Thursday, July 7, 2022

Comments by Enrico Rodriquez

Showing 100 of 133 comments. Show all.

  • https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2017/018936s108lbl.pdf

    Prozac comes with a 35-page warning label. It’s hard to imagine BP is trying to withhold concerns about potential dangers of this SSRI.

    More than 20 million prescriptions for antidepressants were written between October and December 2020 (that is 80,000,000 annually)— a 6% increase compared to the same three months in 2019 — according to statistics reported by the NHS Business Services Authority (NHSBSA).

    Overall, the statistics showed that 23% more patients received an antidepressant item in the third quarter of 2020–2021 compared to the same quarter in 2015–2016.

    It is hard for me to understand that anti-depressants do so little good and cause so much harm when 80,000,000 prescriptions are written for them yearly. What am I missing?

  • “Not only are these discontinuation syndromes and this means that you are going too fast, and you have to slow down, but if there is withdrawal, you should think of relapse and continue the medication again.”

    How do you distinguish them?

    Without significant evidence, without double-blind, controlled studies, how can we know what causes what?

  • You too.
    I don’t understand what your point is by sharing what Insel said about the failures of NIMH and, why it is that you suspect I think differently. What does what he experienced have to do with me?
    I will tell you for what it’s worth that I think what’s been written here, in general and specifically, has been harmful for many people and I’m mad at MIA. Maybe that’s what you sense. I don’t get it.
    The human brain is extraordinary. We are just beginning to understand how it works. I believe new discoveries will compare with recognizing how bacteria and viruses were responsible for disease. We are just now getting a glimpse of how the brain produces thoughts. To me, that is one of the most profound mysteries in the universe. That somehow flesh and blood can create one thought. A thought from a lump of cells. How in the world does that happen? What is a thought? How do chemicals form even just a single word, or an A or B or anything abstract like that?
    And there are 35 trillion times 10 billion ways for the brain to misfire, or to be lacking in something-maybe a few million proteins, or whatever, that creates all kinds of illnesses or malfunctions.

  • If I cut if my hand, I still am able to think. If I soak my neurons in alcohol, my brain will malfunction. If I pump dopamine into my neurons through vigorous exercise, I feel better. If I deprive my neurons of oxygen, I will lose consciousness.
    The mind and the brain are intertwined. To isolate them from each other doesn’t seem possible. I can damage my mind by sticking an iron bar through it. I can remove memories by shooting electricity in to the hippocampus.
    When I feel better, my thoughts are less troublesome. I can act my way into better thinking and a better mood, too.

    Personally, I don’t think a precise diagnosis is as important as relieving unbearable pain. even though there is no proof of pain. Do we refrain from offering chemicals to reduce pain because it cannot be measured scientifically?

  • “Anyone who has had even the slightest experience working with children and families can attest to the fact that there are always alternative psychosocial explanations, if one is prepared to look for them. The reality, however, is that within the practice of psychiatry, these alternate explanations are almost never sought.” hickey

    name three alternatives

    “And the reason they are not sought is because psychiatry has effectively closed the door on these kinds of deliberations. Within the psychiatric framework, if a child (or adult) meets the arbitrary and inherently vague criteria listed in the DSM, then he has a brain illness called ADHD. So the notion of even looking for psychosocial explanations not only doesn’t happen, but would be seen within psychiatry as ridiculous.” hickey

    How do you know?

    Things are different today, Phil. Almost everything you have provided over decades to refute ADHD is dead wrong.

  • “The youngest students in class get diagnosed with ADHD more often and receive more ADHD medication than their older classmates.”

    Nick Kowalenko from the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists said there was insufficient detail in the research

    Too bad the older kids may have been overlooked.

    “I’ve learnt of some situations where children are not allowed to return to school until they are medicated by a doctor. The doctor is then compromised…” A supporter of ant-ADHD rhetoric.

    easterbeilbs responded:
    Are you sure? I’ve read your comment base and you make a lot of excellent well-informed observations. However, in more than 25 years in schools, I’ve never observed what you describe.

    Trixr agrees:
    That’s completely misleading. Teachers do not “diagnose” – they are highlighting a potential issue.
    Only doctors can diagnose, and I’d like to see evidence of schools mandating drugs. I can imagine that a school may want to see evidence that an extremely disruptive child is receiving some kind of therapeutic attention.

    Redgum adds:
    To support the previous poster, I’ve worked more than 20 years in schools (half that time in WA) and I’ve never known another teacher or principal to diagnoses ADHD. I have been asked, by parents, to complete observation forms for the doctor who is deciding on a diagnosis (forms which, to be completely honest, I have found to be unclear and not terribly useful).

    Paul Harvey. Now for the rest of the story/

    It is astonishing how much misinformation is spread around about ADHD. Many latch onto it like Paul said it. Much is taken out of context and framed is the worst possible ways.
    We are encouraged to enjoy our addiction. They hope we enjoy killing innocent kids and forcing them to behave according to our Puritan desires. Restricting them. Punishing them severely for being themselves. Refusing to be open-minded, calling us lazy, clueless, without genuine concern for children. One writer for MIA insists that ADHD is the result of lousy parents.
    I don’t believe I have ever heard a positive comment about a parent who is doing the best she can and reports her child is doing wonderfully on medication.

    Today there is proof that, “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice” O. S. Birk

    I hope someone will and I invite anyone to explain in detail exactly what this means, “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice”

  • “The youngest students in class get diagnosed with ADHD more often and receive more ADHD medication than their older classmates.”

    Nick Kowalenko from the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists said there was insufficient detail in the research

    Too bad the older kids may have been overlooked.

    “I’ve learnt of some situations where children are not allowed to return to school until they are medicated by a doctor. The doctor is then compromised…” A supporter of ant-ADHD rhetoric.

    easterbeilbs responded:
    Are you sure? I’ve read your comment base and you make a lot of excellent well-informed observations. However, in more than 25 years in schools, I’ve never observed what you describe.

    Trixr agrees:
    That’s completely misleading. Teachers do not “diagnose” – they are highlighting a potential issue.
    Only doctors can diagnose, and I’d like to see evidence of schools mandating drugs. I can imagine that a school may want to see evidence that an extremely disruptive child is receiving some kind of therapeutic attention.

    Redgum adds:
    To support the previous poster, I’ve worked more than 20 years in schools (half that time in WA) and I’ve never known another teacher or principal to diagnoses ADHD. I have been asked, by parents, to complete observation forms for the doctor who is deciding on a diagnosis (forms which, to be completely honest, I have found to be unclear and not terribly useful).

