Friday, September 20, 2019

Comments by oice

Showing 7 of 7 comments.

  • Hi Jill,
    I love the focus on decision making and self-empowerment. Unfortunately I think psychology tends to sanctify suffering, as if it elevates us in some way. I believe suffering should be felt, honoured for what it has to contribute to our evolution, and then let go. I agree there are lots of reasons why people hold onto suffering, and I believe we become addicted to it. Many people don’t understand their role in their own suffering, that we in fact create much of it for a complex variety of reasons. Simply asking ourselves “do I want to suffer over this” is a powerful question, whether or not we are in the right or someone else has perpetrated some wrong against us. The focus should be on our quality of life and mental well-being above all else, regardless of whether we or other people think we “deserve” or “have the right” to suffer over something. If we were being tortured and had the power to ask the torturer to stop, would be stop them? We are often our own torturers and executioners, much more so than the other people or circumstances in our lives.

  • Hi Victor,
    Sorry, I put this reply in the wrong section previously.
    Thank God there are so many dissenters-to-the-norm out there! I quit my therapist training because I felt so lonely in a profession that seems bent on conforming a person’s “symptoms” to a model of dysfunction, rather than focusing on the inherent strengths and resilience of the human spirit. Use of the word “empirical” in psychology really bugs me. The only empiricism we are likely to find is direct feedback from clients about whether or not their therapy is helping. Like you I found it very difficult to have a conversation that inspired me or supported this way of thinking, and I began to feel incredibly isolated. The therapy community is very fragmented, and the last thing a therapist should be is professionally isolated, and alas I don’t see that changing soon. I hope you find your professional tribe and continue to find joy in your work. I think you’re onto something very important and probably much more useful to your clients than the more traditional approach.

  • Hi Victor,
    Thank God there are so many dissenters-to-the-norm out there! I quit my therapist training because I felt so lonely in a profession that seems bent on conforming a person’s “symptoms” to a model of dysfunction, rather than focusing on the inherent strengths and resilience of the human spirit. Use of the word “empirical” in psychology really bugs me. The only empiricism we are likely to find is direct feedback from clients about whether or not their therapy is helping. Like you I found it very difficult to have a conversation that inspired me or supported this way of thinking. The therapy community is very fragmented, and the last thing a therapist should be is professionally isolated, but alas I don’t see that changing soon. I hope you find your professional tribe and continue to find joy in your work. I think you’re onto something very important and probably much more useful to your clients than the traditional approach.

  • Hi WiseMonkey, I have to wonder if it’s not the very premise of therapy that is really flawed. Perhaps if our friendships and community could provide for more of our emotional and social needs, therapy would be less needed. I think our society is what is making us unwell. I wonder if most clients are looking for a relationship they cannot create or sustain in the real world, and thus most feel unsatisfied with the inherent falseness of the therapeutic relationship. I felt like a fraud personally, like I was selling something I had no intention or ability to provide.

  • Hi WiseMonkey, liked your post. It’s a sad indictment that the people with the most insight into therapy are often the people who leave the field. I also left the field three years ago for all the reasons cited by Daniel. It’s sad to leave something that you feel inspired to pursue, so I hope you find an avenue to express that part of yourself. I agree that “therapy” is probably the opposite of what most “therapists” actually do, but most therapists are just not aware enough to realise it. If somebody asked me today whether they should go into the field of psychology I would say a resounding “NO”.

  • Hi Daniel, I don’t know if you are still reading these comments, but here goes. I loved this piece. I have also watched all of your movies and felt very inspired. I get a sense from you of someone of great quality of mind and spirit and giftedness. The ironic thing is that the therapy world needs people like you, but often what we care most deeply about is also our greatest vulnerability. I too am an ex-therapist who quit for the exact same reasons you did, with great sadness. All of your ideas resonate deeply with me. I’m glad that you have found another avenue to make an impact, as I do believe the mental health system is deeply sick and flawed and perpetuates “mental illness”, and indeed profits from it. I will continue to look out for your work, and I’m glad your voice is out there. Bless you.