Sunday, September 20, 2020

Comments by zoriolus

Showing 30 of 30 comments.

  • Thanks for the link.. Seiner refers to his brain zapping at McLean as “neurotherapuetics” which has a nice sound to it. Anyway, they do have a brisk “therapeutic” business going at McLean and if they indeed do 10,000 a year ( that’s 192 weekly), that would be an impressive assembly line. The required support to do 3o to 50 a day M through F is logistically difficult to manage. Would 5 or more rooms be running simultaneously, all with a device in question and anesthesia personal and equipment. Then there is recovery. From what I’ve read, this classification change proposal is considered by the FDA every 10 years or so. 2011 was the last attempt. I also wondered if ECT was reimbursable through private insurance and medicare and if there was any perceived or real threat that those funds would dry up due to many factors. I heard the term “guild interests” thanks to Mr. Whitaker and others and admit to questioning the motives of one or more guilds. It appears that a reclassification (of a device) would have some positive ripple effect in validating the psychiatrist, the methodology, the underlying thin science, the equipment, and the incurred charges billed.
    The FDA supposedly weighs the opinions and comments sent to them by the public and concerned interests. I guess the lawyers who represent the complainants are just one aspect of the process.
    I have questions, like you.

  • I’m trying to understand the layers of controversy. What significance is the classification of the device; whether it’s high risk level 3 or lower risk level 2. What would be the advantage to ECT defenders regarding clinical and business interests? I read that only 2 companies in the US make the machines and 1 of the companies is owned by psychiatrists. Would the reclassification of the device as level 2 allow the marketing of ECT as a “low risk” high benefit procedure? What would change? This dubious brain procedure is still available no matter. Would the designation change allow more brain zapping in less clinically restricted circumstances? Expansion of ECT “services” is not a good idea.

  • Her plan doesn’t sound too good to me. She repeats the word “more”. Whoever put this together for her seems to respect NAMI and the APA. Does she have any understanding about what’s going on?
    The Child Mind Institute is also a noted reference. Their mantra seems to be that ADHD is under treated.
    She needs to “evolve” on this one, and quick.

  • “How dangerous is anesthesia to children’s brains”?
    There are so many variables to be considered that it would be difficult to do a study.
    There are many different anesthetic drugs used for different purposes and in different combinations.
    There is the process of securing and maintaining a safe airway. The procedure, length of procedure, age, multiple anesthetics, and patient med profile would have to be factored in.
    It would be difficult to come up with any valid or reliable information.

  • The Pelletier case and other cases wouldn’t be possible without the dx of somatoform. It starts with the opinion and the mayhem flows from there. The false validity of the dx bleeds over to Social Services, Courts, and Schools.
    A proposed solution to Mass. DCF’s issues was to hire on a larger psychiatric professional staff as if this would solve the problem of the “parent-ectomy”.
    Social Services are valuable for all the reasons Dr. Hickey mentioned, but there must be a way to disconnect DCF and the courts in being complicit with this aggressive maneuver.
    Thanks again Dr. Hickey. This is important.

  • I read the Sunshine Coast Daily article about the Hornby twins and Health Officer Cleary’s analysis. Higher doses are better than low doses when prescribed by an “expert physician”. This issue isn’t as theoretical as I thought since the authorities in Tasmania are discussing the therapeutic range of Dexamphetamine. It seems like the only way to have a constant blood level would be a pump, a patch, or an IV and I wouldn’t be surprised if Barkley and Associates have that base covered.

  • I remember hearing the peculiar concept that amphetamines “calm down” the ADHD sufferer and work the “opposite” in the ADHD brain. I don’t remember where I learned this or the source but other people accepted this as common factual knowledge as well, and still do. I also heard the comparison of Ritalin and other psych drugs to insulin for diabetes. Marketing and propaganda seem to make this all possible.
    Would Russell Barkley be in favor of all unmedicated, but ADHD labeled drivers, having their DL’s taken away? Or, anyone with an ADHD designation, medicated or unmedicated, having their DL pulled because of unverifiable monitoring of their “amphetamine” impairment?

