Thursday, May 26, 2022

Comments by rebel

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  • With all due respect, if people need to be freed as you claim they do; we must first respect and not intervene in someone else’s life path. Each person must come to his or her own conclusion, shall I say, actually on every little and big thing. Second, if, like you said, people need to be freed, they will need a viable alternative to the above. In my personal opinion, unless the alternative shows people the “wonder of life and SPIRIT,” it will never sell and all those things you list will continue to be the least objectionable alternative to most people. If people are slaves to whatever you claim they are slaves to, they are slaves because of what’s on the inside, rather than the outside. Most people are slaves to themselves, if you choose to use those words. Most people are imprisoned not because of what’s out there, but what’s in there (as in their hearts, their spirits, souls, minds and bodies.) If people want to be freed, they must look within first and make that decision themselves. No one on this Earth can make that decision for them. Thank you.

  • Joshua, I am sorry what you have written is so sad and so very and tragically wrong. As a child of middle-class parents, I am thankful to have been born and I am thankful for my parents. This is very important as I am the daughter of Vietnam Veteran. I know that they had both my sister and Ioutt of love. Love is the answer because it is rooted in Spirit. And yes, Diaphanous Weeping, no one can make another person forgive or do anything. However, in my opinion, forgiveness is the only true way to healing. But then no one can heal unless they truly want to heal. Thank you.

  • Although, I have been hurt and harmed by the psychiatric system, I would be extremely hesitant to compare it to slavery. People can and still do make choices whether to enter the system or not. Basically, with all due respect, I am completely uncomfortable with what you say in regard to this system. Like I said, I agree that it has harmed and hurt way too many people. I, too, have been harmed and hurt by this system. However, in my personal opinion, what you say in your posts is like adding insult to injury. I strongly believe that the absolute only way to free oneself of such a system is through forgiveness. Not only must we forgive those who we feel harmed us, but ourselves, also. I do realize that most of us have been harmed by those too difficult to forgive, whether in the psychiatric system or not. But, if we do not forgive the psychiatric systems or ourselves for getting involved in it, we will never be free. All of this is a learning experience for SPIRIT as we progress along the path of life. Thank you.

  • Please forgive me, but MIA bears no relation to slaveowners. It is imperfect, yes, as we are imperfect. I am sorry but debating anything is no illusion. And I know an illusion when I see one. Like I have said earlier, if we cannot debate any type of anti-psychiatry stance, then as they say, “we have no leg to stand on.” We must be willing to debate, and we must be willing to forgive those we believe have harmed us and ourselves, too. Otherwise, shallow thinking prevails, and we become the “laughingstock” of the world. We also need to stop making parents scapegoats for the problems of the world. I appreciate the work of MIA and Robert Whittaker. Thank you.

  • I understand why you say what you say, but I definitely disagree. In my personal opinion, I do not necessarily agree that there should be “an active component” to MIA. I think MIA should be a teaching and clearinghouse website. It has helped many as they have tried to free themselves from psychiatry and its drugs. It has been a forum for those who are pro-psychiatry and anti-psychiatry. And this is very good. Whatever side one is on; if one cannot defend and debate it, then it must be reconsidered as to why you think/believe the way you do. I also do not think that MIA should be the catalyst for radicalism against these “establishments.” I, personally, would not feel comfortable standing outside social service offices with leaflets and the like. These kinds of actions sound good on the face; but can backfire in so many different ways. Also, in polite disagreement, I do definitely consider “autism/Asperger’s syndrome” as valid diagnoses. Many parents are dealing with their children who have these issues, and we need to respect their challenges. Finally, I am indebted to Robert Whittaker for the work he has done and providing this site with interesting and as forum in which we can voice our comments. This truly helps all of us heal. Thank you.

  • Actually, I don’t mean to burst your bubble, but as far as an “athletic deviancy disorder” can be sold to the public, there are those who will try such nonsense. Oh, as an aside. because I have a “spelling disorder” when I went to use spell-check, I got “deviancy.” Perhaps, that says something about a society that seems to value athletics above other talents and skills. The real tragic part is that someone who has trouble in athletics, their real issues will be hiding behind a bogus disorder and bogus, maybe harmful treatments. Additionally, the person’s real strengths and gifts will be swallowed up by what he or she can’t do, rather than what he or she can do. In the end, both society and this individual suffer. Thank you.

  • I think what you say about athletics is very interesting. Athletics is big business, especially in the United States. Athletics actually pays for much of the other programs in many colleges and universities. This was born out when some colleges and universities began dropping some programs during the pandemic because all regular athletic games in sports such as basketball and football were either cancelled or played to a no audience stadium. The other point is how many parents become upset when they learn that their son or daughter is not athletic and that athletic scholarship to a big-name university is not forthcoming. And, yes, having problems with athletics might signal other issues that need to be addressed. Still, what concerns me is that our obsession with athletic prowess is so great that people who are “athletically challenged” basically “fall into the cracks.” I would not put it past any psychiatrically motivated professional to add some kind of “athletic disorder” as an alleged Bonafide disorder for treatment and drugging, etc. But you can’t drug someone into throwing a football or throwing a basketball into the hoop. How many times have you thrown a piece of wadded up paper into a nearby trash basket and missed? Well, many of us could retire for a thousand years if we were paid for those misses? Thank you.

  • What you say is interesting and I have given this much thought even before this. In my opinion, it seems things about us can be changed and some things can’t be change. And I would say that trying to change those things that can’t be changed is one of the reasons for the great stress and distress that many go through in life and in fact can lead to great trauma. Also, in my opinion, that one of the purposes of the psychiatric drugs was to change the personality of the patient. In fact, I saw a blurb in a magazine back at the time that “Prozac” came out and the blurb said, “pills for personality.” I guess I saw that as important to me as it still sticks in my mind. I also think of the old book and movie, “Flowers for Algernon” where the main character was given drugs that made him “smarter.” But, in the end, the drugs failed miserably, and the main character basically went back to who he was. In my personal experience, the psych drugs did something similar to me. After all those years being drugged and then going through the years of withdrawal, I have basically returned to whom I was meant to be. Maybe some of these drills you mention can change some things about a person, but I must confess I am skeptical. Still, I am beyond thinking of this as a nature/nurture issue; although no one can be who he or she is without input from the “wiring” of the brain. In a manner of speaking, I think of each one of us is being “wired” within like a radio or something similarly electrical. And we do each of us operate on both unique and shared frequencies. When these frequencies clash, that’s when can experience relationship issues. I, personally, don’t think these “frequencies” can be changed without great agony such as what the psych drugs and ECT does. They may be modified or adapted somewhat to suit the environment. But we really need to be careful with what we do to our brains, even when our brains and sometimes our bodies seem to “fail” us. Thank you.

  • The best way to break free of the mental health system is to just ignore it. Otherwise, as my father would tell me, “You stoop to their level.” And when you do “stoop to their level” you assist in legitimizing it. What we can do is forgive those who have hurt us. Or we will never grow and they, even if, we are not “patients” in their system let them win. We need to stop letting the mental health system live in our heads, “rent free.” Forgiveness frees us, anger keeps us “in chains.” Thank you.

  • I remember being introduced to Toffler years ago. I don’t remember the word, “prosumer.” I am all for made up words that come from the imagination and creativity of an individuals or even a free-thinking group of individuals; but the word “prosumer” seems artificial, contrived—not like it come the heart of the imagination, but a worn-out, tired brain who may have been at the mall and wished he might have been in a group of happy shoppers at Christmastime. I am sorry, Mr. Toffler. I think he was an intelligent person, but the word “prosumer” was not his best idea. We all make mistakes. Perhaps, we should remember him for his successes and throw the word, “prosumer” where it belongs in the trash can of useless words that need to be extinct—because deep down inside we really do love our native language, English. “Prosumer”…I am laughing all the way to English class…. Thank you.

  • First, I again, was just thinking of this study and how cruel it is to rear twins or any siblings apart. Even if the parenting of the children was untenable and the children needed to be in foster care or adopted, siblings, including twins should not be reared apart and to do it for “scientific” reasons is just child abuse. Second, all these so-called studies are destined for failure because they concentrate on the “appearances” whether than what’s inside a person. But then we do seem to have the fault of only viewing what we see or think we see, rather than what is true. When we finally begin to see what the appearances of people, events and everything in this world, we will have made progress. Thank you.

  • This study definitely had its share of flaws which makes it an essentially useless study. However, we can easily bring attention to these useless studies by also making arguments that completely miss the point. In my opinion, it seems that no matter the study our natural emotionalism seems to get in the way, and we miss the light. Until we see the light and consider SPIRIT which also includes mind, brain, and body, all “studies” will be useless whether the flaws of the study or of society are illuminated or not. It is also time that in addition to the SPIRIT, we must acknowledge the natural frailty of all humans and the unique individuality of each human. Perhaps, we need to spend less time on study experimentation and its flaws and take the time to learn about each person on an individual basis. Thank you.

  • And, I say it again; an “itch” is NOT subjective; unless it is used colloquially, such as the proverbial “seven-year itch” or I have an “itch” to do something such as a desire to go visit the Grand Canyon or whatever. An “itch” is real; but then, so is the imagination. One’s imagination (at least for those so pre-disposed is a real as reality-perhaps more real.) The actual problem is that we have some who do not take the imagination seriously or those who have the gift of an imagination seriously. Yes, some are psychiatrists and diagnose people incorrectly based on their imaginations; but they are not necessarily psychiatrists who “diagnose.” Many are just “regular people” who don’t understand and thus judge, criticize and bully. And some do seem to get on that “bandwagon” with the psychiatrists. However, the ITCH is REAL; the IMAGINATION is REAL. Sadly, it only becomes subjective if there might be some type of judgement involved. I doubt this is happening on this site by anyone. But I just wanted to clarify about both itches and the imagination. Thank you.