    Paul Harvey. Now for the rest of the story/

    It is astonishing how much misinformation is spread around about ADHD. Many latch onto it like Paul said it. Much is taken out of context and framed is the worst possible ways.
    We are encouraged to enjoy our addiction. They hope we enjoy killing innocent kids and forcing them to behave according to our Puritan desires. Restricting them. Punishing them severely for being themselves. Refusing to be open-minded, calling us lazy, clueless, without genuine concern for children. One writer for MIA insists that ADHD is the result of lousy parents.
    I don’t believe I have ever heard a positive comment about a parent who is doing the best she can and reports her child is doing wonderfully on medication.

    Today there is proof that, “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice” O. S. Birk

    I hope someone will and I invite anyone to explain in detail exactly what this means, “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice”

  • Dr. Berezin, the 4 temperments you mention, from where do they come?

    “We evolve as a species, and we evolve as individuals in relation to our salient environment. All throughout our development – the embryo, fetus, newborn, baby, toddler, child, and adolescent adapts to its emotional environment. There are only three relevant issues – responsiveness, emotional deprivation, and abuse. Each of us fields our experience through the unique constellation of our temperament. The four elements of temperament are Internalization/Externalization, Introversion/Extroversion, Active/Passive, and Participant/Observer.”

    We must eat and breathe. Molecules must enter our bodies or our temperments disappear. Add toxic molecules to food and air and our temperments cease. The molecular level of brains is extraordinarily important.

  • “More recently, however, experts have concluded that reacting to a placebo is not proof that a certain treatment doesn’t work, but rather that another, non-pharmacological mechanism may be present.”
    “The power of the placebo effect”
    Harvard Health
    Aug 9, 2019

    Bob, how do you account for the hundreds of millions of people whose lives have been spared through the drugs produced by BP? Certainly, not every one of them was helped through the placebo effect. If they weren’t having a considerable impact, coming off them wouldn’t be such a nightmare. If the drug trials are fixed in favor of the drug company, why do they spend millions developing them? Couldn’t they throw some innocuous chemicals together and achieve the same results?
    When psychiatrists first found that chemicals could relieve some of the pain of depression, they were surprised. Didn’t they soon realize they were on to something potentially groundbraking?

  • Keep in mind the great news out of the Middle East. Reseachers there discovered, “Published: 26 October 2021
    “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice”
    D. Halperin, A. Stavsky, R. Kadir, M. Drabkin, O. Wormser, Y. Yogev, V. Dolgin, R. Proskorovski-Ohayon, Y. Perez, H. Nudelman, O. Stoler, B. Rotblat, T. Lifschytz, A. Lotan, G. Meiri, D. Gitler & O. S. Birk

    CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function CAUSES ADHD

    Also,
    Here we demonstrate familial ADHD caused by a missense mutation in CDH2, which encodes the adhesion protein N-cadherin, known to play a significant role in synaptogenesis;{Synaptogenesis is a process involving the formation of a neurotransmitter release site in the presynaptic neuron and a receptive field at the postsynaptic partners, and the precise alignment of pre- and post-synaptic specializations.} the mutation affects maturation of the protein. In line with the human phenotype, CRISPR/Cas9-mutated knock-in mice harboring the human mutation in the mouse ortholog recapitulated core behavioral features of hyperactivity. Symptoms were modified by methylphenidate, the most commonly prescribed therapeutic for ADHD. The mutated mice exhibited impaired presynaptic vesicle clustering, attenuated evoked transmitter release and decreased spontaneous release. Specific downstream molecular pathways were affected in both the ventral midbrain and prefrontal cortex, with reduced tyrosine hydroxylase expression and dopamine levels. We thus delineate roles for CDH2-related pathways in the pathophysiology of ADHD.

    Many already has deduced that a physical flaw was causing ADHD symptoms. It only made sense. More break downs will be discovered as scientists zero in on brain structure due to this breakthrough discovery. The Decade of the Brain continues to reveal astounding information about the most complex 3lbs of matter on earth. We are on the verge of the most exciting science of all time. How the brain works, and doesn’t.

  • They have 15,600 appointments with patients on average per year. What should the maximum number of scripts she can write for stimulants be each year?
    The date was Oct 13 2015.

    Writing 2000 plus rx’s for stimulants per year has no bearing on the fact that ADHD is a damnable, confusing, complex, real and most often treatable through medication that I can see. Thank heaven doctors are treating so many people who suffer horribly from it while undiagnosed and untreated. There is hope now that it is being recognized and addressed for the monster it is and people are finding relief for it, building self-esteem and being given a second chance to do all the things they could not do.

  • Dr. Hickey, I’ll give you a tip. Start with the 3/15/2015 Newsweek issue and this article:

    Water Fluoridation Linked to Higher ADHD Rates
    BY DOUGLAS MAIN ON 3/10/15 AT 2:44 PM EDT
    RTR24P48
    A glass of tap water in New York.
    SHANNON STAPLETON / REUTERS

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
    New research shows there is a strong correlation between water fluoridation and the prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, or ADHD, in the United States.

    It’s the first time that scientists have systematically studied the relationship between the behavioral disorder and fluoridation, the process wherein fluoride is added to water to prevent cavities.

    The study, published in the journal Environmental Health, found that states with a higher portion of artificially fluoridated water had a higher prevalence of ADHD. This relationship held up across six different years examined. The authors, psychologists Christine Till and Ashley Malin at Toronto’s York University, looked at the prevalence of fluoridation by state in 1992 and rates of ADHD diagnoses in subsequent years.

    “States in which a greater proportion of people received artificially-fluoridated water in 1992 tended to have a greater proportion of children and adolescents who received ADHD diagnoses [in later years], after controlling for socioeconomic status,” Malin says. Wealth is important to take into account because the poor are more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD, she says. After income was adjusted for, though, the link held up.

    NEWSWEEK NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP >
    Take Delaware and Iowa, for instance. Both states have relatively low poverty rates but are heavily fluoridated; they also have high levels of ADHD, with more than one in eight kids (or 14 percent) between the ages of four and 17 diagnosed.

    In the study, the scientists produced a predictive model which calculated that every one percent increase in the portion of the U.S. population drinking fluoridated water in 1992 was associated with 67,000 additional cases of ADHD 11 years later, and an additional 131,000 cases by 2011, after controlling for socioeconomic status.

    “The results are plausible, and indeed meaningful,” says Dr. Philippe Grandjean, a physician and epidemiologist at Harvard University. This and other recent studies suggest that we should “reconsider the need to add fluoride to drinking water at current levels,” he adds.

