Free? 
It’s Time to Live More Simply

Creeping from the shadows, emerging from the glen, is a cry for an existence much better than the one we’re living in. It is clear that drugs are becoming our crutch, an excuse to avoid experiencing the trials and tribulations as such. So below is an entreaty to return to simplicity, one in which much of what we need is available so readily.
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Re-telling Our Stories: Liberation or Re-oppression?

The Wall Street Journal reports on two recent studies that found that people who "narrate" their own lives to put a positive spin on them feel better overall. But a paper in Intersectionalities explores how re-narrating one's own sense of personal identity may either help free one from oppression or become a mere expression of one's oppression. More →

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“Pharmed Out” Conference 2015

Georgetown University in Washington, DC, will host the next "Pharmed Out" conference on June 11-12, 2015. This year's theme is, "The Real Risks of Rx Drugs." More →

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Common Air Pollutant Linked to Cognitive and Behavioral Impairments

Researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and Columbia University found a "powerful" dose-response relationship between young children's exposures to a common air pollutant, measurable brain disturbances, and cognitive and behavioral problems. The study appeared in JAMA Psychiatry. More →

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How Can Anyone Possibly Not Be Taking Abilify Anymore?

After she researched the drugs on her own, in RxISK Johanna Ryan writes about her long, complex, creative and persistent efforts to avoid following psychiatrists' pressures to take antipsychotics for her depression. More →

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All Therapies Equal, “Therapeutic Alliance” Makes the Difference

Cognitive behavioral therapy, routine care and supportive counseling are all equally helpful -- or harmful -- to patients experiencing schizophrenia or psychosis, depending on the quality of the relationship that the patient feels he or she has with the treatment provider, according to a study in Psychological Medicine. More →

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“Adventures in Transcranial Direct-current Stimulation”

Elif Batuman reviews the science and recounts his experiences with transcranial direct-current stimulation in The New Yorker. More →

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Squirming May Be Helping Kids with ADHD to Learn

Normal efforts to get children with ADHD to "sit still and focus" may be counterproductive, according to a study in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. A team of Florida researchers found that children with ADHD actually have better working memory when they are "squirming" in their seats. More →

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How Blaming the Brain Can Help Create Self-empathy, New Approaches

In Schizophrenia Bulletin, Amy Johnson writes about how neuroscientific perspectives on her brain and psychological struggles have helped her feel more agency in her growth as a person. More →

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BBC “All in the Mind” Podcast Resumes

The BBC's "All in the Mind" podcast has resumed, releasing another eight episodes every week. Psychologist Claudia Hammond discusses various themes such as what psychology can tell us about the influences on how we decide to vote, portrayals of mental health in comedy, and whether we can improve our ability to have insights. More →

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