  • I politely disagree with both Bradford and registerforthissite. I do not think that hallucinations and schizophrenia are subjective as Bradford states. At the very least, psychiatric drugs can cause these to occur and that is not subjective. It is real. Additionally, other drugs and toxic substances can cause this. There may be other causes too, so I do to think they are necessarily subjective. Like all alleged diagnoses of mental illnesses diagnoses, whether or not schizophrenia can and should be debated. I am wondering if many times when a person is diagnosed with schizophrenia, they may actually have another condition which is not addressed. I would be unable to say if every person diagnosed with schizophrenia would fall into this group.
    As far as “faking itching.” As someone who has numerous allergies that cause me to itch, you cannot fake itching. Now, sometimes itching can be caused by a stressful situation. Sometimes, drugs and other toxins can cause itching. when I was taking the prescribed psychiatric drugs, I had itching both inside my body and brain and on the skin of my body. My brain also felt raw inside. Now, I am aware that according to those who study the brain, one cannot experience “actual feelings” in the brain. However, I checked with others who were taking similar drugs and they experience similar things. I consider all this as real as the sun that shines every day. Now when I did stop the psychiatric drugs, the raw feeling inside my brain and the itching inside my brain and body stopped. However, since I am prone to other allergic reactions to other things, that type of itching can continue if in contact with something that provokes an allergic reaction and thus has never stopped. And it is not ever faked! Thank you.

  • No matter what alleged “study” they attempt to do or maybe concoct on “benzo withdrawal” these so-called researchers conveniently forget that most “patients” are prescribed more than just the “benzos.” Usually, the “patient” is also receiving an anti-depressant, even a neuroleptic, or perhaps a drug like lithium, also. Two of the psychiatrists I had prescribed me “benzos” first klonopin and then a new psychiatrist abruptly changed it to Xanax because in their opinion “benzos” would counter the side effects of the “neuroleptics” of which I was first prescribed Risperdal, then switched to abilify and when I had the side effect from ability of being unable to swallow, I was switched back to Risperdal. One more point is that during this time I was prescribed other drugs while taking the drugs I just listed, but I have little to no memory of each and every drug prescribed me. I know this is a long way around to get to the point that the people who constructed this study seem to have no realization of what’s actually going on in the “psych drug world.” Thank you

  • I may have disagreed with you at times, but I have hope for you no matter how you described yourself. If saying you have schizophrenia works for you, whom I am to sy? I can not. It is not for me to live your life, your life path or live your life purpose. It is more than enough for me to live my life, my life path, my life purpose. So who am I to judge. The Good Book says, “Judge not lest ye be judged.” I believe most other religious and spiritual traditions have similar advice. I may disagree with you at times, but you must be you. No one can deny you that right. So, since it appears you are very resolute in being you and no one else; I have hope for you. It was the great poet e. e. cummings who said it (I’m paraphrasing.) the greatest battle in life is to be yourself and no one else. Keep up the good fight. Thank you.

  • We have to thank Robert Whittaker for his article. It is as usual, excellent. But perhaps, Thomas Insel doesn’t deserve such attention. I haven’t check Amazon to see if anyone is reading his book. I am thankful to Robert Whittaker because he hase helped to free so many from psychiatry. I am thankful, especially for his book, “Anatomy of an Epidemic” which virtually fell of the library shelf and into my hands just as I was realizing something was wrong with me and it was not the alleged mental illness, but the psychiatric drugs they had been prescribing me that I dutifully and obediently took; that actually made me sick. But now today, I also realize that if I want to live free and live happy that I must forgive and forget how psychiatry treated me. There is much more to my life story and psychiatry seemed to not want to see that— for a lot of reasons. I have learned, maybe through trial and error that it is much better to light a candle in the darkness than rage until the darkness consumes you. Thank you.

  • Psychiatry is its own religion. It is completely unrelated to any other religion. It has created its own rituals and sacraments. It may have borrowed from other religions here and there. Some have borrowed from Buddhism and tried to manipulate Buddhist principles for alleged therapeutic reasons, but psychiatry is still its own religion. There is no other religion like it on Earth for it denigrates other religions and hides so many truths and facts from people, they suffer. Psychiatry is its own religion. Thank you.

  • Amazing! That a study would actually be published in such a “mainstream magazine” as “Consumer Reports” questioning the effectiveness of the “gold standard” of psychiatric treatment. This is especially so as each and every day they step up the noise on the news and other media to promote “mental health/illness” or basically to entice “us” or those we love into the psychiatric office, probably to be compelled to take these drugs. Thank you.

  • Honestly, I do not see how you can tell the difference between withdrawal and relapse. It would seem a very subjective thing. If someone is enlightened, they might consider that it is withdrawal. If one does not think outside most current psychiatric thinking, then it would be considered a relapse. After my experiences, taking these drugs, I would try to tell people, just like they tell people about starting the “illegal drugs.”–“Just don’t’ start them.” Perhaps, many of these diagnoses might be debated. And there is the ongoing debate as to “medicalizing the normal human condition.” In my mind, there is very little debate about using these drugs as any kind of “treatment.” In most cases, “treatment” should not harm the person more than the distress or illness that causes it. Sadness is a common human condition. Sadness can give us important information we need to know about our lives and the condition our lives at any particular time. However, these anti-depressants basically “short-circuit” any important information we need to know about ourselves. and as been pointed out in other articles on this site; the emotions are blunted. In essence, the emotions get so blunted, that one is basically “sleep-walking” through life. This is especially, so, when you add other psychiatric drugs; which usually happens; as these drugs can cause the very “psychiatric symptoms” they claim are the “disease.” Our bodies and our brain constantly give us signals we need to know. When we learn these signals; which are highly individual; we can, as they say, “live our best life” which is uniquely tailored to each person. But the drugs take all that away. So, really one should ask why consider even starting an anti-depressant. Then one does not have to worry whether it is “withdrawal” or “relapse.” However, I could almost “bet the farm” that the symptoms one experience when stopping an anti-depressant are very probably not “relapse” but most assuredly “withdrawal.” Thank you.

  • I understand why some people want to criticize alleged white male authoritarianism and implicate it in the evils of psychiatry. And like I said earlier, there have been many white males who have definitely contributed to the evils of psychiatry. However, I am completely reticent (I hope that is the right word) to implicate any particular group of people in a negative manner. Yes, the European/American culture has been basically patriarchal. And there are implications to that and like all things both negative and positive. However, I do find that implicating an entire group in a negative light, such as white males, really does nothing to solve the problem of psychiatry or any of the current problems we face in society. In my opinion, the best way to solve the problem is to consider each person as an individual and see what they can offer, rather than disparaging any particular group. In my opinion, on the whole all groups do share guilt and responsibility and are also innocent and victims. Life and living are inherently paradoxical. This is one truth psychiatry seems to avoid, as they say, “like the plague.” Thank you.

  • Thank you, Mr. Whittaker. The article is very enlightening, as usual. I actually trust no one with credentials from either the NIH or NIMH. It’s sort of like the old phrase, ” I’m from the government and I’m here to help.” Sadly, in many cases, if you do get help, it’s the wrong help and in the end can hurt or harm. But isn’t that psychiatry in a nutshell. I don’t know about abolishing or reforming. I think many people just want to live; just want their lives back. Right now, with their emphasis on drugs and even their therapies at present, people don’t get their lives back. The drugs and even the therapies cause the body and brain to be in a zombie-like, sleep-walking state. So, any real problems or issues or hidden from the patient and of course, the psychiatrist and therapist, but they are uninterested anyway. Drugs and therapies are the easy way out, especially for the psychiatrist. Prescribe a drug, send the patient to therapy and the psychiatrist think he or she has the work, without doing any work at all. And who suffers, the patient and eventually society. I am not sure if we can abolish or reform psychiatry. I am not sure what to do with it. It is like that one child who refuses to learn to listen to him or herself and thus tries to obtain their cues from the outside world. These cues thus become unpredictable and untrustworthy, because the child never learns to look within. I imagine in the end, only SPIRIT can solve this problem. It is probably too large for us mere mortal humans. Thank you.

  • Yes, you are right to a certain extent. I say that because, believe it or not in some areas of the South, a man may not necessarily get a diagnosis of something like “hypersexuality” for “sleeping around” as they say. He may just be called an “alcoholic.” If he doesn’t drink, he is called a “dry alcoholic.” And behind his back, he is described as someone who won’t keep his “you know what” in his pants. He is looked down upon, too and is probably not trusted. But I will say in many ways you are right. In my opinion, it is a complicated subject, and it has been definitely complicated over the last decades as women began entering the work force. I think that perhaps many thought the pandemic might compel women to return the traditional way; like an old 1950s sitcom. However, many women were so stressed with handling their children’s learning, the housework and also holding down their jobs virtually, they were more than happy the way things were just before the pandemic, not trying to adapt 1950s morays to 21st century technology. I just think that even this men/women thing can be successfully questioned. Despite what seems there is a lot of nuances involved and we should be willing to engage our minds to see that. Although in many ways you are correct, we must still be opened to the uniqueness of each person and situation. There a re millions and millions of little subcultures with all kinds of various morays. And yes, even those subcultures are still heavily influenced by whatever the prevailing or conquering culture at the time is. Thank you.

