Saturday, December 5, 2020

Comments by Lerkkweed

Showing 22 of 22 comments.

  • I like the reference to the “effort to combat overly ‘mentalistic’ approaches in psychiatry.” Like the effort to combat overly ‘computational’ approaches in programming solutions. A computer gamester is unlikely to get far outwitting Zarkon, ruthless ruler of the Galra empire, by removing his computer’s back plate, checking the wiring, and perhaps removing a few banks of RAM.

    Actual physiological problems – which can certainly affect mental states, function, and behavior – are the province of neurology or other bona fide medical specialty which deals with medicine’s proper realm: observable, measurable, physiological pathology.

  • Wow… Even more special than I thought. As you likely know psych survivors repeatedly report a maddening reversal impairing effective care: expression of emotional distress is dismissed as biological and subject to somatic interventions like drugs, ECT, psychosurgery, while expression of physical distress is dismissed as “just in your head” and symptomatic of “your mental illness” with sometimes devastating, even fatal consequences.

    Gotta poke around a bit more about him.

  • Thank you, Robert.

    Unfortunate but about what I expected that Julia Carmel gave the last word to Bonnie’s status-quo, mainstream adversary. Posting the obit on Facebook I accompanied it with the following comments with several editorial nips and tucks, most anti-psych 101…

    Edward Shorter, professor of psychiatry, was an old adversary. He’s quoted saying, “They’re trying to claim that there’s no such thing as psychiatric illness, and I think she did a lot of damage with the publicity she got surrounding that.”

    I would ask the question, “Why are there no science-based medical diagnostics for any of the over 300 ‘psychiatric illnesses’ listed in the DSM e.g. an MRI scan, blood test, biopsy to confirm BPD (bipolar disorder)?” The distress, typically trauma-induced, is very real. But psychiatry, having no coherent theory of mind, has only one tool to deal with it: partial brain and neural deactivation by somatic (bodily) interventions. Comparable to a computer technician who has never heard of software.

    The biomedical model is neither biology nor medicine but rationalization for a repressive state-adjunct-in-reserve properly categorized with policing and penology flimsily dressed up as a medical specialty. It conveniently locates “the problem” in the responder, not to what they’re responding to. It claims to treat mysterious chemical imbalances in the brain and nervous system which are never named, measured, or corroborated by medical diagnostics.

    Unlike diabetes and insulin doctors never identify the deficient chemical, the norm by which it is measured, by how much out the patient has to be to qualify as having the disorder, what makes that chemical specific to that disorder, and why i.e. the mechanism of action.

    Yet a psychiatric diagnosis can pretext arrest, incarceration, loss of legal rights, forced brain and neurological injury.

  • Sure. As I wrote above “sever its connection to State power.”

    By which I mean to the regulatory, credentialing, funding, and coercive apparatus of the State that the State-Science-Corporate-Professional-Media Alliance is built on. All of this justified by concern for public safety, all of them in fact undermining it by enabling the power of special interests. Once the broad mechanism is understood the details can be worked out.

  • Psychiatry is voodoo.

    It only looks at – or pretends to look at – one factor shaping human behavior: biology. Among other things it overlooks the fact that humans are conscious organisms, that consciousness is an interactive process with the organism’s environment, hence that their interaction – experience – will profoundly influence the organism. A serious oversight for the putative science of the mind.

    Actual physical pathologies affecting brain and neurological function such as concussion, meningitis, Parkinson’s disease, neurosyphilis, brain tumor, multiple sclerosis, encephalitis, Down syndrome – which can profoundly effect mental states and behavior – are the province of neurology or other specialties that deal with medicine’s proper realm: observable, measurable, physical injury, disease, and maldevelopment.
    Psychiatric disorders do not appear in neurology pathology textbooks for the reason that they have no physical markers, structural or chemical, hence cannot be diagnosed by physical tests.

  • Still have to finish the article, but Florida lawyer and pro bono advocate of the rights of the psychiatrized, Wayne Ramsay, has compiled a series of essays that make a useful online book providing an excellent introduction to the critique of psychiatry: primarily an anthology of quotes with bibliography sprinkled with cogent insights of his own, often from a legal perspective.
    http://wayneramsay.com

    He makes several interesting remarks about Torrey in the essay ‘Why Psychiatry is Evil’:
    http://wayneramsay.com/evil.htm

    “It is impossible for me to believe someone who so eloquently and convincingly debunked the concept of mental illness, including schizophrenia, as Dr. Torrey did in ‘The Death of Psychiatry,’ could be sincere now when he promotes these very ideas. In 1990 at the Thomas S. Szasz Tribute Dinner in New York City in a face-to-face conversation with Dr. Szasz, author of ‘The Myth of Mental Illness,’ I asked Dr. Szasz, ‘Whatever happened to Fuller Torrey?!’ Dr. Szasz answered with a single word, ‘Funding’, and suggested I ask another psychiatrist who was with us that night, Dr. Ron Leifer, who gave me the same answer. Dr. Szasz wrote an article about Dr. Torrey’s turnabout titled ‘Psychiatric Fraud and Force: A Critique of E. Fuller Torrey’ in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology (Vol. 44, No. 4, Fall 2004, p. 416).”

