Friday, January 21, 2022

Getting across a message of human rights?

Home Forums Rethinking Psychiatry Getting across a message of human rights?

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  • #17978
    Laura Delano
    Keymaster

    How do we help our broader communities and society at large understand the issues talked about here at Mad in America through a lens of human rights and civil rights?

    #18036
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Survivors must painstakingly explain the pain, destruction and degradation that forced psychiatry policy causes, much like square one in abolition of slavery. People need to come to be immediately repulsed of the nuclear level degradation and unnessary risks taken with innocent people’s bodies, when they think of forced drugging.

    Forced drugging should repulse people as much as forced sex or labor.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    #18049
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I would love to find ways to get the media interested. There are stories here – a lot of stories.

    #18074
    S.A.
    Participant

    People have to know that what happens to us is assault and violence, that it’s degrading and brutal and causes much suffering and anguish.  For some reason, they simply assume that anything that happens to mental patients is justified, and that once we are properly “treated”, we will be grateful.  We have to somehow get across the message that no human being, no matter how disturbed or disturbing, deserves to be stripped of their clothes, locked in a room alone all night, injected with drugs, etc., and that such behaviour on the part of the state or medical authorities is unacceptable.  Now, when you mention those kinds of experiences, the response is invariably, “But the person was so out of control/ill/etc. that they needed to be treated that way.”

    This means really revealing how it feels to be drugged into oblivion with major tranquillizers, left on a locked ward, hauled in places by police, given damning life-long diagnoses, etc.  People have to be hit where it matters – in the heart.  None of which is easy to do in our current climate.  Because the public doesn’t seem to want to empathize with mental patients one bit – except the compliant ones who are the mouthpieces of the system, arguing for more forced treatment, and so-called “anti-stigma” campaigns that produce the exact opposite result.

    I suspect we also have to relate this to campaigns such as MindFreedom’s “I Got Better”, and show the world that we can thrive outside of psychiatry.  Because otherwise there will always be that “But if it helped them, it’s justified” reasoning.  People will point to those who haven’t managed to get off the drugs, and hold them up as examples of how all the psychiatrically labeled “need” their so-called “meds”.

    Unfortunately, what it also means is that those of us who have moved on with our lives have to somehow get our stories out without suffering consequences in discrimination at work, and so on.  So I would suggest that we take examples of successful individuals who have been off the drugs over a very long period of time (8+ years, perhaps), who are in effect “bulletproof” at this point in life.

    #18079
    S.A.
    Participant

    The message could be – “This could happen to anyone.”  Anyone in a rough period of life, gets stuck in the wrong place and the wrong time, with the wrong supports, and voila, mental patient for years.  Then they find their own inner strength, grow, and move on with their lives.  Instead of viewing people who’ve been sucked into psychiatry as the mentally ill, as a separate category, people would have to start seeing us as individuals who went through a traumatic and disempowering experience, the experience of being a mental patient.  Somehow we have to separate out that experience from the current rhetoric that regards us as “people with mental disorders”, as if “having” a “mental disorder” was a solid fact, when it’s really a social judgment.

    This is all tied up in truth claims, and the often unquestioned authority of the agents that supposedly speak on behalf of certain groups and interests.

    #18080
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Right now, I feel frustrated. I am so ready to do something to oppose the system, but I feel that this movement is so disorganized, a bunch of individual voices with little action. One thing is clear to me, if we do not find a way to get organized and work together absolutely nothing will happen.

    It was through unity and non violence that other human rights organizations got through. Whether the womens lib movement, equality for black people, or the ongoing fight for equality for gays, there was organization, vision and a coming together. We are doing none of that. Do we need a leader? Is that the problem, that we do not really have someone to lead the rally?I wish there was a Martin Luther King for us right about now.

    We need to put energy in to this – energy well beyond talking on some message boards. Anyone wants to discuss what and how we can do it in person? My email address is malene.comes at gmail dot com. Send me an email, I will be happy to give out my phone number as well.

