Friday, November 27, 2020

Comments by Syd Barrett

Showing 1 of 1 comments.

  • I was always afraid to register here, but just did so I could share some things about Julie’s life. We became friends around the time she was moving back to the states. I became concerned when I didn’t see any blog posts for a week, and was going to email her when I saw this post.

    Julie was so happy to be living independently. She had a separate house on a lot with a yard. She was wanting to buy a home.

    She was working as a substitute teacher in the local public schools. She loved being with the kids, and had good rapport with them. She was frustrated that they ended up mostly using her as an aide. She also was a phone rep for Nordstrom. The system kept her from the work world for so long, she was uninitiated about it. I remember how excited she was to get her first job, in a call center. She tried a couple of online jobs that were scammy and didn’t work out. She was reading drafts of books for authors through some website. She was in a bit of a jam; she had spent all her money on a scammy publicist for her new online pay TV channel, and had reported the guy, who was threatening to sue.

    A couple years ago she had cataract surgery on one eye, which gave her a new lease on life. She was almost blind at that point, and constantly losing things. She started running and competing in races, and was talking about buying a bicycle.

    It’s a shame her last book wasn’t quite finished. She only lived as long as she did because of the kidney health protocol she created and followed, which was going to be in the book about life after lithium. She refused the trap of dialysis.

    Julie was so tenacious and determined to be heard, and make a difference in people’s lives. Feisty would be the word. She was always starting new projects only to see them stumble, but never gave up.

    Her daily life was haunted by insomnia from neuroleptic damage. She was always exhausted, taking caffeine to make it through the days.

    Her relationship with her brothers was contentious at times. It was good to see the short obituary by her brother, a physics professor. They administered the trust fund from her parents, and doled it out in tiny dribs, just enough to keep her stressed out and poor. She hadn’t mentioned any more about that since she was working. She was afraid that they would have her put away. Seems like things had improved between them. I think they were happy to see how things were going with her lately.

    Julie loved her parents, who were very supportive of her. The shrinks insisted that they must had been abusive for her to be in the system.

    It was sad that the system stole her music from her. She was trained as a classical music composer, and played trumpet in the orchestra. She told me that she never listened to music anymore.

    I don’t think she was practicing her Jewish faith, but she mentioned a belief in a central deity or creator, “God” she called it.

    I am grateful to have known Julie. My life feels richer for it. I will always remember her.