    Thomas Zoeller, a scientist at UMass-Amherst who studies endocrine disruptors—chemicals that interfere with the activity of the body’s hormones, something fluoride has been shown to do—says that this is “an important observation in part because it is a first-of-a-kind. Given the number of children in the U.S. exposed to fluoridation, it is important to follow this up.” Since 1992, the percentage of the U.S. population that drinks fluoridated water has increased from 56 percent to 67 percent, during which time the percentage of children with an ADHD diagnosis has increased from around seven percent to more than 11 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    NEWSWEEK SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS >
    RTX146EG
    NACHO DOCE / REUTERS
    Others felt more strongly. “The numbers of extra cases associated with a one percent increase in the 1992 artificial fluoridation [figures] are huge,” says William Hirzy, an American University researcher and former risk assessment scientist at the Environmental Protection Agency, who is also a vocal opponent of fluoridation. “In short, it clearly shows that as artificial water fluoridation increases, so does the incidence of ADHD.”

    But scientists were quick to point out that this is just one study, and doesn’t prove that there is necessarily a causal link between fluoridation and ADHD. They also noted a number of important limitations: Individual fluoride exposures weren’t measured, ADHD diagnoses weren’t independently verified and there may be other unknown confounding factors that explain the link.

    Dr. Benedetto Vitiello, a researcher at the National Institutes of Health, says that the link between the two may not be a causal one and could be explained by regional or cultural factors. Charles Poole, an epidemiologist at the University of North Carolina, says that this research suggests fluoride should be more carefully studied, but doesn’t show much of anything by itself. “I think the authors were quite cautious in their interpretation… and [accurate] in their statement of the study’s limitations,” he says. “So it would be ludicrous to draw a strong conclusion based on this study alone.”

    Nevertheless, previous research has suggested that there may be several mechanisms by which fluoride could interfere in brain development and play a role in ADHD, says Dr. Caroline Martinez, a pediatrician and researcher at New York’s Mount Sinai Hospital.

    Animal studies in the 1990s by researcher Phyllis Mullenix, at the Harvard-affiliated Forsyth Research Institute, showed that rats exposed to fluoride in the womb were much more likely to behave in a hyperactive manner later in life. This could be due to direct damage or alteration to the development of the brain. (Mullenix’s adviser told her she was “jeopardizing the financial support” of her institution by “going against what dentists and everybody have been publishing for fifty years, that [fluoride] is safe and effective,” and she was fired shortly after one of her seminal papers was accepted for publication, according to Grandjean and a book by investigative journalist Christopher Bryson called The Fluoride Deception.)

    Multiple studies also suggest that kids with moderate and severe fluorosis—a staining and occasional mottling of the teeth caused by fluoride—score lower on measures of cognitive skills and IQ. According to a 2010 CDC report, a total of 41 percent of American youths ages 12 to 15 had some form of fluorosis. Another study showed structural abnormalities in aborted fetuses from women in an area of China with high naturally occurring levels of fluoride.

    There have also been about 40 studies showing that children born in areas home to water with elevated levels of this chemical (higher than the concentrations used in U.S. water fluoridation) have lower-than-normal IQs. Grandjean and colleagues reviewed 27 such studies that were available in 2012, concluding that all but one of them showed a significant link; children in high fluoride areas had IQs that were, on average, seven points below those of children from areas with low concentrations of the substance.

    One recent small study of fewer than 1,000 people in New Zealand suggested that water fluoridation didn’t decrease IQ. But that study had some serious errors, according to Grandjean, who writes that “a loss of 2-3 IQ points could not be excluded by their findings.” And only a small percentage of people in the study actually lived all their lives in areas without fluoridation, and even less didn’t use fluoride toothpaste, severely limiting the validity and relevance of the findings, he says.

    About 90 percent of the fluoride that is added to the water takes the form not of pharmaceutical grade sodium fluoride but of a chemical called fluorosilicic acid (or a salt formed using the acid). This material is a byproduct of phosphate fertilizer manufacturing, according to the CDC. Several studies have suggested that this form of fluoride can leach lead from pipes, says Steve Patch, at UNC-Asheville. Other work shows that children in fluoridated areas have elevated blood lead levels, and fluoride may also increase the absorption of lead into the body, says Bruce Lanphear, an epidemiologist at Simon Fraser University. Lead itself is a potent neurotoxin and has been shown to play a role in ADHD, Lanphear adds.

    There is also good evidence the fluoride impairs the activity of the thyroid gland, which is important for proper brain development, says Kathleen Thiessen, a senior scientist at the Oak Ridge Center for Risk Analysis, which does human health risk assessments for a variety of environmental contaminants. This could indirectly explain how the chemical could impair attentional abilities, she says.
    Philippe Grandjean is an adjunct professor at the Harvard School of Public Health. (Philippe Grandjean)

    New research finds exposure to fluoride in drinking water and several other common chemicals in early life diminishes brain function in children. Study lead author, Philippe Grandjean, tells host Steve Curwood fluoride, flame retardants, pesticides and and fuel additives may be affecting children’s intelligence.
    RELATED STORIES
    Water Fluoridation May Increase Risk of Underactive Thyroid Disorder
    Just last month, a study was published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, which found that there were nine percent more cases of hypothyroidism, or underactive thyroid, in fluoridated versus non-fluoridated locations in England.

    “Fluoride appears to fit in with a pattern of other trace elements such as lead, methylmercury, arsenic, cadmium and manganese—adverse effects of these have been documented over time at exposures previously thought to be ‘low’ and ‘safe,'” Martinez says.

    Grandjean concurs, citing a 2014 study he co-authored with researcher Philip Landrigan in The Lancet that characterizes fluoride as a developmental neurotoxin. Others, like Lanphear, prefer to call the chemical a “suspected developmental neurotoxin.” One problem, he says, is that there is no formal process for determining whether or not something is toxic to the brain.

    The CDC declined to comment on the study, but maintains the fluoridation is “safe and effective,” and calls fluoridation one of the “ten great public health achievements” of the twentieth century for its role in preventing tooth decay. The American Dentistry Association says that the process reduces decay rates by 25 percent. It should be noted, though, that in recent decades rates of cavities have declined by similar amounts in countries with and without fluoridation—and the United States is one of the few Western countries besides Ireland and Australia that fluoridate the water of a majority of the populace.

    Limitations aside, the study suggests that there is a pressing need to do more research on the neurotoxicity of fluoride, Lanphear says. In fact, every single researcher contacted said that fluoridation should be better studied to understand its toxicity and low-dose effects on the brain. Some deemed the lack of research on the chemical concerning and surprising, given how long it’s been around—fluoride was first added to water supplies beginning after World War II.