    The more people and professionals / professions get together the more effective we can be.

    We need to work legally.
    We need to work politically
    We need to establish solid alternatives
    We need to work with the media
    We need to work getting information out to the public.
    We need to get out there and stand up for ourselves and each other.

    There is so much to do, and just a few people working individually to improve things.

    Come on guys, LET’s GET TO WORK.

    Malene

    #18084
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    We could certainly be more organized, but it’s not as if there’s nothing going on. Here’s just a few things I’m aware of:

    People are preparing to protest on October 6 at the American Psychiatric Association’s conference in New York City. https://www.facebook.com/events/417279764959510/

    There’s a flurry of great conferences in the next few months related to our issues – see http://www.mindfreedom.org/events_sf

    Here in Oregon, the Oregon Consumer/Survivor Coalition is gearing up to have some input in the state’s next legislative sessions. MindFreedom is in the process of hiring someone to kick organizing up a notch in the state.

    If you’re looking for people to organize with, check out MindFreedom’s list of affiliates and sponsors – http://www.mindfreedom.org/as/mfi-sponsor-affiliate-public-list (over 100, in the U.S. and around the world).

    I’m relatively new to all this – please add more resources for finding people to organize with!

    Life,
    John

    #18085
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    “How do we help our broader communities and society at large understand the issues talked about here at Mad in America through a lens of human rights and civil rights?”

    It requires the official procedure of overturning these wrongful, damning, condemning convictions.

    It requires admission on the floors of the psyche wards and on the political stages and among the new world webpages that psychiatry IS incompetent, injurious, detrimental and liable.

    It requires distinguishing between those who are TRUE SPIRITS and those who are not.

    It requires an admission that abuse and neglect and violence and trauma and poverty are societal and cultural, and that the state of the nation has much to do with the suffering of it’s individual people.

    It requires absolute GOOD-WILL from all.

    #18086
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    P.S.

    If you can add to the list, please do.  Please keep it going until the SENTENCE is finally rendered.

    Thank you.

    #18224
    David Bates
    Participant

    “Survivors must painstakingly explain the pain, destruction and degradation that forced psychiatry policy causes, much like square one in abolition of slavery.”

    In online  forums such as facebook’s pro-medication & pro-psychiatry, groups there is the perfect opportunity to get the message across? Yet what happens when any of us try to do this, even within a group which has fist-hand experience of hospitalization.

    Why do we not talk about addressing this obvious avenue, for getting the message out?  Can we address this issue here?

    #18240
    Faith Rhyne
    Participant

    “Right now, I feel frustrated. I am so ready to do something to oppose the system, but I feel that this movement is so disorganized, a bunch of individual voices with little action. One thing is clear to me, if we do not find a way to get organized and work together absolutely nothing will happen.”

    The bottomline issue of human rights is increasingly become a focus in a lot of dialogues. Here’s a rough-draft write-up (nothing written in stone) about a rally for human rights in psychiatry and a protest against forced/coercive treatment. This is happening on October 6th, in NYC.

    “On October 6th, 2012, in New York City, supporters of human rights in psychiatry will gather for a  protest against forced and coercive psychiatric care.  This rally involves some of the most influential voices in the psychiatric survivors movement and those working to enact protective legislation.

    Tina Minkowitz, a lawyer, psychiatric survivor and director of the Center for Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry (CHRUSP), plans to speak on the important fact that forced mental health treatment contravenes the CRPD (full name)  and, as (UN rappoteur) states (akin to torture quote)

    Organizations such as MindFreedom International, PsychRights, as well as a number of grassroots activism collectives will be speaking out against gross violations of human rights that occur in the course of, as explained by a MindFreedom member who plans to attend the protest, “reckless treatment and false-science that assumes the right to impose dangerously coercive biomedical and often-deadly forceful behavioral intervention upon the lives of people with presumed and real disabilities. In many cases, people become disabled in the course of their psychiatric treatment, because of the abusive and physically harmful of nature of these treatments.”

