People Financially Affected by COVID-19 Experience More Psychological Distress than Others

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From the Pew Research Center: “Perceptions of personal threat from the outbreak – whether physical or financial – are also associated with higher levels of psychological distress. Among those who see the outbreak as a major threat to their personal health, about one-third (32%) fall into the high distress category; among those who say it is not a threat to their health, just 16% do. And 30% who see the outbreak as a major threat to their personal financial situation fall into the high distress category, compared with 18% among those who say it is not a threat.

People who report difficulty dealing with child care responsibilities during this time of school closings and work-from-home obligations – about one-third of those with young children – may be experiencing higher levels of psychological distress. Among those who have children under 12 living in the home and who say that child care responsibilities during the outbreak have been ‘somewhat’ or ‘very difficult,’ 34% fall into the high distress group, a number that rises to 42% among women.”

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