  • Many times, that white women are more likely to receive diagnoses of depression and are thus prescribed antidepressants is because of all the “groups” of people, white women have usually felt more comfortable receiving psychiatric therapy. Additionally, white women are much of the time, prescribed antidepressants for many “change of life episodes” from post-partum depression to menopause. In many ways, this is just a tragic artifact of the system. In my opinion, it has nothing to do with alleged white male authoritarianism or whatever. Many of the prescribers of these drugs are actually women themselves. We do ourselves a disservice by singling out specific groups as the “bad guys” behind psychiatry. Yes, most of the earliest psychiatrists, etc. were white men, but we are behind that now. Maybe, it’s me, but I’ve had much more grief from women than men. We need to look at the whole situation. We need to look at the psychiatric community, the Big Pharma community, and the “patients and family” too. Personally, I don’t think these drugs do any good. I think they, in most cases, do more harm than good. In addition to the side effects and the withdrawal from the drugs, these drugs, like all psychiatric drugs and even therapy, etc. hide much of what really needs to be addressed by the patient. As I have said earlier, it is the easy way out. And sadly, so many are so desperate because they have been brainwashed by media and others, they will take any way they can to get out of their misery, even if in the end it causes more misery. Thank you.

  • The “No Child Left Behind” Act failed. It was nothing but needless and overdone testing which wore out students, teachers, and staff. How can this “mental health nonsense” be any different? None of this addresses anything about helping people. Both increase the prospect of bullying and other such mean-spirited behavior. If we want to help people, we need to recognize differences as not faults or failures but as that which is good, right and necessary for the community. This should begin at birth, if not before and continue until death, if not past death. The answer lies not diagnostic labels that don’t work such as labels for “mental illness” which are “made up” in the worst sense and always hide what needs to be addressed in each person. Labels of diagnoses of “mental illness” are the lazy person’s way to deal with many things that need adaptation, understanding, kindness, dignity, and respect. My mother always said you get more flies with honey than with vinegar. So, why do we continue with the vinegar of mental illness diagnoses and totally ignore the honey of understanding, etc. which can help people and improve so many people’s lives? Why do we continue to bully people into submission? Thank you.

  • My “way of being” is correct for me. It is not meant to be correct for anyone else or someone is trying to live my life or be on my life journey or path. This is just as if I tried to consider someone else’s “way of being” as my “way of being” which would be very incorrect for me, because I would be trying to live a life or life path or journey that is not mine. This may be one of the most dangerous things in life one can do. It is that, in my opinion, which cause so much illness and strife, etc. in the world. In fact, in my opinion, it could be one of the causes of “premature death.” I think, when people try to do this, it causes them to fall into the hands of psychiatrists and believe things about themselves that aren’t true and disregard the things that are true; this is both the “negative and the positive” of each person because the “negative is wrapped in the positive” and the “positive is wrapped in the negative.” I should say I know this; because way too many times I have tried to live someone else’s “way of being” or attempted to conform to another’s “way of being” which is something that God did not mean for me to do. It has caused me much grief and distress and yes, led me into the clutches of the psychiatrists. And this caused me to miss the real truth about myself, that if I had known would have caused me much less grief and distress. However, some of what I do know about myself is information that was probably not available when I did fall into the clutches of the psychiatrists, etc. So, what do I wish for everyone; “Be Happy and Joyful in your Way of Being”- no matter what- the “positive and the negative of it” because it is correct and right for you and you, alone. Thank you.

  • With all due respect to what you say, and I mostly and very politely disagree. I, personally, think the words, “healing, healer, and recovery” are excellent words. However, sometimes they can get used in the worst way and by many who really don’t understand these three words; they are over-used. I, personally, look at “healing and recovery” in this way. I consider myself in both “healing and recovery” from the psych drugs and therapies, etc. And I am following my own personal path in “healing and recovery.” I am learning more about myself than any psychiatrist and their enablers, the LSCW therapists could tell me. In my opinion, this drugging and therapizing they do blunt everything and hide the real truth about the patient. All of this is either a misdiagnosis or an unneeded diagnosis due to the laziness, etc. of the psychiatrists, etc. And, sadly, so many suffer–so yes, we do need “healing and recovery” from such “mistreatment.” And
    the word, “mistreatment” may be a big understatement for many, too. Thank you.

  • “Blunting the emotions”, just maybe if that’s all they did—for a very short amount of time… But, as they say, that is just the tip of the iceberg and as far as SSRIs and other psychiatric drugs, it is the “Titanic.” The really tragic part is that the “blunting of the emotions” and other side effects of SSRIs and other psychiatric drugs usually hide underlying issues that need to be addressed and when addressed could very well improve the quality of life of the individual and without any damaging, dangerous chemicals and other such nonsense. Thank you.

  • Actually, I somewhat disagree on one point. There are sides in the spiritual world; good versus evil. This seems very simplistic, and it is possibly more complex. However, there seems to be possibly “good entities” in battle against “evil entities” every day. I think there may be a barrier against the “evil entities” but when they “sneak through” there is some sort of danger afoot. In my opinion, it is a constant battle that will eventually be win. But I am a mere human and don’t know when. Thank you.

  • I only agree with what you say partially. Yes, we do have a society that seems to divide people between the “healthy” and “unhealthy.” It is very arbitrary. But those making this alleged division are not “healers” or “priests.” at all; although as with everything there is usually some sort of religious component or you could not get people to go along with the ideas, however stupid. No, these people are just “snake oil salesmen/women types. If they have a religion; it is “scientism.” And, it is all False, Fake, etc. I read your questioning of the word, “empath.” I understand why you reference that. However, in my opinion, the only reason this word might get a bad reputation is that it is used by mass media; usually in an exploitive, aggrandizing way and that is the way of the mass media; at least in this century. “Healer” and “Empath” are not bad words. They have just been used in a negative light more to hurt and harm; rather than help and assist. So, it is completely understandable how these words can be viewed in the way that you express. I would warn anyone to always take what you hear through any form of mass media with a grain of salt; as they say. It is imperative that each one of us find ways to receive information that we can trust. However, because each one of us is very unique with unique brains, etc. that way can only be determined by each person. Thank you.

  • I am not against the term “healer” or those who are truly gifted in being “healers” or “healing” Unfortunately, people with such worthy gifts will leave the “health care system.” And if they have stumbled into psychiatry, it doesn’t take them long to wise up. If they stay, those natural God-given gifts of “healing” get tragically abused and they are no longer doing the will of God, but “dancing with the devil.” I do appreciate the quote at the end of the piece about the first book, where the “healer” mantra is mentioned. The author states, “The drugs often create mental illness, instead of curing it.” However, I do disagree somewhat. The drugs DO create mental illness. I would say that without the drugs, we would have little to no mental illness amongst the populations. It is not brain chemistry, genetics, pollution, or even modern urban life that create “mental illnesses.” It is the drugs. However, we have yet to be able to access how many and what all the drugs are that create mental illness. We know that the psychiatric drugs do; but we have not been able assess non-psychiatric drugs and their contribution nor even those things that may not be considered drugs at all, but in reality, they are “drugs.” Thank you.

  • One of the strangest comments I have heard, especially from psychiatrists, but now increasingly from “traditional doctors” is about the drugs/medications they prescribe: “We don’t know how it works, but it works.” In my opinion, this is usually “code” for “we’re giving you a drug for a non-existent illness, and it assuages our guilt and pacifies you,” and, if you do take this “drug” it may not work or even “damage” you somewhat and that lets them “off the hook.” Or in the case of traditional doctors, they feel that they don’t know what else to do. Sadly, they have shut off their intuition and imagination and all they see as the answers to “your problems/issues. etc.” is drugs, drugs, more drugs, and tests, and more tests and maybe a procedure or two or worse. So, does the patient get any better? Usually, no, they just get more frustrated and even more resigned to their “pain.” And, sometimes, they even lose their will to fight. Therefore, in many cases, they just get worse and so much of the time, it is the “patient” that gets the blame. Thank you.

  • I am concerned that everything everyone said might only get worse. I saw on the news that Congress was discussing financial appropriations for “mental health services.” They claim that after the pandemic, it is sorely needed and people, especially young people are suffering from all kinds of “ills” like anxiety and depression due to the pandemic. I know this article discusses basically older people because it deals with dementia and psychiatric drugs, etc. But of course, these “advocates/activists” forget, young people don’t stay young forever. If all these psych drugs, therapies, etc. don’t kill them, they will eventually age and then be affected by the “iatrogenic harm” and dementia and the etc. Right now, many of us do have at least some of the etc. However, as my father would say, “Their minds are made-up, don’t confuse them with the facts.” Back in the day, my father had a sign on his desk about this. It is truer now more than ever, especially about psychiatry, etc. and its implications and ramifications. Thank you.

  • I have been thinking about this “grief pill.” If they really want to make such dangerous garbage, then they can also take care of all the legal, financial things one must do after the passing of a loved one. And they can also clean out the closet and other things of the loved one who just passed and try to determine the best way to “dispose” of the items in accordance with the “wishes” of the loved one. They can come to the place where the funeral or memorial service is being held and hold the hands of the grieving. They can make sure the appropriate food for the family is available and the family in their grieving does not go hungry. They can make sure certain “death” practices as determined by the culture and religion of the family are upheld. It is quite obvious that those who have this so-called “grief pill” have no idea what the passing of a loved one entails; in fact, may have never truly experienced the death of a loved one or the death of anyone. It reminds me of my father, along with a group of Vietnam Veteran Army Chaplains were in a Sociology class taught by a young professor’s assistant. He tried to teach death from a textbook perspective. Of course, these Chaplains who had served in Vietnam, in the trenches weren’t having any of it. As the story goes, these Chaplains, one by one enlightened this young professor’s assistant with their experiences with not only the dying in Vietnam, but also delivering death notices to the surviving families stateside. His eyes were opened. I do not think our eyes are closed to the absolute ideocracy and lunacy of this idea. I am afraid those who thought of this have no idea of what they are doing. For, in their idea to create a “grieving pill” they not only devalue death and dying; they devalue life and living. It is just another way to make us into “robots.” Thank you.