    Some quote about deaths? In the United States: (some stunning statistics about how terrible it all is). Daniel Hazen, director of Voices of the Heart, a peer-respite house in Albany and a primary organizer of the event says, (“some quote”)

    At 12:00 pm, protestors will gather across the street from the United Nations, where survivors and activists will tell their stories of human rights abuses and speak on the need for stronger oversights in policy and the funding of appropriate alternatives in provision of care. In addition to these causes, protestors will be demanding that the psychiatric and pharmaceutical industry be held accountable for human rights abuses and the loss and damages incurred in people’s lives.

    Following this rally,  protestors plan to march to (57th and 3rd) the site of an American Psychiatric Convention focused on community-based treatment settings. “We hope to encourage all people affected by psychiatry to consider the role of coercion and force in their treatment, and for those who have been harmed by their experience with psychiatry to know that people are working to try to help them and that there are ways to get involved in the effort to make things better.”

    For more information on this event, please contact Daniel Hazen at (contact info.)

    To speak with the Center for Human Rights of Users and Survivors of Psychiatry, please contact (Tina’s contact info.)”

    If anyone wants to get involved in organizing for this, please email Daniel @ [email protected]

    Join the event @ facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/OccupyPsychiatry/events

    Organizers are making an effort to outreach this event to as many groups that work with people affected by psychiatry as possible. Any assistance toward that end would be great.

     

    “In online  forums such as facebook’s pro-medication & pro-psychiatry, groups there is the perfect opportunity to get the message across? Yet what happens when any of us try to do this, even within a group which has fist-hand experience of hospitalization.” My experience has been that one is easily compartmentalized and dismissed as an “extremist” or “a scientologist” or, worse, “an ableist.” It is hard to navigate those compartmentalizations, but keeping them in mind, and acknowledging them, tends to help to shape the dialogue in ways that make “boxing” a little more difficult.

     

     

    #18323
    David Bates
    Participant

    Hi Faith, as you wrote and I agree with you;

    “My experience has been that one is easily compartmentalized and dismissed as an “extremist” or “a scientologist” or, worse, “an ableist.” It is hard to navigate those compartmentalizations, but keeping them in mind, and acknowledging them, tends to help to shape the dialogue in ways that make “boxing” a little more difficult.”

    Yet getting the message across in such groups does reflect the difficulty we face in getting the message across to the general public. I understand the point about basic human rights issues that we are trying to articulate, yet I suggest there is a difference in the resistance to our message, to the resistance towards other human rights violations? I suggest that the FEAR surrounding the mental illness experience, particularly psychosis, is more deeply entrenched than any other resistance to minority groups, in society’s consensus normality?

    I’ve suggested that the movement could be re-framed as a human-meaning movement, for it is this aspect of our experience which so scares the pants of consensus-normality. No other experience like altered states of mind, challenges the very meaning of what it is to be human, and deeply held suspicion and ignorance stands ready to react against us, in any display of perceived,  stereo-typical behavior, like the boycott normality rally, which many think did more harm than good.

    I hope these forums can begin to explore the reality of our own experience, so that we can counter psychiatry’s intellectual-posture about a disease process, still waiting empirical proof of its assumption.  I understand the feelings about a need to take action, to advance a human rights cause, yet I question just how much we understand our position in society and autonomic, unconscious reactions against us? As Ted Chabasinski writes;

    “I am very consistent in saying that we should think about and analyze our situation before we take action.”

    IMO Society is organized hierarchically in a functional structure of rank & status, no less so in our survivor community than anywhere else in society. IMO This rank & status functional structure, is a direct expression of our individual function at an unconscious level of autonomic activity in the nervous systems of our body/brain. IMO Its important to understand one’s own functioning beneath the “intellectual posturing” of our minds, our postural attitude to life, based on our individual life experience.  IMO Experience, creates expectation at an unconscious level of actual function and we all need to see the difference between what we think & what we do? Example: Are the events you mention above, as much about personal reward behavior, as getting the message across? Do we really understand our own unconscious needs, in our daily arousal cycle of metabolic energy organization, in our needs of motivated movement, which includes thinking, as an energy discharge?

