Antipsychotics Increase Retrovirus Activity in Humans

Kermit Cole
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Endogenous retroviruses, remnants of ancient infections that have become part of the human genome, have been associated with the development of schizophrenia. But researchers in Germany find that elevated endogenous retroviral gene expression may result from treatment with antipsychotics, rather than from schizophrenia itself.
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Kermit Cole
Kermit Cole, MFT, founding editor of Mad in America, works in Santa Fe, New Mexico as a couples and family therapist. Inspired by Open Dialogue, he works as part of a team and consults with couples and families that have members identified as patients. His work in residential treatment — largely with severely traumatized and/or "psychotic" clients — led to an appreciation of the power and beauty of systemic philosophy and practice, as the alternative to the prevailing focus on individual pathology. A former film-maker, he has undergraduate and master's degrees in psychology from Harvard University, as well as an MFT degree from the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia. He is a doctoral candidate with the Taos Institute and the Free University of Brussels. You can reach him at [email protected]

1 COMMENT

  1. Someone didn’t pay attention to the positive qualities of “schizophrenics”, namely their immunity to viral diseases, among other things. But then, this had to be ignored, because it was made public by the psychiatric outlaws, Abram Hoffer and Humphry Osmond in their evil book *How to Live with Schizophrenia*, evil because it discussed the syndrome honestly and because it introduced the public to megavitamin therapy.

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