Saturday, November 17, 2018

Comments by jw_arndt

Showing 24 of 24 comments.

  • I can attest to the remarkable effects of niacin on psychosis. The first time I heard about it was in the late 1960’s as drug culture street lore on how to stop a bad acid trip. I never used it for that (even though I had a few acid bummers…) but in the early 70’s I used if a couple times when I started hallucinating from amphetamines. Worked like a charm. Later, after I got clean and sober, I had a massive mental meltdown from nicotine withdrawal. That was in 1978. Days without sleep. pounding my head on the wall, hallucinating police sirens and my sculptures running around the room, I had the presence of mind to go the local drugstore at 4AM and get a bottle of it. Relief within minutes. Then in 1987, I started wigging out from the effects of prednisone that I had to take for a life-threatening autoimmune disorder. This time I thought my toaster was possessed. I’m not kidding. It was saying awful things to me. Again, I (barely) had the presence of mind to go and get some niacin. That walk to the drugstore was the shakiest four blocks I’d walked since sobering up, but I made it and swallowed a gram of it on the way home. Nearly instant relief. And I made toast.
    God bless Dr. Abram Hoffer. He ought to have received the Nobel Prize.

  • The interpersonal violence triggered by ssri’s and similar drugs is bad enough, but the REAL nightmare scenario is when somebody with access to nuclear weapons goes berserk on them. It’s only a matter of time. (It’s a comforting fiction that only the president can launch U.S. nukes. In fact, many, many U.S. service personnel, and even military personnel of allied countries from Norway to Turkey have access to American nuclear bombs, and can launch them in a crisis without a presidential directive.)

  • The author says in her first paragraph that both eugenic sterilization and forced drugging legislation “proceed out of good intentions.”

    Really?

    With the sickeningly high numbers of psychiatric patients (variably 50-80%) who report having been sexually abused when they were young, I’d say the Murphy Bill would be more accurately described as the “Child molester protection and assistance act of 2015.”

  • It’s pretty well established that if you’re not crazy when you start taking antipsychotics, you will be if you ever try to stop taking them.

    So why pay people to take them?

    To produce more crazy people, that’s why! Otherwise, p$ychiatrists might have to get honest jobs.

    Jeeeezzzzz. Understanding that is hardly rocket science.

  • Julie, that was really inspirational. I hope it’ll be read by others who feel that they’re trapped, so they can see there IS a way out.
    BTW, you and Puzzle are looking great!

  • “….When my friend was admitted, she had the delusion that she was a participant in the war. It seems like a no-brainer that whoever was in charge should have changed the channel.”

    Changed the channel to what? Disney?

    I’m reminded of the way mental health propagandists weasled their way into the debate about nuclear disarmament in November, 1983, when one of the major tv networks ran a show called “The Day After,” about what would happen the the US in a nuclear war with the Soviet Union. Saying it might be “too upsetting for people with mental illnesses to watch,” NAMI-like groups milked it for all it was worth by setting up volunteer crisis hotlines to refer traumatized viewers to mental health professionals and browbeating newspapers and tv stations into giving them all sorts of free airtime to yammer on and on about watching out for the “signs of mental illnesses.” So far as I could see, that media blitz actually became the template for all present day mental health media campaigns. I mean anybody who followed events of the early 1980’s knew that we were perilously close to nuclear annihilation, perhaps even closer that we were during the infamous Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962. (I’m old enough to remember that one, too.) All Life on Earth hung in the balance, people all over the world were in the streets protesting, and along comes this slick Public Relations campaign to exploit the public’s legitimate fears and sign gullible Americans up for their services. It was truly nauseating.

    So the point I’m trying to make is that if people Mad people want respect, we can’t expect to be protected from reality or to be treated like children. To do so not only betrays our own class interests, but also gives the enemy ammunition to assault and degrade Society at large.

  • Sorry, but I’m with Rossa on this. However I’m not blaming Laura. I see it as a Societal problem, that writers, editors, bloggers and webmasters everywhere have become afraid of being accused of insensitivity if they express any raw Human emotion without some polite disclaimer that it may be “triggering.” Everybody’s been traumatized by life, some much worse than others, but to equate mere words on a page with some actual physical violence is more than a wee bit hysterical and the more readers come to expect that their own personal frailties will be catered to every time they open a book or click on a link, the weaker the art of writing will become until it’s toothless against any REAL evil in this world. And that of course, is what the true criminals and abusers want to happen.

  • Untreated symptoms of Creative Disorder harm not only the individual suffering from it, but the Community as a whole. Healthy, non-creative people are made to feel inadequate or stupid when exposed to difficult ideas or challenging art, and the Economy as a whole suffers when people afflicted with this insidious Organic Brain Disease to follow their own fanciful pursuits rather than consuming Professionally Manufactured Entertainment Products. And there are mountains of evidence of a correlation between Creative Disorder and extreme violence. Adolph Hitler dabbled in painting, Saddam Hussein was a novelist and Charles Manson was a would-be “Rock” singer. Need I say more?

    Sadly, digital technology and the world wide web have incited Creative Disorder in countless millions more previously Healthy Citizens by bringing the tools of writing, film making, photo manipulation, etc, to their fingertips. Particularly alarming is the growth of sites like YouTube, which actually has a “Creator hub” that bills itself as “Your home for resources to help create better content, build fan bases and turn your creativity into a career.” (!) A sane society does not arm baboons with flamethrowers, not should it put creative instruments in the hands of average Americans, who should be content with watching Dancing with the Stars and not attempt to dance themselves.

    Clinicians would do well to impress on teachers and caregivers the urgency of Identifying and Treating children who display symptoms of Creative Disorder before tragedy strikes.

  • One thing each of us could to would be to send this link to journalists, tv presenters, radio personalities, etc. as “something you may be interested in for the next time you cover Mental Helath issues.” Of course 99% will reject or ignore it, but that 1% with a little bit of integrity could reach a lot of people.
    I agree, there’s entirely too much preaching to the choir around here.

  • I’ve been thinking along those lines for quite some time, although wasn’t able to articulate it. Sometimes though, what psychiatry does- especially to children, with antipsychotic drugs- looks more like ritual human sacrifice than just ritual degradation, the difference being that in human sacrifice the individual is destroyed, not just degraded. I hope it doesn’t sound like I’m splitting hairs.