Long-Term Benzos Worsen Anxiety

Kermit Cole
0
58

Long-term use of benzodiazepines for anxiety remains a widespread, despite guidelines that recommend against it, according to a roundtable discussion at the annual conference of the Anxiety Disorders Association of America. Benzos alleviate anxiety symptoms, but do not resolve the disorder in the long term, with posttreatment relapse rates as high as 63%. Associated learning impairment “significantly diminishes the effects” of cognitive-behavioral therapy, said one speaker; “…the result is reduced anxiety in the moment but worse long-term anxiety reactions documented in both animal and human studies.”

Article →

Previous articleIntact Facial Affect Processing in Schizophrenia
Next articleMost Cases of Tardive Dyskinesia are Permanent
Kermit Cole
Kermit Cole, MFT, founding editor of Mad in America, works in Santa Fe, New Mexico as a couples and family therapist. Inspired by Open Dialogue, he works as part of a team and consults with couples and families that have members identified as patients. His work in residential treatment — largely with severely traumatized and/or "psychotic" clients — led to an appreciation of the power and beauty of systemic philosophy and practice, as the alternative to the prevailing focus on individual pathology. A former film-maker, he has undergraduate and master's degrees in psychology from Harvard University, as well as an MFT degree from the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia. He is a doctoral candidate with the Taos Institute and the Free University of Brussels. You can reach him at [email protected]