Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Comments by Amy Lowery

Showing 3 of 3 comments.

  • JeffreyC, I like your idea of categorizing comments by approval, disapproval, correction/addition. I think that is an excellent way to avoid mob rule.

    One of the reasons I have chosen not to comment in the past is precisely what you are describing, in that there seems to be a clique that always comments. If I express my thoughts and the collective experiences from my clients, several commenters give me the impression that if it doesn’t follow or embrace their views entirely, my comments are not seen as valid and they don’t want to hear it.

    It should go without saying that the experiences and views of ALL my clients, is something I value, honor and take very seriously. I also have the experiences of my mother and myself in dealing with psychiatrists (in my mother’s situation beginning in the 1980’s), but I won’t detail that here.

    I think you posited a great solution, which would allow people to choose what types of comments they want read.

  • Cloudhead, the part of my response that you chose to quote was incomplete and has nothing to do with the new comment policy on this site. Licensed social worker’s are bound to a code of ethics which includes a client’s or individuals right to self-determination.

    Maybe I should have clarified, and explained that portion of my response is not based on opinion, but hours of research in reading the DSM 5 field trial results which had very low kappa scores for inter-rater reliability. Also it is based on reading the entire RCT trials by drug companies for several psychotropic medications including SSRI’s and mood stabilizers, that never made it to the FDA yet were approved. The FDA only requires 50% efficacy over placebo, and does not require all RCT’s done by the pharma company for the drug. I also have read much of Robert Whitaker’s work, and watched several of his presentations which highlights even more research that he and others have done.

    My client’s telling me that something saved their life, is not my opinion, but theirs, which is what is most important. Many client’s have told me quite different stories and were clearly suffering from being on cocktails of psychotropic medications or being psychiatrically hospitalized without their consent, and that is just as important. Each person has a right to decide how they choose to live, what medications they take, and our laws in the U.S. vary by states, in terms of how and when a person can be hospitalized without their personal consent.

    The portion of my response that you did not quote and is based entirely on my opinion, is not entirely in disagreement with what you wrote about both sides being entitled to be expressed and based on their merits. I wrote at the beginning of my response:

    “I think anyone who frequents this site has valuable input to offer in the comments section. It’s set to be upvoted by other readers, not MIA, so I’m not anticipating any bias. Everyone gets a voice still, and this encourages meaningful dialogue.”

  • I agree Steve. I think anyone who frequents this site has valuable input to offer in the comments section. It’s set to be upvoted by other readers, not MIA, so I’m not anticipating any bias. Everyone gets a voice still, and this encourages meaningful dialogue. I am a social worker and as much disgust and outrage as I have for our current psychiatric and mental health systems, I personally cannot espouse abolishing it entirely. It is terribly flawed and based on little to no scientific evidence, but it has saved some of my clients lives. It needs a massive overhaul, and yes when human dignity and rights are taken away, this needs to stop. However, it depends on the individual and their current level of suffering. There are simply few if any alternatives right now. That is what I love about MIA. It’s a place to discuss this and find real world solutions and alternatives to a system that shows little to no signs right now of being legally or financially dismantled. But, if the system is circumvented, and practitioners have safe and effective alternatives to suggest to people seeking help, the status quo changes. If our current psychiatric system (medical-based but not medically sound or proven) doesn’t start to change it will lose its usage, credibility, and relevance. Ultimately it will lose its power to destroy, ruin, and traumatize people.