Tuesday, December 6, 2022

Comments by Rose Yesha

Showing 15 of 15 comments.

  • I totally see your point, Frank. I respect all experiences. I think mental health should be inclusive of everyone’s journey. This was the best course of action for myself. I don’t feel my sanity (or that of the next person) should ever be a question of subjective diagnostic criteria! 🙂 The way in which one chooses to define their mental distress is a personal preference.

    Cheers,
    Rose

  • Rebel,
    It’s really no surprise that the human brain struggles to regain homeostasis after exposure to potent neurotoxins. This can present itself as OCD or any of the other hundred constructed diagnoses in the psychiatric bible of the DSM. I am infuriated when I hear of individuals who suddenly have bipolar when in actuality is mania set off by an ADE to SSRI’s. The list goes on and on. I am not sure why so many still find this concept controversial. Perhaps it is because society desperately wants to believe psychiatric drugs are medication that are “safe and effective”. While they may prove to have short term benefit for some, it is that psychotropics are capable of grave harm. We must continue to share our stories and advocate for informed consent.
    Cheers,
    Rose

  • Hi Steve,
    I totally agree with everything you have masterfully articulated here. It is so ridiculous that vulnerable patients are led to believe that they have a life-long brain disease. The orthodoxy of this approach is almost cult-like, with many forming entire identities around their disorders. Then organizations such as NAMI encouraging people to get mental health screenings, all the while being funded by big pharma. I can not take these popular mental health awareness months or suicide prevention days seriously. All I see is more advertisement opportunities for dangerous treatments!

    -Rose

  • Hi Fiachra,

    Thank you for your comment. I am so happy that you have gained your own insights into your history and have remained critical as to what the professionals wanted you to believe. I do believe I developed a drug induced OCD, as validated by my previous physician. It is a difficult reality, but the idea that I am ill or that this is a life-long condition now seems absolutely absurd. It sounds like you have maintained a high level of resilience after all that you have gone through. That is very inspiring! Thank you for reading.
    Cheers,
    Rose

  • Hi JAB,
    I am sorry that you suffered much of the same fate that so many of us have. I know what it is to revolve your life around your injury and the isolation that accompanies our invisible illness. The delicate dance is soul crushing and I now have years of being completely misunderstood by friends who are longer in my life. That’s so awesome that you play guitar! Music is a huge passion of mine and it has helped me a lot in my healing journey. We are never alone as long as we continue to find each other in community. Thank you so much for reading.
    Cheers,
    Rose

  • Hi there,

    Thank you for reading. Yes, it was absolutely a nightmare. I was grateful for my philosophy class in high school, as it seemed to give me an impetus to keep going at the time. I am a huge fan Dr. Healy and “Pharmageddon”. He has also given extremely world renowned lectures about PSSD, a condition virtually no one in the medical community ever discusses! I am so sad to learn about how such heros are often punished for exposing the truth and helping humanity in the most compassionate ways.

    The drop the disorder movement was one of my biggest inspirations for dropping the language of my own pathology. Before I came across that community, I did not even know it was a possibility to question your own diagnosis. That is how incarcerated I became by the system. As you know, we all become prisoners of sort with very little power once we enter the mental health system.

    I am so thankful for that encounter with my uber driver, I had virtually never really talked to anyone in real life who had side effects from psychiatric drugs like I did. We keep hearing how “rare” it is to be severely injured by medication, but judging at how many people we see in the support forums, we obviously know that is completely false. Our voices continue to be silenced, but I have hope that we will continue to take wins where we can. Many of those closest to me have had an “awakening” after seeing what I went through. On the flip side, many friends continue to believe in the false narratives of pathology and chemical imbalance. It is always a tug of war. We must continue to speak out! Thank you for reading.

    Warmly,
    Rose

  • Thank you for sharing your story, Rebel. It was not until I found the support groups that I realized how common intrusive thoughts were in psychiatric drug withdrawal. I had debated this idea with several psychologists and of course none of them believed that my condition had anything to do with the medication. I remember mentioning Dr. Peter Breggin to my last OCD “specialist” and he told me that he felt Dr. Breggin was controversial. That is when I knew I was in the wrong place and I quit OCD therapy for good. I am slowly healing, as you said, it is more of an adaptation at this point! It is hard to reckon with the lost years, but I am still grateful that there is a future ahead. Thanks for reading!
    Warmly,
    Rose

  • Hi Kalina,

    Once I was first diagnosed, I pretty much reached the end of the internet in searching for answers. I talked to world-class professionals who were so called “experts”. I found that none of them had any good answers. To their credit, many of them were well intentioned, but the current research on OCD is severely lacking. Many of the experts agreed that medication did not really help, yet, most of the people I met in the support groups were taking several. I found ERP to be extreme from the start, and I had other friends who suffered intensely because of being coerced by their therapists to keep engaging in therapy that was hurting them. I feel very fortunate I was able to see my suffering from a different lens, and also finally validate that it was caused by iatrogenesis from benzodiazepines. Whatever the cause may be for obsessive thinking, intrusive thinking, compulsions, etc.- I just have not seen conventional mental health treatment help very many people. I also do not see the purpose in allowing people to believe that they will be chronically afflicted with this condition. Thank you for your comments and for reading my blog!

    Warmly,
    Rose