Vera Sharav to Speak at Protest of APA Annual Meeting

3
113

Vera Sharav, of the Alliance for Human Research Protection, will be speaking at Mindfreedom’s protest of the American Psychiatric Association annual meeting on Sunday, May 4th, in New York City at 34th St. and 11th Avenue. “Ms. Sharav heroically stood up to Eli Lilly in federal court in Brooklyn over the release of the Zyprexa Papers,” says attorney Jim Gottstein. “Every time Lilly’s Lawyers interrogated her about the way she received the Zyprexa Papers she turned it around on them testifying to the great harm caused by Zyprexa.”

APA Protest Facebook page →

From Jim Gottstein:

“I am very pleased to announce that Vera Sharav of the Alliance for Human Research Protection is coming to the protest and speak.  Ms. Sharav heroically stood up to Eli Lilly in federal court in Brooklyn over the release of the Zyprexa Papers.  Every time Lilly’s Lawyers interrogated her about the way she received the Zyprexa Papers she turned it around on them testifying to the great harm caused by Zyprexa.  For example:

 “the documents document the fact that Eli Lilly knew that the — that Zyprexa causes diabetes. They knew it from a group of doctors that they hired who told them you have to come clean. That was in 2000. And instead of warning doctors who are widely prescribing the drug, Eli Lilly set about in an aggressive marketing campaign to primary doctors. Little children are being given this drug. Little children are being exposed to horrific diseases that end their lives shorter.”

Her entire testimony is available here.  Her testimony was the most dramatic at that trial, refusing in Court to give back the Zyprexa Papers she had received because of their great importance to public health.  To me, her testimony is what would make a movie about the Zyprexa Papers.

Previous article“Coming Out of the Fog”
Next article“Lives ‘Left in Ruin’ by Rising Tide of Depression Drugs”
Kermit Cole
Kermit Cole, MFT, founding editor of Mad in America, works in Santa Fe, New Mexico as a couples and family therapist. Inspired by Open Dialogue, he works as part of a team and consults with couples and families that have members identified as patients. His work in residential treatment — largely with severely traumatized and/or "psychotic" clients — led to an appreciation of the power and beauty of systemic philosophy and practice, as the alternative to the prevailing focus on individual pathology. A former film-maker, he has undergraduate and master's degrees in psychology from Harvard University, as well as an MFT degree from the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia. He is a doctoral candidate with the Taos Institute and the Free University of Brussels. You can reach him at [email protected]