  • “Her older sisters muscle biopsy had also suggested mito, which can run in families”. Globe.
    The case could be made that Justina was spared a muscle biopsy. As Lou says, “It quacks like a duck” and responds to Korson’s medical management.
    That would be critical information for Dr. Newton to consider if she was interested. She wasn’t.
    I know parents who shop for psychologists, psychiatrists, and drugs for their kids. A dx is easy to come by.

  • Dr. Alice Newton sees Korson and Flores as “innocent victims” of the manipulative parents. She has no option but to present it that way or go head to head with the Tuft’s medical team. Lou is correct that there is an “agenda” and it’s somatoform. Korson’s medical diagnosis was a roadblock to a successful, Newton led “parent-ectomy”. I don’t believe Palmer deals with the 5 other cases in the last 18 mos. as reported by the Globe.

  • Alan Schwarz, of the NYT’s, deserves some credit for pointing out obvious conflicts of interest and business ties. Regarding Shire, he says “because the new condition shares so many symptoms with ADHD, these products might easily be repositioned to serve the new market”.
    There’s no “might” , maybe, or possibly about it. Schwarz, and most everyone else, knows the game plan. “Reposition” for S.C.T.D. Grab 5 million more who are slipping past the criteria of “hyperactive”.

  • What can we do? The Pelletier case illustrates how vigilant we must be to confidently raise our kids and calmly challenge the prevailing ADHD/ODD/Mood disorder culture. Make sure you have a sure footed pediatrician who has a healthy skepticism of child psychiatry. I have a network of friends and relatives who now look at the issue in a different way. Stay out of the swamp of left right politics and look at the huge area of common ground. Support and raise awareness of those trying to detox from psych drugs. I might be in favor of NIMH backing research in the detox process.

  • Concerning the real doctors at BCH or any hospital coming down on the Dept of Psychiatry: An example where real doctors along with hospital medical support personnel are actually complicit, would be ECT. Anesthiology has been employed for decades to assist the psychiatrist, who stands to the side and pushes his button. The pt. is then wheeled to recovery room. Although I doubt that ECT is part of BCH’s offered services, the point is that there are areas of cooperation and coexistence. There may be private grumblings among medical staff, but no one is going to challenge Alice Newton and her team of child protection experts. I reread the Globe 2 part series and it mentions that Child protection is now a “certified area”. As Lou points out, the Docs are employees of the hospital.
    Your comments made me wonder about intersecting areas and the MCA textbook.

  • I continue to look for value in psychiatry but the going is tough, and the more I look the less I find. I sense that Lou Pelletier is in a similar place as he describes the helplessness of falling in a rabbit hole. What defense is there when the judge can be bamboozled by the malleable criteria in the DSM and declare a clear winner? Dr. Hickey points out that Justina isn’t an isolated case and that is backed up by the Boston Globe. Few parents would challenge this system even if they could. I’d like to know if this judge ever ruled in favor the parents in a somatoform / medical child abuse case.

  • Does the “broader constitutional issues” include more than the gag order and false imprisonment?
    Lou Pelletier isn’t shy about challenging somatic sensory disorder or what ever the name is this week. The stream started at BCH, a center for somataform research, papers, and promotion. BCH has also refined the “parent-ectomy” process. It starts with the validity and authority of a pych dx and that’s what should be on trial, not Lou and Linda. BCH took a short cut to eliminate a competing dx in favor of their house specialty under the pretense of protecting vulnerable children.
    How did 14 months of intense and focused inpatient psychiatric treatment work out? Not to good.

  • This is a situation where there is common ground among those with different politics.
    Skepticism of psychiatry is universal.
    I believe that BCH took a deliberate shortcut to a spurious “somatoform” dx. by not talking to Korson and Flores.
    Lou and Linda aren’t perfect, but who is. Good people can act like jerks and that holds true for many on a hospital staff. This is the real world, buttons get pushed, and a dx/pill isn’t required.
    The parents can appeal in 3 months and maybe the DCF can loosen up their grip in the mean time.
    An investigation by an objective, outside, authority should begin. JCAHO should make themselves useful.