  • I like many of your ideas, however, there is only one little fly in the ointment as they say in “pursuing the goal of making everyone good or ‘healthy.'” And that is the concept of “free will.” This means although noble to purse the goal of making everyone good or healthy; it is still a person’s choice as to whether he or she wants to be good or healthy. Some people do choose evil over good when given the choice (i.e., psychopaths etc.) Also, when given the choice to be healthy or unhealthy, some people do choose the “unhealthy” option. For some, the “unhealthy option” reaps a lot of “rewards.” And there are those who choose this option because they are choosing to basically “give up” and no longer “fight” for their lives. Psychiatry enables this in so many ways by basically creating real life “zombies” through their drugging and therapies, etc. But there re those who would never be involved in psychiatry who sadly choose this option. I, also, think there are many in this world who are terrified of “SPIRIT.” I consider this to be the result of systematic brainwashing. I know there are those who are fielding discussions on systematic racism/sexism, etc. However, no one wants to discuss, perhaps the underlying and pervasive problem of “systematic SPIRIT-BASHING” Many times, this even happens from those who we would think should know otherwise, like some religious clergy. Well, anyway, that is my opinion on this Good Friday. Thank you.

  • I always appreciate what you have to say on this matter, and I am glad you are expressing a very cogent viewpoint. In my opinion, the fact that it (the mind/brain dualism) is a problem reflects more on them (the psychiatrists) than on us or anyone else. How can I put it, if anyone has a brain, then it won’t be a problem? Huh? The mind is there. The brain is there. They work in synchrony. Those who consider this a problem just shows how they do not want them to work in synchrony and do want anyone to heal or make their lives better. I don’t have anything else to say. Thank you.

  • I, too, felt “violated” by most of my therapists. Actually, when I look back, they said things that were “crazier” than anything that I said; yet I was the “sick one” receiving the “diagnosis.” But that “violation” thing gets to me sometimes, even today. It is really a “rape of the mind” or “mind/brain” when you add in the psychiatric drugs and that the therapists are basically enablers of the psych drug system. I have written about this before. But, once in a whimsy of thinking, I noticed that the word; “therapist” can be divided into the words, “the-rapist.” As many claim, there are no coincidences. Thank you.

  • Actually, I didn’t know it (the mind/brain) was a problem. The Mind is from Spirit. The Brain is the physical manifestation of the Mind. Yes, the Brain can be damaged from physical causes or from causes like psychiatric drugs, etc. And the Brain can be damaged prior to birth causing many disabling issues. I think if it’s problem, it’s all in the mind/brains of these psychiatrists, etc. There is no problem if one sincerely wants to help others. The fact that it is a problem for these psychiatrists and others only reflects how they sadly devalue their “patients” and their issues, which maybe where it all starts and continues to this very day. Thank you.

  • Actually, psychiatrists know less about the brain than even traditional doctors do; however, which in most cases could be considered nil to nothing. Ironically and tragically, psychiatrists have achieved the title of “shrink” in slang terms. I think of “shrink-wrapped” like they do some food and packages. But in reality, the psych drugs they prescribe, profit from and promote assisted by “psychotherapists” and the therapizing they do; actually, shrinks the brain and damages it—usually for life; whether you continue on the drugs or withdraw from them in some manner. I have never seen a more apt slang word for a group of people than “shrinks” for “psychiatrists.” It’s a shame. I do not like to use slang words for any one or any particular group of people as they are usually very wrong, do not consider the individual, prejudicial, etc. But in the case of psychiatrists and the word “shrinks.” it is not so. In fact, it is the largest case of “self-fulfilling prophecy” ever noted in the history of the planet. Thank you.

  • Grief is a highly individual thing. It varies with each individual. It varies with each death the person experiences in a lifetime. Grief also encompasses more than just the loss of loved one. It can also include the loss of a “pet”, the loss of a job, divorce, even a move or other transition of life such as graduation, the birth of a child, marriage, etc. Grief is an important part of life. It is in its tragedy, a seemingly bittersweet experience. It actually unites us, although expressed uniquely by each person, in that it is a “leveling plane.” One cannot get through life and grow without grieving. There is not a pill on the face of the earth that can take away the responsibility of grieving. Each person must go through it—usually many times over. We cannot bypass it, jump over it, fly over it, etc. We must live through it. And for some kinds of grief, like the loss of a loved one; such as a child, spouse, parent, or sibling; it can take a lifetime and is only resolved when reunited after death in a place such as heaven. To steal grief from us is just bullying in the very worst sense. It is a form of terrorism on a grand scale. It means taking away the very thing which makes us human and connects us to our divine nature. “Non-human animals” grieve too. Are we to drug them also? One can not stop the process of grieving. I wish it were so, but if it were, it would stop us from living. We would not only be grieving those we had lost; but we would technically be dead ourselves. Oh yes, we would be talking, walking, breathing, etc. on the outside. But on the inside, we would be dead. All of us shells of we were, are or could be. If we take pills for grieving, as the article suggests, then you might as well kiss the planet goodbye and all those wonderful achievements of civilization and the beauties of nature, kiss them goodbye too. It is unthinkable. Grieving is nature’s way to remind us that we are still alive and still live; despite the pain we are enduring at the time. This may be the worst thing to happen to humanity, since … Thank you.

  • The problem with the whole notion expressed in this article is that “rights” do not come from other humans or organizations of humans, whether governmental or quasi-governmental entities, such as the UN or a defined governmental territory, such as a nation, etc. “Rights” come from God, or one could use terms like “Spirit”, “Higher Power,” etc. depending on one’s belief system. However, Thomas Jefferson in the Declaration of Independence noted well that only God bestows “rights.” Although this was partly in response to the tyrannical king of England at the time, it still rings true today. We need to realize that we are only mere Humans and that it is not up to us to determine who gets rights and who does not. That belongs to God/Spirit in which all deserve “rights.” Of course, this line of thinking would probably put many out of business, such as psychiatry and the like. Thank you.

  • Again, Bradford you are right. The DSM is not constructed for any alleged patient. It is a “bible” for the insurance business, who decide totally by “numbers” not by how it affects anyone. In all due respect to those, who have the desire to “reimagine mental illness, etc.” “Reimagine” seems like a loft goal, but, in my opinion, one can’t “reimagine” anything, much less psychiatry, mental illness, etc. “Imagination” is primordial and yes, it comes from God as a gift. I have learned over the years that it has been my imagination that has both saved me and harmed me. The harming part came from my association with psychiatry, its drugs, therapies, etc. that attempted to consider my natural imagination gift as some sort of disease, illness, “a severe and pervasive mental disorder.” Yet, amongst other things, when the drugs, etc. almost took my life (not by suicide) it was partly my imagination that saved me. Actually, in retrospect, I think there were other harming parts to my imagination, which prompted me to seek psychiatric help. So, it was definitely an “insult to injury” type set-up. I could also if I had the time and space, describe other incidents where my imagination saved me. So, I guess the question is “why did psychiatry, etc. try to say that which I naturally do and was gifted by God to do is so wrong and a terrible illness?” But then do I really want to know. I think the answer to this horrific problem, is not, in my personal opinion, “reimagination.” One could never reimagine the history of the holocaust of the twentieth century, but in learning to rely on SPIRIT, not the false humanly “created” psychiatry, etc. Thank you.

  • Psychiatry is creepier than Halloween and to me Halloween is pretty creepy. I would describe psychiatry as that haunted house in your neighborhood that just want “go away”, even after it’s been bulldozed for a new condo building or whatever they want to build. Psychiatry makes you sick both inside and outside. In fact, psychiatry is the real sickness. Sadly, so many are just victimized by it. Psychiatry terrorizes and torments its “patients” into submission to their evil ways and practices. Psychiatry might be the most “legitimized” form of what some might call “satanism” in the whole world. I only say legitimized because unfortunately this form of torture is still legal and has yet to be considered any sort of “war crime” although, in my opinion, it is. Creepy really doesn’t even describe psychiatry. Thank you.

  • I could say “totally insane!” Actually, it shows that psychiatry lacks empathy and intelligence. It also shows a lot of characters in tv, movies, literature, etc. would have this very sick diagnosis. Actually, in my case, they already tried to force me out of grieving after my sister passed away twenty years ago this month with their drugs and therapizing. It didn’t work. eventually, the drugs almost killed me. However, I lived despite it all and there is not a day that goes by that I do not think of her, nor my dad who passed away in 2013, or my grandparents or even a great aunt who passed away when I was twelve. Grief is a part of life. It is both a pleasant and unpleasant part of life. I firmly believe that living through grief is part of the learning curve of life and it is something we must do. If we cannot grieve (and each person, does it to their own unique timetable) then we basically have no compassion for each other and ourselves. It is necessary to the survival of the “species.” One more point is that it is partially our memories of who were, are, or want to be which define each one, both individually and as in the many groups to which we belong. Grieving is part of that and does encompass more than the loss of someone we love. But essentially psychiatry is just too stupid and too uncaring to see this. This is why if we do not survive as a species on this planet, it will only be due to psychiatry, not anything else you may hear otherwise. Thank you.