    Regarding whether or not fluoridation is a sound public health practice, he says that he “can’t make that decision for the public, but I’d certainly recommend that more studies are done, in an urgent fashion.”

  • In general, “ADHD” is essentially a lack of personal discipline. And people who lack personal discipline often struggle with the demands of life.`

    I challenge that conclusion and I’ll raise several. There is not a single drop of evidence proving that statement is true. Further, there isn’t a shred of evidence that in general tems parents are to blame across the board as Dr. Hiclkey claims. Parents are not to blame, though they can make an environment which is toxic and that makes everything more difficult for children. It is pure speculation on his part that a lack of training during a child’s youth is the basis overall for ADHD. Mcrea’s kids grew up in a wonderfully nurturing and structured environment, yet they posed enormous problems. Why? Obviously, we are born with predispositions.

    Explain, Doctor, if you don’t mind, the results of Birk’s work.

  • Not “a systematic, scientifically controlled way”

    Research on long-term effectiveness
    There are a number of studies that follow children for longer periods, even into adulthood, but the kids in these studies are not being treated in

    {a systematic, scientifically controlled way}

    so the results are not conclusive.

    Bob, would you consider writing up a thorough review of the breakthrough news that, “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice”

    Thanks

    This is a star studded group of experts extraordinaire: D. Halperin, A. Stavsky, R. Kadir, M. Drabkin, O. Wormser, Y. Yogev, V. Dolgin, R. Proskorovski-Ohayon, Y. Perez, H. Nudelman, O. Stoler, B. Rotblat, T. Lifschytz, A. Lotan, G. Meiri, D. Gitler & O. S. Birk

  • Facts?

    Quote them, please. How much damage have prescribed stimulants caused?

    How much good have they done, these stimulants helping people to see for the first time in their lives? What do you suppose that was like?

  • “In any case, lots of good medications become ineffective eventually,” adds Michael Milham, MD, PhD…that doesn’t mean we don’t use them for as long as they work.”

    “The largest of the controlled studies, called the MTA (or Multi-Modal Treatment Study of ADHD) study, treated nearly 600 children in the late 1990s for 14 months. The longest treated over 100 kids for 2 years. Both found that kids treated with stimulant medications had their symptoms significantly reduced, and the effect was more powerful than in kids treated with behavioral therapy.”

  • But, it is medicine for the ADHD afflicted individual. Why don’t we listen to them? They are the “spoken about” sufferers. When was the last time a major newspaper or network gave an adult with ADHD the opportunity to share with the world what it was like before treatment, how their life changed with treatment anf how they are doing at the present? Quite a few have a tale to tell of tragic misunderstandings, profound helplessness and an almost lethal loneliness. They are used to having no one Really listen to them. They came through hell and had a breakthrough that is quite thrilling. They are sharp, articulate, often very funny.

    Keep in mind, if one stimulant begins to lose its effacy, they can use a different one, change the dosage, increase exercise, or reduce their workload–persish the thought, right? They often feel obligated to make up for decades of failures and lost opportunities. One stimulant acts like a dam in the synapse, blocking and loading up dopamine to be released. Another acts as a flood, pushing more dopamine like a wave into where it is needed.
    With Birks’ incredible discovery ADHD will undergo massive new studies, more meds will be developed, better testing equipment, more ACCURATE results

  • A Destructive Psychiatric Hoax
    Dr. Phil,
    Please name say 100 people who were destroyed by ADHD. Thanks
    Left undiagnosed it is destructive.
    Who is destroyed, if we take it seriously?
    There are many good, decent, intelligent, hardworking, well-informed psychiatrists who believe the evidence proving it is a bio-chemical problem, is overwhelming.
    I introduced evidence that it is biochemically based. It is undeniable.
    It responds to treatment. Long term studies done properly, which are very expensive and difficult to do, show its efficacy. Many LT studies lack credibility. Many participants dropped out. Many were hard to find. Many did not continue to take their meds as prescribed and the long-term outcomes, of tests performed according to high standards, though favorable, have nothing to do with the fact that ADHD is real.

  • Published: 26 October 2021
    “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice”
    D. Halperin, A. Stavsky, R. Kadir, M. Drabkin, O. Wormser, Y. Yogev, V. Dolgin, R. Proskorovski-Ohayon, Y. Perez, H. Nudelman, O. Stoler, B. Rotblat, T. Lifschytz, A. Lotan, G. Meiri, D. Gitler & O. S. Birk

    CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function CAUSES ADHD

  • Among men, the crime rate
    was reduced by 32% (P<0.001) during treatment
    periods, and the rate reduction ranged from 17 to
    46% in all nine sensitivity analyses (in which the
    comparison was significant in eight). We observed
    a similar association among women, with a reduction in the crime rate of 41% (P<0.001) during
    treatment periods.

  • “The effectiveness of stimulants in treating ADHD has been well documented in randomized clinical trials.” The NEJM

    You are right doctor. The most prestigious medical journal in the world agrees with you..
    You have the most articulate, informed, researched point of view and decades of experience. Obviously, you are a very bright man with a top notch education. I am certain you have a large number of grateful and delighted, loyal patients. The NEJM confirms your position and that of many others. The folks I know who take their meds as prescribed (which includes remaining on them without discontinuing them for years on their own) can barely contain their joy and gratitude for the staggering improvements in their lives.
    If there wasn’t a flaw of some kind in the biochemistry of the afflicted, the medicine wouldn’t work. It targets neurotransmitters. There is no reason to believe that our brains run perfectly. Every physical component of our bodies is subject to failure and decay.

    Have you heard the very latest news? Some brilliant, brilliant Israelis just published the results of their exhaustive research and concluded, “CDH2 mutation affecting N-cadherin function causes attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in humans and mice” Hallowell basically said, “Of course. It is just further proof of what we already know.”
    These people did all the the work: D. Halperin, A. Stavsky, R. Kadir, M. Drabkin, O. Wormser, Y. Yogev, V. Dolgin, R. Proskorovski-Ohayon, Y. Perez, H. Nudelman, O. Stoler, B. Rotblat, T. Lifschytz, A. Lotan, G. Meiri, D. Gitler & O. S. Birk

  • I think you might enjoy these stats:

    What is the mortality rate of aspirin?
    Mortality rate was 5.57% (95% CI = 4.9-6.7), and 5.62% (95% CI = 4.8-6.8) in study 1 and study 2, respectively. Death rate attributed to NSAID/aspirin use was between 21.0 and 24.8 cases/million people, respectively, or 15.3 deaths/100,000 NSAID/aspirin users.

    Nothing is a lethal as birth. Birth will kill everyone on our planet. Billions and billions

  • Today’s DSM, and the psych drugs it mandates, are infinitely more insidious than the witch hunter’s manual, and the Nazi holocaust, combined.

