Monday, August 3, 2020

Comments by kalmd

Showing 5 of 5 comments.

  • Hi Oldhead, I personally believe the “mind” is in someway directly connected to the brain. I don’t know if we can independently call the mind an organ yet because we have yet to understand so much about it or the brain for that matter. From the cases that I have seen, Psychiatry measures the “problem” based on a level of functioning. When my patients can no longer complete their daily activities, it becomes a problem for them. Hence, the problem of the mind is to me is a problem in the body. Neurotransmitters probably play some role just because of the fact that they play a role in about EVERYTHING in our body,haha. But I don’t know what other factors, yet to be found, contribute to the issues. How about yourself, where do you think the problem stems?

  • Hi AA, definitely not the same song and dance here haha. I definitely see and hear the struggles you’re talking about. I posted a comment to Dr. Burstow below and will post it here for you in case you don’t get notifications. Thanks for your reply!
    “Thank you for your kind reply. I am currently rotating at a Forensic Psychiatric Unit. While I do believe that many of these patients have enormous distress and confusion stemming from early lifetime events, there are also many that have had no early life distress and are suffering from different hallucinations, anxiety, delusions, etc… Some had been having these issues prior to even starting any medication according to family reports. I don’t mind not calling it “Mental Illness”, but I must call these “symptoms” of a “problem” somewhere in the human body, most likely the brain. As an aspiring physician, these people & their loved ones are suffering; I would like to help. Medication may not be the answer in many cases, but from what I have seen, therapy helps in 100%, Social Work helps in 100% and most importantly is for the patient & their family to feel & see the doctor actually give a damn about them, which I do and many others do as well. It is true that our treatment options are limited, but I hope to pursue my career with an open heart to actually help my patients feel and function better. I would like to do this with support from all angles, including “antipsychiatry”. However, just the name “antipsychiatry” is too one sided Dr. Burstow. My Grandfather once told me to “never believe just one side regardless of what position you’re put in because you will always find good people to help you on each of those sides.” While I believe you and I are well intentioned good people; I see that you have chosen to believe in only one side while completely disregarding the other, which I see as unfair and overall hurtful to society. I would hope that you would take these young yet genuine words of a medical student starting his career in Psychiatry into account as you move forward so that when I am a resident physician we can work together to help those who need our help the most. Thank you.”

  • Thank you for your kind reply. I am currently rotating at a Forensic Psychiatric Unit. While I do believe that many of these patients have enormous distress and confusion stemming from early lifetime events, there are also many that have had no early life distress and are suffering from different hallucinations, anxiety, delusions, etc… Some had been having these issues prior to even starting any medication according to family reports. I don’t mind not calling it “Mental Illness”, but I must call these “symptoms” of a “problem” somewhere in the human body, most likely the brain. As an aspiring physician, these people & their loved ones are suffering; I would like to help. Medication may not be the answer in many cases, but from what I have seen, therapy helps in 100%, Social Work helps in 100% and most importantly is for the patient & their family to feel & see the doctor actually give a damn about them, which I do and many others do as well. It is true that our treatment options are limited, but I hope to pursue my career with an open heart to actually help my patients feel and function better. I would like to do this with support from all angles, including “antipsychiatry”. However, just the name “antipsychiatry” is too one sided Dr. Burstow. My Grandfather once told me to “never believe just one side regardless of what position you’re put in because you will always find good people to help you on each of those sides.” While I believe you and I are well intentioned good people; I see that you have chosen to believe in only one side while completely disregarding the other, which I see as unfair and overall hurtful to society. I would hope that you would take these young yet genuine words of a medical student starting his career in Psychiatry into account as you move forward so that when I am a resident physician we can work together to help those who need our help the most. Thank you.

  • Dear Dr. Burstow,

    I am a medical student with a sincere interest in Mental Health & Psychiatry. I thank you for your care towards the many patients that suffer from mental illness and the uphill battle they must fight in today’s limited psychiatric care model.

    With that said, have you lost all hope in Psychiatric care? Also, why do you frame a picture of Psychiatry being so evil? I sincerely believe in mental illness, but just don’t think we have all the answers yet. I also believe that myself and Psychiatrists that I have come across, actually genuinely care about the well being of our patients. As I watch my patients suffer day in and out with or without medication, I agree that there is much to be changed and learned. I hope to be a part of this change throughout my career. However, it hurt me to see that you created a scholarship to invalidate a whole field aimed at genuinely treating some of the most vulnerable people in the world…I look forward to your reply.

    With respect & a sincere hope for the future of our mentally ill,
    Kal