  • All of what you wrote is mostly right. Traditional Medicine is now as bad as psychiatry in most cases. In a way, traditional medicine has been taking lessons from psychiatry and even exploiting those lessons to the detriment of so many. I am not quite sure about the other things you write, but they do deserve some consideration. Actually, the problem really is that we have lost our way. We have relied on things like psychiatry to cure our ills. MISTAKE! We need to return to the truth. That we are SPIRIT “housed” in “human” bodies or for most on this planet “animal” or “plant” bodies. This is not necessarily to change our eating habits or other habits right this instant. It is to allow ourselves to rely not on the falsehoods propagated by much of false science, especially including psychiatry, which, in my personal opinion has become the “dominant science”. I use the word “science” because I lack a better word. Psychiatry is not science at all, so that immediately explains the state of all which we would traditionally call science in the twenty-first century. SPIRIT will allow us to access the truth about ourselves, both individually and as a community. So, in my opinion, I think the answer is THINK SPIRIT, rather than science, medicine, psychiatry, or even business, government, education, etc. PLEASE REMEMBER: THINK SPIRIT! Thank you.

  • Thank you for the kind comments. I am well-known by friends and family to have been a Freshman English drop-out as I received a “D” on my Freshmen English paper which did influence my Final Grade significantly. I guess that was one on the reasons I ended up as a Psychology Major. It was a default major, but I would have been unhappy as an English major. I never did like Jane Austen or many of those classical type books. I have read “Little Women” several times, but that is about it. Oh yeah, I forget, I’ve seen the many movie versions more times than I have read the book. Thank you.

  • Psychiatrists have been able to get away with delivering substandard health care because of obfuscation. The use the distress and confusion of either the patient or loved ones (family members, etc.) and then basically gaslight them to “obedience.” They also take words and terms and turn them inside out against the patient in question. This is not new nor is it confined to psychiatry. I remember a dermatologist at a government hospital doing this to my parents about a skin issue I had at time. I was about 13 years old or so. My parents, who were very concerned, tried to press the doctor on whether it was malignant or not. He was so vague that my parents got irritated and stopped taking me to this doctor. That issue, in question, disappeared as I grew into adulthood and magically, it must not have been malignant because I am still here. I have seen this type of technique even used in what was said job interviews and then taken against after the individual after being hired. Psychiatrists may have just taken it to a new level. And right now, they are harnessing mass media and recruiting soldiers even amongst their victims, who are tragically unaware. Thank you.

  • I am confused. Are you faulting capitalism or marxism or both for the proliferation of psychiatry and its horrible effect on society, government, culture, etc.? In my personal opinion, psychiatry, because of its inherent evil, is subject to being exploited by any and all government and economic systems. Oh no, I just see/hear another news tv report trying to make the world feel guilt and shame because they allegedly don’t pay attention to “mental health/illness/suicide?” like so many think they should i.e., do-gooders, mass media, government, etc. So much, many have not yet figured out, understood, or even realized that they are being conned? If they did realize that psychiatry would essentially be out of business and people would be happier, healthier and live longer! Thank you.

  • Thank you. My English is not perfect, and I am a “native speaker” and it is the only language I have ever really known. Of course, there are times that sometimes other native English speakers do not understand. I think it’s partly my accent and sometimes the “sayings” I might use. My English has been influenced by my Southern and Southwestern roots. That, to me, is what is interesting about English. It has been influenced by so much. Thank yo.

  • After having been in the system and at times, being called “treatment resistant” for not only depression, but other of those psychiatric labels as “deemed” by the DSM; I consider “treatment resistant” to really mean that you are not sick at all; you do not have the alleged illness we say you have; you are actually healthy and well, etc. In summary and in my opinion; “treatment resistant” means psychiatry failed and could not prove their hypothesis that you are sick at all with whatever they claim that you are sick with…Thank you.

  • 1) How can these psychiatrists deliver quality health care when they do is as far from health as say, Neptune is to the Sun—-no farther and Neptune is a very cold place and unlivable to Earthlings. 2) Yes, at present, psychiatrists do receive compensation from Medicare and Medicaid like traditional medical doctors (the ones you go see when you get a ‘hangnail.’) 3.) Miranda Spencer has an excellent post on this matter, as we seem to all agree. and 4.) Why do we waste our time worrying how beset the psychiatrists are with self-esteem and other issues now called “personality disorders” that used to be neuroses. Come to think of it, who really has the personality disorder or actually any alleged diagnoses as described in the DSM? Could it be the psychiatrist after all? I shudder to think. Thank you.

  • I tend to agree with you. The 12 step programs are far superior to traditional psychiatry and therapy. And a good 12 step program allows those in similar circumstances to meet and learn and gain support from each other. Traditional psychiatry and therapy lacks that important type of “community support.” I imagine that one would think “group therapy” might be different. But, having myself been involved in group therapy, I have found to either be a “free for all” or just a reinforcement of negativity and distress. 12 step programs, in my opinion, seek to help the person learn positive ways to deal with life’s stresses. That you rarely get in psychiatry and therapy. One of the books that help “save” my life from psychiatry, the drugs and therapy was a 12 step program book, although I was unable to become involved directly in such a program. Thank you.

  • True. Because only people who want to answer will answer. There is also no way to guard against if people are actually telling the truth as in the actual re-phrasing of questions, etc. Telephone polling has become very unreliable. Why would anyone think any difference of internet polling? I could spend hours and days reporting significant issues in this type of polling. The question may be why waste the time. It is extremely difficult to compare nations in particular due to varying values and other circumstances which can rarely be appropriately measured. Thank you

  • I think is sadly very true. So, in my opinion, we do have either capitalism, socialism, communism or marxism as a government. We have a corporation as a government. Some could say that this was inevitable with capitalism, but in my opinion, almost any government or economic system could be the cause or contributing factor. I think this is the case, also in communist or formerly communist countries, too. It was only a matter a time and an unfortunate natural progression. What could be next? Anarchy? That doesn’t sound too appealing, either. However, I will try to stay optimistic that eventually a better, more humane form of government will result. Thank you.

  • le cox You are right science sees “animals” as mechanical objects. They, sadly, see humans as mechanical object and they totally disregard any notion of Spirit. It is a tragedy. I t actually contributes to making us into a throw-away society where life becomes a commodity and not just plants and animals are expendable, but humans, too. Psychiatry seems to best exemplify this, but this is a very contagious infection and now infects almost all science and traditional medicine. It extends to non-scientific endeavors and issues, too.. I really appreciate your contributions on this matter. Thank you.

  • I think the problem with the word, “animal” is that it can be used so many different ways. Think of Walt Whitman’s famous poem, “I think I could turn and live with animals. They are so placid and self-contained.” (I hope I remembered this quote correctly.) or “He or she is such an animal!” or the concepts and story of the book, “Anmimal Farm” by George Orwell. We are undoubtedly confused. Some say Human Beings are basically animals, mammals to be exact and others really, and even strongly, reject that scientific concept. The Native Americans speak of “four legged” versus “Humans” as “two-legged” and then they speak of those that fly, crawl, swim, etc. I, too have always felt usually much more comfortable around those not necessarily “human like me.” I even joked that I wish it were these fellow creatures who were interviewing me for jobs rather those who did interview me as perhaps I would more easily get hired. Sometimes, these distinctions may be necessary. Sometimes, they are not. Maybe, especially, in present times, the concept of “robot” is more apt, or even the concept from “Star Trek,” of the “Borg” who claimed “Resistance is Futile.” We laughed when they said that on tv back in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but were they, then, giving a glimpse of the future to be. Honestly, I am not sure if Walt Whitman was right about “animals being so placid and self-contained.” But I will say, many times, they can be more life-affirming company than many humans. Thank you.

  • Thank you so much for putting your effort into this writing and into your blog by putting in English. Some say English is now the “universal language.” That, I don’t know for sure. However, putting your story in English, whether in this format or in a blog is extremely helpful to me so that I can learn of your story. I am neither lazy nor stupid, but reasons almost unknown to me, I am, for some reason, unable to learn any foreign languages (languages other than my native English) and even more soy to retain any knowledge of them. I think I knew this before they prescribed me the dangerous and brain damaging psychiatric drugs. However, now this inability is even greater. So, I really appreciate your story. I do feel that individual stories are more important and more truthful and enlightening about the evils of the psychiatric industry than any statistical data which can be skewed towards any bias and are thus, usually, just useless. Thank you.

  • “Love those neuro-toxins.” I just love doing toxic things to my brain. It makes me feel whole and part of the “big boy/girl group.” Otherwise, I am small and tiny and way too kind and gentle with myself.
    “Love those neuro-toxins” It’s how I feel like the “real me.” “Drugged and ready to be brain-washed and humiliated by a trained therapist.”
    “Love those neuro-toxins” Did you know that all the psychiatrists, their enablers, the therapists, and the victims, the “patients” all began as babies—drinking milk.
    “love those neuro-toxins” I feel so whole and dirty inside. A Wholly “hell” of one dirty person inside.
    Funny, how when I finally stopped taking these psychiatric drugs, how I felt so clean inside.—so clean and no longer dirty and stinking inside. I think that’s why the psychiatrists prescribe. They really don’t want the patients to have that clean inside feeling, because they’re envious as it’s something they will probably never have—unless they “come clean” and tell the truth and stop prescribing these “neuro-toxins.” Thank you.

