SSRI Withdrawal has Social, Cognitive, and Emotional Consequences

New research finds that the non-physical aspects of withdrawal from SSRIs are often overlooked.

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A recent article published in the Health Expectations journal reveals that discontinuing the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI withdrawal) has an impact on the emotional, cognitive, and social aspects of the lives of users, in addition to causing physical withdrawal symptoms. The study, led by Raqeeb Mahmood from the University of Bath, also suggests that withdrawing from SSRIs has positive effects on health.

The authors write:

“The lived experience of withdrawal significantly impacts individuals’ well‐being. Participants emphasized that withdrawal is not just about physical side effects but also affects their emotional, cognitive, and social functioning.”

Pattern of blue and yellow pills or tablets on a pink background. concept of medicine, pharmacy and coronavirus. copy space

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Richard Sears
Richard Sears teaches psychology at West Georgia Technical College and is studying to receive a PhD in consciousness and society from the University of West Georgia. He has previously worked in crisis stabilization units as an intake assessor and crisis line operator. His current research interests include the delineation between institutions and the individuals that make them up, dehumanization and its relationship to exaltation, and natural substitutes for potentially harmful psychopharmacological interventions.

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