    Would you mind defining “mandate” as used is this context?

    “A love for money is a root of all kinds of trouble” is more accurate. How do you eliminate this evil?

  • You assert that “It has been proven again and again that people with ADD have ‘different’ brains and literally cannot pay attention to certain stimuli no matter what they do.” If you would cite me the references to support this assertion, I would be happy to take a look, and if your assertion is founded, I will acknowledge this in a subsequent post. Dr. Hickey

    ADHD is the inability to focus attention as needed.

  • “we had one doctor, identified through a register here, who had more than 2000 ‘patient’s’ (in a one year period) he was prescribing stimulants to for ADHD…”

    What’s his name? Where was this and when, do you recall? What does that have to do with the topic?

  • “Sometimes, we are so sick, we can’t sin.”
    “Obviously for any of these behaviors to occur, there has to be corresponding neural activity. But there is no necessity that the neural activity is diseased or malfunctioning in any way.” Dr. Hickey

    Neurons become diseased. Damaged neurons take choice away. We see the results all the time

  • “Trying to make a child believe that they have something wrong with them is most certainly emotional child abuse.”

    Do believe millions of parents have done just that? How many parents did not accuse their children of having fake illnesses? 10? 5? Any? out of millions?

  • “Mad in America hosts blogs by a diverse group of writers.”

    You mean background, geographic areas where they were raised, their occupations, ages, things of that nature, I believe. There is no diversity as far as holding psychiatry responsible for the “epidemic” at least that I’ve noticed. Is there one psychiatrist, is there anyone at all, ever, who writes for Mad who supports psychiatry?

  • Flouridation began in the U.S. in 1945. Based on the Literature, there is a direct conection between the prevalence of ADHD and the consumption of flouridated water. The research was published over 5 years ago.

    We evaluated 150 adolescents, 50 each from three different areas with water fluoride ranging from < 2.5 ppm to ~ 10 ppm (Scott–Sanchis method). We observed that in ~ 10 ppm group, clinically none had normal Dean fluorosis index and only 4% had above average intelligence scores on Bhatia Battery, as compared to 48% in ~ 5 ppm group.

    There were significant differences on one-way ANOVA for attention/concentration (F = 13.879; p = 0.000), verbal memory (F = 36.197; p = 0.000), working memory (F = 3.078; p = 0.014) apart from IQ (F = 12.938; p = 0.000) suggesting the inverse relationship. Further, significant (p < 0.001) spectral progression of psychopathology was evident in domains of ADHD, childhood disruptive mood disorder, persistent defiant disorders, and specific arithmetic scholastic skills disorders.

  • Exactly. Based on Dr. Hickey’s well researched, informed accusations many/every psychiatrist in the United States must be arrested for attempted murder and conspiracy to commit First Degree Murder and First Degree Murder. Intentionally, with malice aforethought, conspiring across state and international lines and borders, is terrorism. Murder, of millions of innocents, in the first degree during non-war time is among the worst crimes of all. The World Court has at least partial jurisdiction, I believe.

  • “It allows parents to evade any blame for their kid’s failing to become mature/responsible, since it wasn’t their fault, but merely “symptoms of brain disease”. Telling people what they want to hear has been very lucrative for psychiatry.”

    How would you help a child who presents with hyperactivity, does not pay attention and is failing in school. Physical exam reveals nothing abnormal and there are no signs or history of abuse, etc. IOW, ADHD symptomology present for several years beginning in third grade, is the overriding concern.

    Can you share what course of action you would take to improve his school performance and his interaction with peers?

  • “Nowhere does Whitaker include references to the many studies showing structural brain abnormalities, neurological abnormalities, and neuropsychological deficits in individuals with schizophrenia who had never been treated with any medication.

    Read more at: https://mentalillnesspolicy.org/myths/mad-in-america.html

    He also includes statements that are patently erroneous. For example, he claims that “even moderately high doses of haloperidol were linked to violent behavior,” when, in fact, studies have shown that haloperidol and other antipsychotics decrease violent behavior in individuals with schizophrenia. Many of Whitaker’s errors originate in his liberal footnoting of Dr. Peter Breggin, who has acknowledged having received support from Scientology, as a source.

    Read more at: https://mentalillnesspolicy.org/myths/mad-in-america.html

  • “Psychiatry is nothing more than legalized drug-pushing. There is not one shred of intellectual or scientific validity to their so-called taxonomy. They invent these so-called illnesses to expand their turf, and then liberalize the criteria to expand it further.” Dr. Hickey

    You accuse psychiatry of illegal, immoral, deceptive, racketeering, interstate conspiracy to defraud, and premeditated conspiracy to commit mass murder.

    Dr., where is the evidence? Would you mind presenting it? From what you say all psychiatrists are wanted felons. Any psychiatrist could substitute her name for psychiatry. How do you condemn all of them, repeatedly, when you don’t know all of them?

  • Is There Long-Term Benefit From Stimulant Treatment for ADHD?
    Steven R. Pliszka, M.D.

    Stimulant medications have been used to treat symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) for over 80 years, longer than the use of antibiotics to treat infection (1). Based on data from over 6 million individuals in an insurance database, the 2008 annual prevalence for filled stimulant prescriptions was found to be 4.6% for children ages 6–12 years, 3.7% for adolescents (13–18 years), and 1.6% for young adults (19–24 years) (2). These figures are in line with data from other studies (3) and are below the estimated 7% 1-year prevalence of childhood ADHD (4). The short-term efficacy of stimulants in ADHD is well established (5), yet despite eight decades of clinical use, there continues to be angst over it. Reviews call attention to the fact that there have been no long-term studies of stimulant use beyond 1 year (6), and this fact is often brought up by the lay media in discussions of the treatment of ADHD (7).

    Previously, the Multimodality Treatment of ADHD study (MTA) found that after 14 months, structured medication management was superior to behavioral treatment alone or treatment as usual in the community (8). After the first year, all participants in the MTA sought whatever treatment was available, and as a result, the exposure to medication treatment was highly variable as the years wore on. The most recent follow-up examined medication usage, ADHD outcome, and growth at age 25 (9). Medication usage was assessed by interviewing the patient or caretakers—always an issue, as patients tend to overreport their adherence to medication regimens. The MTA defined being on “minimal” medication as taking 10 mg of methylphenidate (or its equivalent) per day more than 50% of the time. Based on this definition, the MTA sample was broken down into three groups: negligible (always below the minimum at all time points interviewed), inconsistent (below the minimum in most follow-ups), and consistent (above the minimum at all time points). This latter group consisted of only 35 individuals, or 7.3% of the sample. Not surprisingly, given this very low medication exposure, no relationship was found between ADHD outcome and medication usage.

