Saturday, January 19, 2019
2nd Story respite house

The Never Ending Story: How 2nd Story Respite House Was Saved

We had built relationships with provider and peer organizations and NAMI. We had learned how to interface with the system and share the peer perspective. Ultimately, our relationships saved us. We had worked to start our own organization with the same providers who now were in position to step forward in our defense.
2nd Story respite house

The Never Ending Story: How 2nd Story Respite House Was Saved

We had built relationships with provider and peer organizations and NAMI. We had learned how to interface with the system and share the peer perspective. Ultimately, our relationships saved us. We had worked to start our own organization with the same providers who now were in position to step forward in our defense.
hospital is sick

When the Hospital Is Sick

At my job as an inpatient mental health counselor, I had to confront the reality of a hospitalization system with serious and devastating flaws. I felt immensely powerless and understood how my coworkers could end up so negligent, numb, and at times abusive. And I understood how patients could become violent or self-injurious after years in these dismal hospitals.
open dialogue

Open Dialogue: Does the Current Research Data Support Further Investment?

A leading US journal published an extensive literature review and analysis of currently available research on Open Dialogue. An accompanying commentary concludes, “The present data on Open Dialogue are insufficient to warrant calls for further research on the program other than those projects that are currently under way.”
new york times

Suicide, Ketamine, the Propaganda Model and the New York Times

A lengthy NYT op-ed had offered what I considered to be a fairly insane solution: “an old anesthetic called ketamine that, at low doses, can halt suicidal thoughts almost immediately.” Despite recognizing how much power the psychiatric-pharmaceutical industrial complex has over the NYT, I submitted my own op-ed in response.
mental hospital

Ten Hospitalizations in Three Years

When the psychiatrist prescribed me Zoloft, he did not warn me that it could cause a manic episode. So my second hospitalization was a disaster. A mental hospital is like a deranged dystopian high school. The upstairs was chaotic, dangerous, and violent. Sometimes people were yelling and throwing things. But these weren’t the most harmful moments.
bipolar drugs good bad ugly

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: An Infographic on Bipolar Drugs

Bipolar drug therapy is a balancing act of benefits vs. harms. Odds of attributable benefit cluster in a 15-25% band, so 75%-85% don’t see substantial benefit. Stated differently, if five people take a bipolar drug, only one is likely to see substantial improvement due to it, but all five will have side effects.

MIA Continuing Education

Webinar on informed consent about psychiatric drugs: MIA Continuing Education is hosting a 6-webinar course on what true informed consent about psychiatric drugs would look like, and how such consent could transform psychiatric care. Enroll now at an EARLYBIRD price of $40 for the course, which begins on January 22.

MIA: Support Groups for Parents

Beginning Feb. 5 and Feb.14, Mad in the Family will begin hosting monthly, moderated online support groups for parents skeptical of, or seeking alternatives to, conventional drug-based treatments for their children with mental health challenges. We offer two groups—one in Europe and the other in the United States/Canada. Each is limited to 15 participants. Learn more, and sign up here.

Parenting Today: Raising Strong Resilient Kids

Dr. Ben Furman is a Finnish psychiatrist, psychotherapist and an internationally renowned teacher of solution-focused therapy. Click here for more Parenting Today videos.

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ARTWORK AND POETRY

Submit your artwork, poetry or humor to [email protected]

“Love Among Ruins,” by Rebeca

Lancet Psychiatry Needs to Retract the ADHD-Enigma Study

Lancet Psychiatry, a UK-based medical journal, recently published a study that concluded brain scans showed that individuals diagnosed with ADHD had smaller brains. That conclusion is belied by the study data. The journal needs to retract this study. UPDATE: Lancet Psychiatry (online) has published letters critical of the study, and the authors' response, and a correction.

The Concerned Parents’ Project: 31 Questions

The Concerned Parents’ Project grew out of the idea that there may be parents out there who are confused and bewildered by the mixed messages on what it is to have normal and healthy childhood experiences. We posted a new question and answer for parents each day in March.

MIA GLOBAL

Read updates from Mad in America’s family of affiliated sites here.

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