  • Actually, in the west, particularly in America and in Canada, to complain about racism is well respected thinking by some. As far as sexism, goes, it has in the past also well-respected to complain about sexism. Sadly, in my opinion, these things get rather trendy, and it depends on the particular trends at the time. However, this type of reflex response thinking really doesn’t solve anything and nothing is solved. In fact, sometimes, these trends backfire and go backwards. What I trying to say is that much of what passes as intelligent thought is just a trend, a fad like the hula hoops of the ninety fifties. People, then, think they are contributing to making the world a better place, but it can be an illusion. I wish it were not so. It is like the weather in many parts of the country—wait around awhile and the weather will change. Of course, set against these trends are good people who really are trying to do something but so many times they don’t get heard. The problems with psychiatry have this effect and sometimes they don’t get heard. Usually, they affect people in so many different ways but so many don’t want to hear. Maybe one day the issues regarding psychiatry will be heard at least superficially. To those who done their best to fight these “ism” issues, I say keep trying. Thank you.

  • In my opinion, in regard to psychiatry, medicine and other subjects, we do conflate and inflate way too, which if we choose, for instance the anti-psychiatry stance we are not even at the “starting gate.” We expect politics and both elected and non-elected political officials to be the answer. They are not. Even an elected official’s donor history will not prove how they will vote or what their true beliefs around a matter are. Elected officials are just as vulnerable to the influence of not only their constituents, but also their colleagues and probably, even more so, the lobbyists that hover in legislative and other circles. If we want to change things, we must extricate ourselves from the political realm. Like mass media, these days, the bargains made are sadly very rarely, for anyone’s good. additionally, the idea of “evidence-based medicine” reflects very deeply how medicine is no longer medicine for health and well-being, but now is just another arm of the entire legal system. The idea of “evidence” used to, say convict a criminal, is one thing. But now we use “evidence” to convict someone in physical/mental distress. This is the tragedy. “Evidence” belongs in the courtroom. It does not belong in the doctor’s office or examining room, no matter the specialty of the doctor. Thank you.

  • Interesting article–but I share the skepticism of “Marie.” Perhaps the alleged distress of the English speaking and other wealthier countries lies in the fear/worry that their values of individualism/achievement, etc. are being threatened in some manner. This has been most recently reflected in much of the response to covid as in lockdowns, remote learning, masks, etc. Of course, the decisions regarding covid, such as these, helped some and harmed others. Oh, well, back to the drawing board in the areas of individualism and achievement, etc. and how can we make it work for everyone in a positive way and still benefit society? But then so few really want to study this issue through healthy debate. Decisions just want to made these days in such an arbitrary, impersonal manner. It’s a business decision, nothing personal. Thank you.

  • I know this article addresses psychiatrists and their failure to tell the patient the truth about the adverse effects of the antipsychotic drug or drugs or even if there might be what the medical community calls “Contraindications.” But sadly, this also happens in traditional medicine. My mother was prescribed a different thyroid drug that interacted with the blood pressure drugs she was taking. The thyroid drug and the blood pressure interacted so adversely that she began to have trouble seeing and this occurred while she was driving. Was the doctor unaware? Could the pharmacist not see it? I don’t know. But the lack of ethical sensibility in prescribing drugs and explaining the side effects or considering the interaction between/amongst other prescribed prescription drugs is dangerous and tragically is no longer confined to just psychiatry. It is obvious that the influence on psychiatry is far beyond psychiatry and its influence has become very dangerous. Thank you.

  • Your article is very interesting, and I appreciate your honesty in dealing with both your education and changing ideas about it. I actually obtained a bachelor’s degree in Psychology at a large university here in the States. I received this degree before the advent of the infamous Prozac, “pills for personality” was a headline I read a few years later in what have been called a “women’s magazine. When I was in college, I took a class that I doubt has survived, considering the current climate in psychology/psychiatry. The class was called “Normal Personality” and we used a “textbook” written by one of the professors. I don’t have that textbook anymore, but I remember this odd picture of a circle that emphasized how “kookiness” beget “kookiness.” I think it was an example of what they used to call “self-fulfilling prophecy.” To me, now it is a “model” of how “psychiatry/psychology” operates now. Except, add the drugs into the recipe. In my opinion, much of therapy is just there to reinforce the need to the “patient” for the drugs they’ve been prescribed and that if they don’t take them, only disaster will result. I do hope that the methods you have learned and wish to employ do not reinforce the alleged need for dangerous drugs and also that the idea the patient is dangerously mentally ill because they experience emotion in any way. In my opinion, “psychiatry/psychology” changed for the worst when “Prozac” came out in the late 1980s. Yes, there were drugs before that, even dangerous drugs. But when “Prozac” came out, even more that than “valium” and the benzos came out, the whole world became mentally ill in the eyes of these psychiatrists. Each person became just a ready vessel for at least one or more of these psychiatrist drugs. In my opinion, that which was “normal” became “abnormal” And then after the tragedy of 9/11, we learned a new terminology, “new normal.” “My new normal” is heard in ads and from lots of people these people these days. But this “new normal” sounds like “abnormal” to me. What is normal and what is not normal? Maybe, it just doesn’t matter as long as we can get to place we can uniauely call happiness. Thank you.

  • Sadly, so many people have lost sight of God and even Jesus Christ in the extent of things. It is God who is charge of the planet, not us mere Humans. And, in God, we will find our answers. There is absolutely no political or economic system that has the answer that even comes close to the answer found only in God. “In Him, (Christ), we live, and move, and have our being.” Perhaps, the answer to all the crises in the world, including psychiatry and big pharma, etc. is Prayer. In fact, in my humble opinion, it is the only answer. All other answers are human-oriented and are thus essentially flawed. Prayer is the only answer that leads us flawed human beings to communicate with the perfection that only belongs to God. Thank you.

  • It is, at present, terribly incorrect to assume America, is a “capitalist” society. It is still an aspiration no fully realized. Our economic system is a jumble of both good and bad and is sadly easily exploited. Big Pharma and Psychiatry are only one piece of a larger puzzle. To throw Marx into the mess, sounds admirable, at first, for some, whose belief systems might entertain them, but in the end it only produces another deflection and distraction from the problems that we might be facing. It will always be useless to blame any one economic system or conversely to falsely believe any one economic system is the answer to our problems. L.e. Cox has mentioned “spirit.” Until we finally accept that we are spiritual beings and our mind comes from God and that which proceeds from the Mind is our brain/body; all attempts at true success. When we do accept that truth, then and only then, will we be able to distinctly characterize any “disorders” and apply correct knowledge as to any possible “cures” or “adaptations” that might be made to the individual for a better life. Until then, it will be a struggle we really don’t need or deserve. Thank you.

  • There are very few, if any, valid diagnoses in the DSM. Much of it is like an astrological chart. Most, if any real diagnoses rarely make it to the DSM. Also, even if there is a weakly possible valid diagnosis in the DSM, the symptom list rarely fits and, yes, it is not highly stigmatizing, but is fully ensconced in human bias so as to be damaging, in a multitude of ways, not only to the individual receiving the diagnosis, but to the family, the community and society at large. Thank you.

  • With all due respect, I do not think “sandgroper” is either “mansplaining” of attempting to lecture anyone of feed her ego. I only think that she is stating the facts regarding complaints made, the laws and directives, and the possible consequences. Every act does have consequences and must be fully addressed before committing that act, even acts that could produce good. Sometimes, even an act that could produce good, can leave an unintentional trail of evil which must and should be addressed, if possible. This is as t rue with psychiatry, as with any other issue affecting each one of us personally, or society, or the world, for that matter. There are parts of her statements that I both agree and disagree with, but I definitely respect her right to state her knowledge and her opinion. Of course, this is my humble and unique opinion and can be disregarded, if so desired. Thank you.

  • This is very interesting, but it appears that, in this is the case, as in both in many scientific studies and most social science studies, the authors of the study already had a pre-determined bias and sought to prove it. Thus, the conclusions of the study were most probably determined before even the study was carried. If the study had been done by those with a different bias, then the results might have been significantly altered. Therefore, I am skeptical of all such studies and am concerned that they would further bring us apart as humans into our little camps, rather than to discover both our common humanity and our uniqueness as individuals. Which, in the end, instead of emphasizing tolerance, kindness, dignity and respect; they throw all those good qualities as human beings out in the window, so to speak. Thank you.

  • I agree that almost all mental illness diagnoses are very probably “hoaxes.” I think, in many “mental illness diagnoses”, the real issue is ignored. I think it might actually be a n underlying medical condition or even what could be termed a “learning disorder or difficulty.” As far as the Autism/Asperger’s Spectrum, I am not sure why that might be considered a “hoax”, too. In my opinion, it appears that many who have been diagnosed with this, may have been adversely affected by toxins in the environment or otherwise. I, personally, am terribly uncomfortable in lumping these “disorders” along with the alleged “mental illness disorders.” It also appears to me that in considering “Autism/Asperger’s” as “hoaxes” we may accusing the parents in a negative light, and this may hurt even those who have “Autism/Asperger’s.” There is a much to learn about these matters and it probably would behoove us not to jump to conclusions that could hurt so many. Thank you.