    The MTA could not address the question of the efficacy of stimulant medication use beyond 1 year, so there is a need to reliably establish the long-term benefits of stimulant use in ADHD treatment. There is also the practical clinical question as to how long to maintain a child or adolescent with ADHD on stimulants. A common question that is asked is whether the patient has “grown out of” his or her ADHD, such that the medication can be discontinued. In this issue of the Journal, Matthijssen et al. (10) report on the first double-blind placebo-controlled discontinuation study in ADHD patients who were continuously treated with methylphenidate for at least 2 years. The participants had to be on a stable regimen of either 36 mg or 54 mg of extended-release methylphenidate for the past 4 weeks; they then entered a blinded study in which they were randomly assigned either to remain on this dosage for 7 weeks or to undergo a 3-week taper to placebo followed by 4 weeks on placebo. Teacher, parent, and clinician assessments (all blind to study group) were performed at baseline and at 7 weeks.

    Although the design was to enroll a sample of 120 participants, with 60 in each group, only 94 were enrolled, because of recruitment difficulties. As the authors state, “Many patients we approached did not want to participate in our discontinuation trial, as they argued that they ‘knew it still worked,’ based on experiences of stopping briefly or when they forgot to take their medication for a day.” This will not come as a surprise to clinicians, as many parents whose children have more severe ADHD are unequivocal about the medication’s efficacy and maintain their children on medication on weekends and during school vacations. At the end of the 7-week trial, 40.4% of the patients in the discontinuation group worsened, and only 15.9% of those who continued medication worsened. Furthermore, the authors found that the effect of continuing methylphenidate was significant in the younger participants (below the median age of 13.8 years) but not in the older group. This finding might be explained because ADHD symptoms may be more subtle in older patients and it may take longer for relapse to occur. Patients in the discontinuation group had worse scores on the ADHD Rating Scale, as rated by both parents (effect size=−0.23) and teachers (effect size=−0.52). The difference between parent and teacher ratings is also not surprising given the higher cognitive demands of the classroom. It is of note that 16% of the participants who remained on their stable medication regimen worsened, which is likely due to the “nocebo effect” of believing that one might be on a placebo.

    Clearly, this study demonstrates that stimulant administration remains generally effective over 2 years of treatment; but what about the fact that 60% of those who were transitioned to placebo “did not worsen”? Will this finding result in headlines announcing that “60% of children with ADHD can be taken off medication after 2 years?” This conclusion would be premature, to say the least. All clinicians have had the experience of parents who have not restarted stimulant medication at the start of the school year, only to be called after the first 6-week grading period to restart medication because their child was failing several classes. The authors are correct in their conclusion that patients with ADHD should be assessed at least annually to see if discontinuation is possible, particularly for adolescents who seem to be functioning well when off medication. The medication should be restarted at the first sign of relapse.

    Multiple other studies using large national or insurance databases are beginning to establish the long-term benefit of psychopharmacological treatment of ADHD. Relative to periods off medication, ADHD patients on medication have fewer motor vehicle accidents (11), have a lower risk of traumatic brain injury (12), are less likely to engage in criminal activity (13), have lower rates of suicidal behavior (14), and have lower rates of substance abuse (15). Thus the answer to the question “Is there long-term benefit from stimulant treatment for ADHD” is a definite “Yes!”

    Department of Psychiatry, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, Tex.

  • Dr Berezin, if we remove all the brain tissue from the skull, depression will disappear; personality disorders, ADHD, bi-polar, anger, they won’t bother us a bit. Or say we remove all the neurotransmitters, same thing. Deprive our grey matter of oxygen for 8 minutes and mood disorders vanish.
    Logic tells me with the few neurons I have left, that the brain must have something to do with us, you know?

  • ADHD was first identified in 1902 by British pediatrician Sir George Still. He described the condition as “an abnormal defect of moral control in children.” He found that some affected children could not control their behavior in the same way a typical child would. He did note, however, that these children were still intelligent.

  • “Are stimulants safer than aspirin? Unequivocally, yes. Web MD lists 38 side effects of aspirin and many of them are potentially fatal. Taken daily as many do for various ailments, aspirin’s most lethal side effect is bleeding. It can lead to brain hemorrhage, bleeding in the stomach, hepatitis hemolytic anemia, decreased platelet cell ability to clot. Kidney difficulties, seizures, and life threatening allergic reactions are amongst other difficulties.”

    Stuart L. Kaplan, M.D., is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Penn State College of Medicine.

  • “Look, we’re not going to agree on this. It’s a philosophical problem, not a scientific one. You have a set of assumptions, mostly that kids learn best by doing what they’re expected to in a regular classroom…”

    Learning in a classroom stinks.

    “it is the adults’ job to figure out the best setting for children to learn in and that adapting your approach to the children’s needs…” Amen!

    I believe in doing everything possible to avoid medication. Special schools, the best teachers, experiential education, all the latest techniques, everything not to resort to meds.

    I am a teatotaler, strictly. I hate what drugs/alcohol do to people. I don’t drink, smoke, drug, eat fatty foods, I exercise, blah, blah, blah.

    I believe at this very momenbt there is a child somewhere who can’t do his schoolwork. He cannot learn. He fakes paying attention. He nods his head on the inflection of a voice. He smiles when someone nods his head. He smiles when he sees that others smiled at something. He compensates and has no idea what’s going on. He cannot follow directions; he doesn’t hear them. He’s tuned out and drifted off somewhere. He catches a word or two occassionally. He gets by the best he can. He simply cannot pay attention and he’s learning to despise himself. He is bored to death, almost literally. He assumes he must be as rotten as his folks tell him daily and his teachers reinforce constantly. Kids make fun of him and he gets into trouble and he has absolutely no idea, none, what he did wrong. He’s all alone and afraid and desperate.

    I want him to know there’s hope. He is not at fault. He’s a good kid. Kids with ADHD often have big hearts and are extremely empathetic.

    “People with ADD often have a special feel for life, a way of seeing right into the heart of matters, while others have to reason their way along methodically.”

    ADHD AND EMPATHY
    The upside of being a person who feels so deeply, with such a high capacity for empathy, is that you’re often the best friend/parent/sibling/colleague, etc. that a person can have. You can read people well and understand what they’re feeling even before they express it.