    I applaud the youthful enthusiasm of those who see a need to organize & do something, yet caution about the hidden foundations of group activity, as the usual “generals” of age old history build their empires on the sunshine of “adoration,” while we all forget Mosses warning about the worship of idols? In Social Politics, it has always been the habit of those who seek rank & status, to distort the message to the individual, found in all the great teacher’s wisdom.  Wisdom which generally advises to look within, when seeking answers to life’s perceived problems?

    Perhaps people might consider advice from a modern wisdom teacher?

    I & OTHER:
    So every ego is continuously struggling for survival, trying to protect and enlarge itself. To uphold the I thought, it needs the opposite thought of “the other.” The conceptual “I” cannot survive without the conceptual “other.”

    The others are most other when I see them as my enemies. At one end of this scale of this unconscious egoic pattern lies the egoic compulsive habit of faultfinding and complaining about others. Jesus referred to it when he said, “Why to do you see the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?”

    At the other end of the scale, there is physical violence between individuals and warfare between nations. In the Bible, Jesus’ question remains unanswered, but the answer is, of course: Because when I criticize or condemn another, it makes me feel bigger, superior.” Excerpts from “A NEW EARTH” by Eckhart Tolle. ”

     

    Regards,

    David.

     

    #18333
    Faith Rhyne
    Participant

    Hi David – thanks so much for your wise response. this will be brief, but your perspective really resonated with me – as it often does. I am personally not to keen on what I see as “directly oppositional” actions (either in psych rights or Occupy) – because I feel like they actually reinforce the us/them paradigm that contributes so mightily  to the distortions that are put forth by hierarchical and factionalized systems of meaning and end up alienating people from the personal relevance of the cause, whatever that relevance may be…I’ve been trying to frame language that invites people to consider how they might feel/see/believe…rather than simply telling them what they should see/think/believe on any given topic…because in my mind, to do so is no different than a system informing one of what one’s idea ought to be. To me, the issue of human rights does boil down to the human right to make our own meaning and to have that be upheld and honored, respected. I think that you’re spot-on re: fear and that often people caught between conflicting ideas experience a double-binding dissonance that actually discourages empowerment.

    My interest in participating in amped events is largely based in a desire to try to transform those lines of messaging that create division…because, you’re right, the message will not be heard if we deliver it in ways that don’t honor people’s realities.

    more later…this really got me thinking.

    “Half the time you think you’re thinking, you’re really listening.” t. mckenna

     

     

     

     

     

    #18335
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    “because I feel like they actually reinforce the us/them paradigm that contributes so mightily  to the distortions that are put forth by hierarchical and factionalized systems of meaning and end up alienating people from the personal relevance of the cause, whatever that relevance may be…I’ve been trying to frame language that invites people to consider how they might feel/see/believe…rather than simply telling them what they should see/think/believe on any given topic…because in my mind, to do so is no different than a system informing one of what one’s idea ought to be. To me, the issue of human rights does boil down to the human right to make our own meaning and to have that be upheld and honored, respected. I think that you’re spot-on re: fear and that often people caught between conflicting ideas experience a double-binding dissonance that actually discourages empowerment.”

    I like to keep it simple. Government shouldn’t steal people’s right to own their own bodies. There is no post-modern moral relativistic verbosity overdose required. Society just needs to keep its hands off people’s bodies who haven’t committed a crime.

     

     

    #18337
    Faith Rhyne
    Participant

    sorry, postmodern relativistic verbosity is the way my brain works. yeah, there are  simple facts, but how to impart those simple truths to the people who most need to hear them is -apparently- not so simple.

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