  • Your comment is very interesting. It appears the point being made is that if you choose to refuse further treatment and attempt withdrawals from the psychiatric drug or drugs, you affect not only yourself, but others. Yes, this is true. It is also true that if you continue on this drug or drugs, you will affect not only yourself but others. It is also true that withdrawal from any one of these psychiatric drugs can take months or even years, whether it is abrupt (“cold turkey”) or the tapering method. it is also perhaps true that these psychiatric drugs may even remain in the system past withdrawal. However, it is important to reiterate that these psychiatric drugs can and do cause brain damage, metabolic damage, and even damage to other organs. Continued use of these drugs can shorten the lifespan of the individual. This affects not only oneself, but others, also. How one makes that choice depends on the individual. In my case, the choice was made for me. After many years on psychiatric drugs, my brain/body fell into a nearly comatose state and I almost died. There was a moment of time that it was even considered I would need long term care because I would be either in a vegetative state or near vegetative state. As it is said, I thank God that I am still alive. The problem may that these psychiatric drugs can and do, unfortunately, kill and that affects other people also. Yes, research can help the withdrawal process, but there are many of us who never even had that chance. Like many drugs, it is better to not even begin them. Perhaps, the best thing for us to do is to promote the concept of education before accepting the prescription. This is a difficult one, as it seems there are increasingly more and more accepted for use. I think if we begin with promoting education, then each person can make a wise choice whether to accept the prescription or not. But it is an uphill battle and it may years. But the question may be is the battle worth the lives of the vulnerable? Each of us must uniquely answer that question. Also, the question needs to be asked to help those already using these drugs to assist their finding a safe way out. This may not help everyone. I was one of the individuals that it probably would not have helped, because even after my near death experience, it took me another two years before I realized that it was the drugs who did the damage. At that time, my brain/body reject any remaining drugs that I was taking such as lithium. I don’t have any real answers, except that each person needs caring support so their life can be saved and they also need to ability to make an educated decision on this matter. Of course, there are still those who apparently have no choice in their decision, such as children and even those who must take these drugs as consequences of legal actions taken actions against them. This, too, is an uphill battle as to how to protect such vulnerable people. Thank you.

  • I defend anyone’s right to use the words, “communism” or “marxism” or even “socialism” and speak against it. This is because all three, which have shades of difference, are forms of government that are very ant-human and even anti-animal and anti-plant, etc. One especially is predominant in these alleged governmental forms is actually how they are akin to psychiatry, especially as it is practiced currently in the “Westernized World.” Thank you.

  • I know that there has been some criticism about the title of your article. I think that attempting to construct a good title for any article or book can be quite difficult at times. So, at the very least, I some leniency in judgement is necessary. However, I will try to gently give a little suggestion about the title. In my silly opinion of which you can freely disregard if you feel it doesn’t work for you, is that if you chose to re-title this excellent article, you might want to personalize the title in “How I Self-Harmed and How I Stopped It.” This does not preclude you from also giving examples of others you have met and their self-harming stories too and essentially comparing it to your own or what you feel is necessary to tell your unique story. What I really appreciate about MIA is that it does allow unique stories to be told in relationship to various psychiatric experiences. sometimes, we all seek to judge the experiences and opinions of others in a negative light and I, too, am guilty of this, but I try to keep it at a minimum unless I feel challenged negatively by own personal experiences in both life and in the psychiatric system. Also, in my personal opinion, which does not seem to be shared by all, is that the goal should be to stop “self- harming.” Having, like I said, done this to myself I consider this to be quite a dangerous act to do to oneself. But in most cases, people do not need condemnation to stop, but gentle encouragement to stop. I know there are those who proclaim the famous slogan, “My Body, My Choice” to justify their actions. However, in my opinion, if you justify that by refusing psychiatric drugs, which we increasingly know cause harm; then it should follow the same with the action of “self-harming.” After having taken psychiatric drugs and “self-harmed” I personally see very little difference. But I know there are many who seem to disagree. This is a conclusion that I came to after my withdrawal from the psychiatric drugs. Each person must come to his or her own conclusion about this matter. Please keep up the good work. I am sure that you have many stories to share with the MIA Audience and I know that I, personally, would like to hear them. Thank you

  • “like the Vietnam Vets who threw their medals back.” I am a proud daughter of a Vietnam Vet who did not throw his medals back, but served proudly, and passed away in a Veteran’s Hospital nine years ago. Those who threw their medals back—it was their decision. But there are many who did not and to equate to them psychiatrists renouncing their credentials is, in my opinion, tragically absurd. It is time we thank all our veterans for their service, especially the Vietnam Vets. This would seek to heal the unfortunate wounds foisted upon our Vietnam Vets, partly by mass media and it would also heal their families, their spouses and their children who, also, suffered from such misguided thinking prevalent at that time. It is time to heal the wounds of the past and to bring up “Vietnam Vets who threw their medals back.” is both spurious and hurtful. I am sorry to disagree with you, but, like they say, “this is personal.” Thank you.

  • With all due respect, I am not trying to put my beliefs onto anyone else. I am only trying to suggest that in harming oneself, the power balance shifts and usually not in the power of the one who harms oneself. I realize that you may not agree and that is your right. It took me years, getting off psychiatric drugs and therapy, and then looking at my own life history. Looking at my own life history has taught me a lot and could not be done while underneath the curse of psychiatric drugs and conventional therapy. And, in my opinion, it could not be done if I were “self-harming” which, yes, might also be considered a form of therapy, also. However, in my opinion, psychiatric drug therapy, conventional talk therapy, and “self-harming” all do have something in common–harming oneself and transferring one’s power to someone else (although in “self-harm” one usually does it alone) Additionally, “self-harm” can become an addiction like drugs or alcohol. I noticed when I was “self-harming” the similarities to my drinking while in college and just out of college. But in odd turn of events, I developed a nearly deadly allergy to alcohol, almost akin to many who must suffer through peanut allergies. Perhaps, I have developed an allergy to “self-harm” just recently. I do not know. Recently, I was verbally abused by someone who might be considered an alleged authority figure. I did briefly consider “self-harm” in response to the situation. Although, I am still upset by the situation, I did not “self-harm” as that would be giving this person the power not deserved. I am dealing with the situation on other ways. Thank you.

  • With all due respect, I have every right to have my opinion and to suggest an honest debate might be appropriate. An honest debate would get us to the crux of the matter and might save lives. Additionally, an honest debate could be very useful in keeping our children and adults from being prescribed these very dangerous stimulant drugs. To not debate an issue is to give in to the psychiatrists’ side. To invite a debate is to clear the air of all nebulous issues. The anti-psychiatry side does not benefit when there is no debate. Only the psychiatry side wins. If we cannot debate our position, we lose, because it reflects that we have no conviction of our beliefs. To bring a debate on ADHD and ADD out in the open would be to clarify the issue for once and for all. I am sorry that you cannot see my side of this. Thank you.

  • Thank you for your kind comments. I think that I had a copy of the book you mention in your post, but unfortunately lost it in a recent move. I have read a few books on Buddhism, but I confess I still don’t entirely understand it, still, I respect it. The book you mention is quite a beautiful book, if I remember correctly with some very beautiful pictures and both Biblical Scripture and Buddhist Scripture with an emphasis on commonality. However, I really like what you said at the end of your post… we are as “loving brothers” (although, in my case, I’m more of a “sister”) and yes “our common “enemy” is the pseudoscience of psychiatry. . .” Thank you.

  • With all due respect, I cannot agree with you, but I appreciate your response. I will still hold the belief that in harming oneself, we give our power to those who we believe have harmed us. It hurts to harm oneself. I know. Why fix one hurt with another hurt? That, I will never be able to understand. But, thank you for expressing your opinion. Thank you.

  • I think there can be an honest debate as to whether there can be a “diagnosis” of either ADHD or ADD. There even then might be an honest debate as to appropriate treatment to be utilized’ diet, lifestyle changes, vitamin supplementation, etc. And this can be true for both children and adults. However, there should be absolutely no debate as to the use of any “mind-altering” type drug, much less dangerous stimulants that are amphetamine based like Ritalin and Adderall. And I would also suggest other stimulants not necessarily amphetamine based. I am not sure about caffeine as it is so widely used, available, and accepted. Also, the debate should center on how unique and individual each person and that should be reflected in treatment. But, again, back to the stimulant drugs… Why, in God’s name do we think it is alright to give such dangerous drugs that have very illegal substances and can even be the basis of “meth” and “meth labs?” When I was growing up, many girls my age got hooked onto diet pills, a very similar drug; so, I was totally confused when they began to prescribe these same types of drugs for ADHD and ADD. We were told these drugs were dangerous and they are. It is just child abuse to prescribe children these drugs. As far as adults, it is just also a form of abuse. Once, a psychiatrist prescribed Adderall for me. She said it would improve my focus in a very challenging work situation. For me, it did nothing. So, I told her and stopped taking the drug. Children should usually don’t have that privilege and some adults just get hooked and don’t know it. The fact that drugs are prescribed to both children and adults that would be considered illegal otherwise, to me, is beyond the pale. I feel sorry for parents that must confront this in schools by forceful teachers and staff. I know, if I were in that situation, I would definitely consider homeschooling rather than endanger my child, probably for the rest of his or her life. I can say no further. To prescribe these types of drugs to children, especially, but also adults, is nothing less than a Biblical Abomination. Thank you.

  • I must have missed that evidence that there is no “God in the traditional sense.” It’s probably a good idea that I did, since Jesus Christ, His Son, saved my life from the evils of psychiatric drugs, nine years ago this Spring when I almost died. Without God, without Jesus, I would be dead now from those drugs, etc. Each day, I thank Him for my very life. Thank you, Jesus. Thank you.

  • Having “self-harmed” myself in the past, I cannot understand why anyone would argue for doing it? I do think the only person who can stop oneself from doing it is the person doing it to him or herself. At one time, I did this (which was actually before the psych drug time) an enlightened counselor suggested I write a contract with myself to not do it. The contract worked. I carried it around in my billfold until it faded away and became pieces of scrap paper. Sadly, by the time I was involved in the toxic psych drug world of today. (or rather some years past) I can see no good in harming oneself. In my person history, it was almost always a reaction to very critical people who, in some manner, were trying to take advantage of me. But, then, in consideration of this, my actions of self-harm did nothing to stop their mean-spiritedness. It only took away my power and actually, in a subversive way, gave them power. At the very least, in my mind, when we self-harm, we do not control our pain or our power, we actually gives those we believe who are harming us the power. The question, which may be a philosophical or religious question, is “do we really have the right to harm ourselves?” If we do, then, for instance, it makes taking these psychiatric drugs which harm so many, a moral thing to do. So again, who wins, those who promote these drugs, the very people we have claimed who harmed us—psychiatrists, big pharma, etc. It is a dead end street. It takes courage to stop a harmful act and find better ways to deal with those who abuse us in mean-spirited ways. But, it is necessary or the balance of power shifts to them, not us and obscures the truth that “it is them, not us.” Thank you.