    – Dr. Hallowell

  • Steve, where did you get the impression I oppose “open classrooms”? In many ways our public school system is a disaster. We need all kinds of improvements.
    I built my own house. Had no experience. I read up on it. It was a lot of work but most people have the ability. I wanted to take what I learned and teach it in the field through schools as an experiential classroom. We would build a house together. To the extent that happened, the juvenile delinquents had a ball. They loved it.

    I don’t want children or adults to be trapped by a very damaging disorder when there is help. It is painful for me to think that some may never know they had a true disorder. They are not to blame for their endless series of failures. It wasn’t their fault. Two nurses wrote a book, “You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Crazy, Or Stupid?”

  • “why is it that study after study shows no improvements in long-term outcomes for medicated vs. non-medicated “ADHD”

    “Is there long term benefit from stimulant treatment for ADHD?
    Thus the answer to the question “Is there long-term benefit from stimulant treatment for ADHD” is a definite “Yes!” Department of Psychiatry, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, Tex.Sep 1, 2019”

  • “How on Earth do you know that my children were “not as limited as many?” How could you possibly know that without meeting my children…”

    I’m so glad you asked that question.
    Here’s how anyone can come to that conclusion, Steve. No presumption on the part of anyone. It is simple. Your kids were able to respond.

    Blind people cannot see. No matter what they do or anyone else does, they cannot see. If a person has ADHD, he cannot improve his capacity to focus. Some suffer from severe ADHD. There is a continuum. Some have it mildly. Some are very intelligent. Some are below average. But, nothing they do changes their inborn neurologic flaw. Training, doesn’t change a thing, nor education, nor anything. Training education, support can make it easier to use whatever capacity the person has, but the flaw in our bodies remains. This is a neurologic deficit which means it is an abnormal function of a body area. This altered function is due to injury of the brain, spinal cord, muscles, or nerves.

    Obviously, you disagree strongly. You insist no bio markers exist. That is not true, IMO. That’s why misdiagnosis is common. It is tricky. We know very, very little on the molecular level which disturbances yield.

  • “There is, in my view, nothing offensive in the article. There is a widespread tendency among psychiatric adherents to confuse offense with disagreement. “I disagree with this” becomes “This is offensive.” If you feel that there is some sentence or passage that is offensive, please point it out and I will gladly take another look.” Dr. Hickey

    You also said this: “You assert that “It has been proven again and again that people with ADD have ‘different’ brains and literally cannot pay attention to certain stimuli no matter what they do.” If you would cite me the references to support this assertion, I would be happy to take a look, and if your assertion is founded, I will acknowledge this in a subsequent post.” Dr. Hickey

    I think it is only right that you reference your sources which document that “psychiatric adherents” confuse offense with disagreement. Regardless, she said she was ioffended. You offended her. She Felt offended. A book isn’t going to change how shje felt. Averages, statistics, manuals, theories, intellect, will not change how she felt when she read how you condemned people like her, that most people like her don’t have self-discipline.

  • “I do agree 100% that different learning styles should be respected, and that more discipline to force “ADHD” kids into regular classroom environments is stupid. Of course, the real purpose of “medication” is to do exactly that, to force kids who don’t fit to modify their personalities and learning styles so as to be less inconvenient for the adults involved.” Steve Mcrea

    That is insulting, unfair and nasty. You are condemning scores of people you’ve never met who worked just as hard as you and your family to help their children. That is a terrible thing to say.

    Medication is intended to help the individual to pay attention. Then, he/she can learn through whatever style he/she may have.

  • “In general, “ADHD” is essentially a lack of personal discipline.” Dr. Hickey

    Doctor, would you explain to us how you came to this conclusion? I know people with ADHD symptomatology who are self-disciplined and it made a huge difference for them. They were very bright and had very mild symptoms. Others I’ve known couldn’t organize themselves no matter how hard they tried–until they took medication.

  • “Others are passionately interested in their children’s welfare, but utterly clueless as to how to train them.” Dr. Hickey

    Dr. Hickey, where can parents find the information you rely upon which will make them better parents? What sources do you recommend? Why did dedicated, educated parents like Mr and Mrs Mcrea have to work so hard to train their children?

  • The diagnosis rests upon a careful history taken from the identified patient as well as at least one other person. This could be a parent, spouse, sibling, or close friend, as well as, if possible, teacher comments.

    “And it needs to be noted particularly that since 1994, the only requirement under this item for adults and adolescents is that they experience feelings of restlessness!” Dr. Hickey.
    That is incorrect. See below

    That is one of 5 symptoms and the symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsivity must have been present for at least 6 months, and they are inappropriate for developmental level. Also, they be present by age 12.

    As children grow older, they often develop strategies to help them control some of the more elementary forms of hyperactivity, but that uncomfortable urge to squirm and move about burns inside. Aerobically demaning activities often soothe that desire.

  • I love kids. I want the best for everyone of them. I don’t want any child to be harmed in any way, ever. That’s where I’m coming from. I don’t want all kids to be moulded into a certain type. Last thing on my mind. I do want kids to reach their full potential, whatever that may be. A mind is a terrible thing to waste and if a child or an adult cannot process what is taking place around him, that limits his options to do and to be what he can do and who he wants to become. If orange juice was as effective as meds seems to be, I’d be advocating consuming thousands of gallons!

  • You didn’t answer my questions.

    “There is also an abundance of research going back to the 60’s that demonstrates clearly that children who are habitually inattentive, impulsive, and hyperactive even to an extreme degree, can be trained readily to behave in a more productive and less disruptive fashion”

    Please cite 3 documents which demonstrate what you claim, please.
    What is meant by “more productive”? For herself or for others she is not disrupting? I am interested primarily in the documentation which shows that extreme examples of children manifesting hyperactivity, a lack of concentration and impulsivity are “readily” trained to be more productive. I would like to see how they quantified, specifically, their increased productivity.
    Also, a child can be scared into being quiet. That is true and rather obvious. Remove the immediate threat and what happens? I will state with confidence that those children learned just as much when they were not trained. ADHD is a biological/chemical/electrical/organic malfunction of the brain and training will not and cannot improve concentration. A business advertising that claim got into hot water and had to stop.
    In addition, would you cite the supporting research which shows that parents prior to the 1960’s knew how to raise their children better than succeeding generations, please.
    Why don’t those “ADHD” children snap out of their funk immediately and permanently? Did something damage the structure of their brains? What is holding them back? Why do the majority of ADHDers respond immediately to the medicinal properties of stimulants and begin to concentrate instantly?

    Thank you in advance for any cooperation

  • Statements here are from MIA’s paper on long term impact of ADHD drugs.

    The “Reply” button is not available often when others are directing questions my way. I cannot respond directly. I mentioned this before.