  • Florida lawyer and pro bono advocate of the rights of the psychiatrized, Wayne Ramsay, has compiled a series of essays that comprise a useful online book providing an excellent introduction to the critique of psychiatry: primarily an anthology of quotes with bibliography sprinkled with cogent insights of his own, often from a legal perspective.

    http://wayneramsay.com

    But in the second last essay ‘Why Psychiatry is Evil’ he mentions a conversation he had with Thomas Szasz about Torrey:

    “It is impossible for me to believe someone who so eloquently and convincingly debunked the concept of mental illness, including schizophrenia, as Dr. Torrey did in ‘The Death of Psychiatry,’ could be sincere now when he promotes these very ideas. In 1990 at the Thomas S. Szasz Tribute Dinner in New York City in a face-to-face conversation with Dr. Szasz, author of ‘The Myth of Mental Illness,’ I asked Dr. Szasz, ‘Whatever happened to Fuller Torrey?!’ Dr. Szasz answered with a single word, ‘Funding’, and suggested I ask another psychiatrist who was with us that night, Dr. Ron Leifer, who gave me the same answer. Dr. Szasz wrote an article about Dr. Torrey’s turnabout titled ‘Psychiatric Fraud and Force: A Critique of E. Fuller Torrey’ in the Journal of Humanistic Psychology (Vol. 44, No. 4, Fall 2004, p. 416).”

  • You’re absolutely unbelievable. Do you think a person just wakes up one day and decides to become a criminal? I’d recommend reading up on the psychology of criminal behavior and the horror that goes into to producing one. May you never find yourself on the wrong side of the law and crying for help to smug, willfully obtuse, self-satisfied, self-righteous bastards. Shame!!

  • OMFG Otto. My deepest sympathies. What a nightmare.

    It’s pretty sad but my advice is to do everything you can to avoid confrontation. Become grey, boring. Nice. Maybe occasionally even praise them. Flattery and bullshit until you can weasel your way out of there. The more you fight them, the more you take a stand while behind their walls in their clutches the more you risk being taken down by them.

    Googling “how to get out of a mental hospital” turns up quite a bit.

    Best wishes.

  • Psychiatry has “overlooked” the central fact of human nature and core driver of human behaviour: that they are conscious organisms. Hence their behaviour cannot be understood without reference to what they are conscious of. A rather serious oversight for the putative science of the mind. Akin to a doctor addressing a fracture by vague references to mysterious chemical imbalances and genetic abnormalities while dismissing as irrelevant the patient’s account that they fell from a tree.

    The remarkable Italian educator Maria Montessori (1870–1952), who developed the Montessori method of child education wrote, “An interesting piece of work, freely chosen, which has the virtue of inducing concentration rather than fatigue, adds to the child’s energies and mental capacities, and leads him to self-mastery … As soon as children find something that interests them they lose their instability and learn to concentrate.”

    Montessori children often have to be accelerated entering the public school system. Visitors to Montessori classrooms are often astonished, even alarmed by their quiet as children assiduously concentrate on the tasks provided by their learning materials – without suasion from teachers. The focus and discipline come from within.

    Filmmaker Stanley Kubrick noted how important interest is in learning and gave the example of a boy doing poorly in school but has memorized every score of every game of his favourite baseball team for the past fifty years.

    Though only part of the problem-answer in an essay titled ‘A Teachin’ Deficit Disorder’ James J. Campbell, M.D. argues that many cases of ADD and ADHD are the result of deeply flawed reading instructional methods e,g, ‘whole language,’ widespread in America’s public schools today. He provides several case studies in which private tutoring by a different method produced dramatic improvement. I’ve saved the article but it’s not posted stand alone, only encapsulated in this report (he changed the title once and may have done so again):

    http://www.nrrf.org/learning/attention-deficit-disorder-poor-reading-instruction-is-there-a-connection/

    As Breggin and others note, by locating the problem in the child such diagnoses are convenient and validating for parents, teachers and other authorities as their parenting styles, teaching methods and administrative prowess are not called into question. The problem lies in the child. And it is the child whose psyche must be partially disabled with Ritalin et al or increasingly electroshock to conform to their expectations. Breggin notes that even advocates acknowledge these disorders tend to mysteriously disappear at the onset of summer vacation.