Saturday, September 26, 2020

Comments by truthteller

Showing 4 of 4 comments.

  • Right to exist. People have this right to exist, not corporations with no merit changing the circumstance of “suffering” but naive or ill-informed people. This is what I mean…in the late nineties when anti-depressants were prescribed like gang busters, many people became bipolar in result of taking these medications. Parents and young adults were told that this manic reaction had nothing to do with the drug but the drug just coaxed out this “other” diseased self. So blame was shifted off the drug and the band marched on. A lot of these parents and young adults were referred to “bipolar experts” during this time, to reassure the parents and young adults that indeed the young adult now had this lifelong diagnosis, but it was okay, because everything about this diagnosis was above board and the parameters were confidently explained by these “experts”. Fast forward 15 years. I see the “expert” I talked to promoting “pediatric bipolar disorder” in a public space, to naive parents who have no idea of brain biology. He shows OCD studies as proof and hope that more and more is being found about the brain in studies. He is showing OCD studies as evidence and support for, justification for his proliferation of the bipolar diagnosis, in children. A disgusting and comic example of how my family had been duped those many years ago, and I marvel at the income this person must have made telling families like mine a lie.

  • In the Connecticut newspaper “The Advocate” dated Sunday, June 8, the article, “Schools Working to overhaul mental health program” is this quotation by a NAMI staff member advocating for more of a psychiatric presence for young people:

    a staff member of the Stamford/ Greenwich chapter of the National Alliance of the Mental Illness, suggested getting pediatricians more involved in mental health treatment. She wants pediatricians to have training in adolescent psychiatry and that, just like regular physical checkups, children be given mental health evaluations.

  • In the Connecticut newspaper “The Advocate” dated Sunday, June 8, the article, “Schools Working to overhaul mental health program” is this quotation by a NAMI staff member advocating for more of a psychiatric presence for young people:

    a staff member of the Stamford/ Greenwich chapter of the National Alliance of the Mental Illness, suggested getting pediatricians more involved in mental health treatment. She wants pediatricians to have training in adolescent psychiatry and that, just like regular physical checkups, children be given mental health evaluations.

    My thoughts: Upon reading this, I was not surprised. Early prevention of mental disorders being desired by everybody, I am not sure there is a better option than Psychiatrists. Then I thought of psychologists and social workers and how those fields perhaps would be less likely to give a child a life-long diagnosis and also unlikely to prescribe medication. If the hypothesis is correct that we do not know enough about the brain or the mind-altering medications for these medications to be used, then psychiatry has no place giving “evaluations” to children. I am in favor of psychologists, counselors and social workers, but psychiatrists and psychiatry and the risk of iatrogenic effects of their medications and permanent labels makes me think they should be evaluating themselves for quite a while. They should be their own client base. For a while. Maybe they’ll find that how they make people different is traumatizing and representative of their own obtuse banality. They can break the hearts of children and their parents by claiming to know something about the child that blindsides both the parents and the child by alienating the child in disease and disrupting the child/ parent bond using a flimsy biological hypothesis.