    “However, the drugs have not been shown to improve classroom performance…”

    Source, please

    “The APA first created a diagnosis called Attention Deficit Disorder in 1980, when it published the third edition of its DSM.”

    It was discovered and called something else, MBD, over one hundred years ago.

    “Given that there is no biological marker for the disorder”

    there is now

    “there is an obvious subjective element to making the diagnosis. What may be seen as a problem in one setting—by a parent, teacher, or pediatrician—may be considered normal behavior in another situation.” for example?

    “whereas 13% of elementary-school children in the United States are said to have ADHD…”
    Who says that? It is not the majority opinion.

    “only about 2% of children in the UK are seen as exhibiting attention-deficit type problems”
    reference please

    “The long-term effects of ADHD drugs on the brain are not well understood, or even well studied” You see, there are a range of opinions on this.

    “Is there long term benefit from stimulant treatment for ADHD?
    Thus the answer to the question “Is there long-term benefit from stimulant treatment for ADHD” is a definite “Yes!” Department of Psychiatry, UT Health San Antonio, San Antonio, Tex.Sep 1, 2019”

    Steve, I run across your opinions occassionally. I don’t know when you respond to something I’ve said to someone else. I notice you have not answered several questions I asked. People disagree about the long term benefits of treatment with meds.

    Why do you believe your kids needed (and received, thank heavens) extraordinary care?

  • Steve, why condemn others for insulting and condescending when you cheer on condescending and insulting comments? How do you suppose others feel who disagree with her point of view and when as a moderator you encourage it?

    Kids learn differently. But, if they can concentrate, they learn. When you cannot pay attention, you are at a big disadvantage.

    A REPLY button does not show up under your comments at times so I try to respond the best way I can

  • I cannot respond to your most recent criticism through the reply mechanism. so I’ll try here. I can see what you mean and I apologize for presenting my viewpoint in a condescending, dismissive fashion.

    WE disagree about the nature of this disorder. Your children were not as limited as many are and you did do a great job.

    Many children cannot, no matter what anyone else does or doesn’t do, pay attention. They are like legally blind people. Often, they respond to medication when nothing else works.

    That’s why I advocate for anything that will work to help them. ADHD is not just a matter of guessing. It is not loosely defined. It is not something that responds significantly, most of the time, to structure and training and carrots or jails.

    Many who comment here condemn anyone who doesn’t hate psychiatry and psychiatrists, including you. You are a cheerleader, regularly, for the most nasty and vicious and hateful participants. and You are not open minded. No offense Steve, but you, for some reason believe you have all the answers, but you don’t. No one does. What you accomplished with your kids is astonishing, but most kids are not your kids. I fear you lose sight of that. Many condemn parents who have tried very hard, including you. Many condemn teachers, some who don’t deserve it, you included.

    You suggest I like drugs. Caffeine is a drug don’t forget. I’ll tell you what I like best of all: to know that everyone who needs help gets it, whatever it is as long as it doesn’t do more harm than good and I know mant people who are different people today, so grateful for medication that saved their lives. I don’t see that you too are happy they have found such significant help. Why? Remember thius too. I was not directing my opinions at you. I think you are taking too personally differences of opinions, but I do apologize for implying you didn’t care about your own kids. Big oversight. Sorry bro.

  • “In short term studies, ADHD medications have been shown to be effective in reducing core ADHD symptoms, such as task irrelevant activity (e.g. finger-tapping, fidgetiness, and and off-task behaviors), and classroom disturbance.” MIA

    MIA recognizes ADHD exists and that the core symptoms respond favorably to medication. That is a bold thing to do.

    So, it is! and can be managed initially, through the use of medication. Unfortunately, they don’t mention what else is is included in the list of the core symptoms that improve: the child’s ability to pay attention. Most likely for the first time in her life! For The First Time in Her Life!
    The secondary benefits of medication are that the child’s behavior improves. Just like that, with no training, without instructions or anything else. That is certainly impressive, but again that is not what we hope to achieve ultimately for the child. Those are secondary matters. What MIA omits is by far the most important result, that is that the child’s brain starts to work. We are not drugging anyone. That is a perverse notion. We are giving the child the ability for the first time in her life to use her brain as intended, not to make her incoherent. Just the opposite. He can sit still and calmly participate in the school setting Because his brain can focus on what it is supposed to. That, to me, is miraculous. Nothing else is known to give that ability to anyone who cannot function due to ADHD. If someone is diagnosed with ADHD but does not need chemical intervention to gather, to focus on and to process information in order to manage her daily life within reasonable guidelines, they don’t need medicine.

    What MIA has made clear at the beginning is as follows. ADHD is.
    ADHD untreated is a nightmare.
    Treatment for ADHD works.

    Forget all the rest for a minute. For one minute concentrate your attention on what MIA just acknowledged! What MIA has just stated clearly, officially, and formally, is just this: ADHD responds to proper medical intervention.

    That is an excellent place to start a discussion and an analysis of what we can and need to do now. Children await our decisions. Their futures are are at stake every day.

    (When I go to edit my comments, the content shows up in a square outline and it doesn’t include the margins. They get cut off and I can’t see everything I’ve written.)

  • Steve, several times I have asked the person who wrote the particular comment for him or her to respond, not you. You are welcome to respond. I point this out for clarification. I hope the ones I asked questions will not be confused. I want their input, too.

  • You have drifted off the topic. I am not just discussing the origins of ADHD directly.
    If training is the answer as explained previously, I challenge that opinion through a few questions and examples. Bear in mind not every one who believes medication can be a valuable tool for many afflicted with this disorder is a cold blooded killer. Some of them love and care about children very sincerely. Not every argument they make in favor of using medication as called for and under the supervision of a competent, experienced, true-blue doct is made by greedy, psychopathic, crimminally minded, worthless, raving lunatics out to destroy children at any cost.

    “Drugging children” is a horrible term. It is misleading and wildly inappropriate. I don’t want to send anyone into a stupor. I don’t want to control any one. My hope is that medication can serve like a pair of glasses. That’s all. If someone doesn’t want improved vision, fine. Should every child who has debilitating problems with their eyesight be offered a vision test? Sure. Should all of them be forced to wear glasses? Of course not, but some believe so. They misinterpret the others’ intentions. Ascribing the worst, most immoral motives to just about everyone who views ADHD as a medical matter is a terrible mistake, for the CHILD.

  • Trained, experienced professional health care workers can spot illness that may be hidden to others. People work tirelessly to build defense mechanisms to mask their raw selves.
    I would would offer instead that our world is filled with people who have serious issues and there is much more awareness about these kinds of things today. So much more information is available today compared to 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 years ago.

    I think most of us are pretty good at mistreating others as a rule.