  • Dependent edema in a 15 year old is alarming and point to a number of medical issues just as the Pelletiers and Dr. Korson have claimed. I’m not sure what psych meds would specifically cause this but they surely wouldn’t help. According to Lou, Justina had some cardiac problems which included rapid heart rate.
    I agree that a thorough investigation is needed at BCH and DCF by neutral and objective persons, not the Mass. Dept. of Health. Maybe Robert Whitaker could get involved.
    The ultimate answer isn’t more medical and psychiatric personnel at DCF as the Globe alluded to. Psychiatry’s role in the foundation of any system should be suspect, especially with kids.
    I hope Justina is sent to Tufts today, and home tomorrow.

  • The combination of a benzo with a potent narcotic is the beginning of a good general anesthetic without the safety of a medical professional monitoring airway and oxygen. Many fatalities probably occur due to airway obstruction along with respiratory depression. They are “narcotized”.
    I believe that Valium was introduced as being safe with little or no dependence potential which encouraged family docs to write scripts. Panic disorder was the doorway to Xanax addiction for many. An old-time detox MD said that alcohol and benzos were the 2 most dangerous drugs to come off of.
    I knew a psychiatrist who would discharge benzo addicts on Klonopin claiming that it was unsafe for them to be totally removed from benzos. I believe he cited Mark Gold research.

  • Good question. Lou stated that BCH discontinued the vitamin cocktail, Lyrica, and metoprolol, but I have read nothing about what psych drugs were started. Justina’s chart (which probably weighs more than she does ) and supporting records hold the answers. I suppose that denying and delaying the family custody keeps those records hidden from the parents. I am curious to know what other DSM disorders they tagged her with and the medication management. Somatoform wouldn’t be the only opportunity in which to medicate and observe.

  • The link is at the bottom of my post and Dr. DeMaso is a source of information.
    The title is “Fact or Fiction: Somatoform Disorders Explored” from a BCH publication called Pediatric Views. This little article to the pediatric staff explains how to deal with parents who understand that their child has a medical problem and not a psychiatric one. There seems to be a carefully considered process to convert a medical diagnosis to a psychiatric one. Trusting parents are ambushed.
    I would hope that everyone wouldn’t need a medical attorney with them when they access healthcare? It’s hard not to be cynical. I read your link concerning the hospital kickbacks and I hope that you can recover from this.

  • It’s good to know that someone is digging into the claims of companies such as VeriPsych (great name) and challenging the science, data, and exposing conflicts of interest. A serologic test with 83% prediction accuracy for schizophrenia is surely an attention grabber even if it’s bogus. Which number fudging techniques, of the many available, did they use to achieve their desired outcome?
    Glad to have run into this website. Thanks

  • A few years ago I read about Rebecca Riley, the 4 year old who died due to a psych med balancing act promoted by Dr. Joseph Biederman. The Pelletier case reminded me of the arrogance of Dr. Joe in pushing a psych dx on children and the inevitable chemicals that follow.
    It does appear to be a “well oiled machine” as Dr. Hickey states. A 2006 BCH article, that credits Dr. DeMaso, gives insight on how to deal with the skeptical parents and hijack a customer.
    If Dr. Flores would have been brought in at admission, what would have happened? I would guess 1 to 2 weeks max medical inpatent getting Justina tuned up compared to the year long Bader 5 intensive experience. What if BCH would have just made the phone call to Korson? They chose not to. BCH did this because they had done it before. The parents were put in a box. Sign our treatment plan or else. Justina probably had research value.
    DCF and a duped judge certainly have responsibility, but it all started with the BCH psych dept.
    This is a big deal and needs to be exposed, again. Maybe Frontline could do another series on the authority of psychiatry related to parental custody. Can JCAHO get involved? Thanks.

    http://apps.childrenshospital.org/x-views/august06/somatoform_disorders.html