Thursday, March 23, 2017

Comments by Nornwen

Showing 2 of 2 comments.

  • It’s interesting because I self-identify as autistic and have never gotten an official diagnosis.

    I operate under the idea that autism is a normal/natural human difference. But I feel as soon as we label it a disorder and make someone authority on it we get off track…

    If you put the power into someone else’s hand’s like the autistic person, they can determine if its a valuable aspect of themselves or if they identify that way at all. I think self-identifying should also be seen as acceptable. Its not really about rejecting the label itself as much as seeing it as acceptable.

    Certainly diagnosis is valuable to help people operate a legal system, get services, etc.

    Have you heard of Autistic Self Advocacy Network? Or the term neurodiversity? I would be interested in your thoughts.

  • Really interesting, and definitely reminds me. I’ve been diagnosed as ADHD, been described as oppositional defiant, and self-identify as autistic.

    You seem to be operating under the idea that these labels lack usefulness and are meant to imply that something is wrong with somebody. I operate under a different idea, on where these labels can and should be reclaimed. They don’t have to be any more negative then “anti-authoritarian” even though they were initially meant to be so.

    Homosexuality once was on the DSM, for instance, but homosexuality is still real and many people today treat it as an acceptable difference. There are many other things that have been on the DSM that are like that.

    Certainly there is nothing unnatural about being oppisitional defiant, its just when we call it a disorder, that’s where human bias about inferiority and superiority comes in.

    For me, I do not reject these labels, I embrace them as natural parts of myself. I don’t accept typical treatment for them. Mostly I just focus on treating the stress that comes from being in a world of people who are much different then me and that lack acceptance.