30 Years of Antidepressant Addiction

Kermit Cole
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The U.K.’s Mail reports on three women who have been taking antidepressants for 30 years and the “terrifying” addiction they have experienced as a result.

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Kermit Cole
Kermit Cole, MFT, founding editor of Mad in America, works in Santa Fe, New Mexico as a couples and family therapist. Inspired by Open Dialogue, he works as part of a team and consults with couples and families that have members identified as patients. His work in residential treatment — largely with severely traumatized and/or "psychotic" clients — led to an appreciation of the power and beauty of systemic philosophy and practice, as the alternative to the prevailing focus on individual pathology. A former film-maker, he has undergraduate and master's degrees in psychology from Harvard University, as well as an MFT degree from the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia. He is a doctoral candidate with the Taos Institute and the Free University of Brussels. You can reach him at [email protected]

4 COMMENTS

  1. I’m completely fascinated by the phenomenon of human exceptional-ism.

    ‘Clinical depression must be medicated, but only around a quarter of people who say they’re depressed actually are.’

    I would always read mental health articles and convince myself that I was part of that small minority that was “clinical” and “must be medicated”. What a farce put on us all with these made up statistics.

    I will never again read these statistics of clinical as serious and I will never again fall for a “medicated” existence.

    • The comments I can totally agree with. The ones saying I have a “proven” chemical imbalance in the brain!! I have a genetic problem!! Wonder what sorts of tests were done for those things. And of course they have ALL had to have medications changed – as they stopped working!! They are also happy to link them to insulin for diabetes!! insulin does not stop working for diabetes, so why do these drugs stop working for people??

      It is overall quite a good article and given what you have said about it, even more so.

      I do however disagree with the idea that CBT will solve everything. Personally I have found CBT to be so abusive as to be beyond belief, and I am not alone in this. Telling someone to simply think differently is not that simple. A person thinks what they have experienced. If you want a change a persons thoughts you have to change the experiences and they can rarely do that themselves. Those that benefit from CBT have not had any real problems as they simply needed someone to get them out of a rut and not deal with real issues. Well that is my experience anyway.

      CBT is very tightly connected with our blame the individual. Instead of faulty biology it is faulty thoghts and the person can simply fix it all.