  • Yes, it seems that we have gotten so scared of our emotions; anger, sadness, grief, even joy and happiness and all the others that to even show an emotion, for any reason, is to at the very least lose respect from others or worse. It is my opinion, that this fear of our God-given emotions leads in part to high rates of violence especially amongst our young people, which, in turn increases the murder rate in so many cities across the country. I think when we learn to value our emotions and stop ostracizing and shunning people when they show their emotions, these high rates of violence should go down. We need to let people know it’s okay to be who you are, and these emotions are naturally a part of you. This will assist people in learning how to channel those emotions for good, rather than for evil.

  • I appreciate your story. It is well-written and states a lot of truth. I self-harmed for a while and most of it did go back to the psychiatric drugs prescribed me. Although, I am off the psychiatric drugs and consider myself a walk-away from the system, it still enters my mind sometimes. I notice that occurs when I feel threatened from the abusive talk of others (usually those who only think they are in some sort of authority position over me) specifically towards me. When this occurs, it does dredge up all the old terrors of my heart and mind. But now that I am free of the psychiatric drug and therapy system, I do not do it. I just write in my journal about how terrible I feel. Of course, there was a time when I was in the system that actually writing in my journal non-stop all night almost was considered “manic” rather than “therapeutic.” Psychiatry is actually the basis of that old line, “You can’t win for losing.” Like I wrote you said much truth here and I really applaud the fact that you spoke with such bravery. I was also reminded of the eleven useless days I spent in an alleged mental hospital. All we did was sit around, watch one of the TVs in one of the two dayrooms, wait for our evening drug call, and eat yogurt for breakfast. I still can’t eat yogurt to this day and that was nine years ago. There is further to that story, but I shall stop there. Thank you.

  • Thank you for your kind words. I was re-reading what I said, especially the part “just about everyone.” As I began to consider what I wrote, I now think that “just about everyone” should even include these psychiatrists that are causing so many so much suffering. Why do I say that? These psychiatrists do not realize that they are not only causing the suffering of others, but their very own suffering, too. At the very least, they, too, are victims of their own propaganda. At the very most, they are also victims of the same treatments (drugs, etc.) that they prescribe. In the world of the psychiatric, no one comes out unscathed. In short, psychiatrists are victims of their own psychiatry. And again, I remind all that due to the world of the psychiatric, all other worlds that do pertain to the “brain” become hidden and true understanding, learning, adaptation, and tolerance for self and others basically get crushed or cancelled. Thank you.

  • Number one: Sometimes, especially in psychiatry, “gently” can be misleading. “Gentleness” ins some settings with some psychiatrists can actually lead to the worst possible outcome, as in unnecessary drugging. Number two: There may very well be changes in the brain when one is sad or otherwise. However, there really is no way to discover these changes. Also, changes for each person’s brain are probably unique to that person, that, of course, would be contrary to psychiatric training. Currently, psychiatric training is to basically see humans as a monolithic unit. Number three: It is already proven fact that these psychiatric drugs they use to treat this supposed condition only prove to worsen the situation and even cause brain damage. Other methods such as ECT also prove to worsen the situation. What is the answer for the sad, lonely people of the world? Well, the truth is we really don’t need psychiatrists, but the love and friendship of each other. No matter our failings, weaknesses, issues, problems, disagreements, etc. we need respect, dignity, and understanding from each other and maybe from ourselves which can be the most difficult. But, until we get to that point, I have no real answers. Thank you.

  • l. e. cox questioned, “you think the mind is product of the brain?” I wonder, if perhaps, the brain, in fact, the whole body is not actually a product of the mind. If you consider that the mind is Spirit or of God and if you consider yourself as a creation of God, then, in my manner of thinking that really might be the correct answer. I propose that is why psychiatry is its current state, especially as evidenced by the DSM, dismisses any concept of a “mind” and can only think of the brain as just one big biochemical computer. This is a dangerous shame, because not only does the good stay hidden, but also the true, real issues that need to be addressed are thus not addressed all hidden under the cloak of a psychiatric diagnosis. Then some pills are prescribed, some therapy attempted, and all is well. But it isn’t. First is the damage caused by the pills and second the augmenting damage from therapy which reinforces that damage. Eventually, the brain and body reach such a stress point that it either must die, become a vegetable or get better in some manner. And the only way the last one can be accomplished is though the Spirit or God. The other two, more tragic to our humanity, may also have the input of God or Spirit for God or Spirit’s reasons. The upshot of all this is that until we accept the fact that all that is comes from Mind (Spirit or God) and thus the brain and the body both originate from and in the Mind, nothing will be accomplished. And many will suffer, the least of which is that psychiatry, in its greedy desire to control, will continue to hide the real truth of their suffering (which may not be suffering at all if learning and adaptation to one’s specific situation occurs) from their “patients”. I think there is a future out there but not until we seriously consider regulating psychiatry, instead of giving free, unbridled reign over a very vulnerable population (which includes about everyone). Thank you.

  • The Community Mental Health Act sounded good in practice, but it did come into being before the major dependence on psychiatric drugs in treatment. There were some psychiatric drugs available that time, but it was not until “Prozac” and into the 90s’ that these drugs became the first line of care. This proved to the detriment of all, but particularly the “patient.” And it was at that time, I think, that many, such as clergy and others who had been providing counseling and care were more likely to refer their clients to these psychiatrists or to others who could dispense these drugs and also deliver diagnoses as based on the DSM. Additionally, the insurance companies became heavily involved with their “managed care concept” in which to them psychiatric drugs are considered as the quickest, easiest and most financially feasible way to get results. Now, what do we have is a heavily drugged society getting more heavily drugged. In the process, the issues and problems that need to be addressed are not addressed. In my opinion, this includes learning disorders or difficulties which, if not careful get hidden under a mental health diagnosis and the subsequent drugging which causes further issues. There are other things impacting these like toxic substances in the air, water and earth, including even these drugs in our groundwater. I believe all this contributes to higher rates of issues like “autism” and related disorders. One might also consider “Alzheimer’s” which is rising amongst older adults as another aspect of this. I do not know if we have an adequate answer to these issues at present. We must consider that these psychiatric drugs actually do cause or contribute to any alleged symptoms of alleged mental illness. Right now, we are not in a position to completely get rid of all these psychiatric drugs, even if there was a community and legal consensus as to their danger, which there is not, yet. So, the best thing we can do at the moment is assist those impacted and their families in any manner possible. It would also behoove us to not consider diagnoses such as “autism” as hoaxes, because they do affect the family structure in all kinds of ways. Each person, each family needs assistance, not always financially, to help them with the circumstances of which have been wrought upon them. Thank you.

  • In my personal opinion, this “wimp” theory makes it too easy to blame one’s problems and maybe to not seek answers to one’s problems, whether on an individual level or a societal level. I do not want to over-complicate life, as many do, especially psychiatrists and many academics, yet we can over-simplify life, too. This “Wimp” theory seems to do that. We have a world where many people pf different races and creeds have contributed to it, in both good and not-so-good ways. It would behoove to look at their contributions not necessarily from a racial or sexual perspective, but from considering their actual contributions. To do otherwise is to box ourselves into a corner into which we may never be allowed out. Thank you.

  • Although many seem to blame capitalism for the mainstreaming of the fraudulent science of psychiatry; it is not capitalism that is the problem. It is the fact that we have allowed capitalism along with its companion democracy to weaken. We have allowed ideologue types to exploit our weakest points. So free speech has degenerated into cancelled speech in the name of what—a false democracy. This probably could not happen without the help of psychiatry. I have written that all of psychology is evil. But, perhaps, not all, but most. And I am now to the belief that the rise of psychiatry is the rise of the what is probably the most evil of all psychology—“abnormal psychology.” It is in those little abnormal psych classes in high school and college of which perhaps the degeneration of mankind begins. Other areas of psychology may perhaps offer so good to society; but as long as we place our emphasis on abnormal psychology as does psychiatry, no good can result. This is turn, weakens both capitalism and democracy; therefore we falsely believe that capitalism is the problem when it is really anarchy masquerading as marxism, communism, socialism, leftism, i.e. going “woke.” etc. Thank you.

  • I am beginning to question if alleged mental illnesses may not really be demonic possessions of the individua Therefore, the psychiatrist is actually making the problem worse through drug, talk therapy, and other treatments when the person really needs the intervention of a member of the religious clergy. Before the enlightenment and science took over the world, that was the common belief. The question that few want to consider is that that could still be the truth even now in the 21st century. Thus, that would make much of what we thought as a medical problem to really be a spiritual/religious problem and explains a lot as to why mental illness theories and practices ultimately fail. It may also explain why there is so much what we would otherwise consider societal ills, such as violent crimes, etc. I don’t know. This is just an idea to really consider and question, especially after reading this article. And if that were the actual truth, could it be that the enlightenment which has influenced so much even now into the twentieth century may not be so enlightened after all with the truth being that we do need God and not psychiatry as the answer to our problems. Thank you.