Monday, February 18, 2019

Comments by Fr. John (Russell Grigaitis)

Showing 6 of 6 comments.

  • Jasenn Zaejian: When you say, “[your] comments address exactly what [I am] proclaiming,” are you referring to what I proclaim as a member of the Orthodox Faith or are you referring to what I have proclaimed in this article?

    If you are referring to what I proclaim as a member of the Orthodox Faith, there is no conflict with you describing it as an “attempt to rationalize the delusions or false beliefs and myths” of Orthodoxy. This article even mentioned that “[a]nyone in the private sector is free to disagree with Orthodoxy, even in the strongest of terms.” However, this article also says, “this is not the place for such discussions,” so I will not be engaging in such discussions.

    If you are referring to what was proclaimed in this article, would you like to present an argument why you believe it is a delusion, false belief, or myth that governments that legally protect freedom of thought, conscience, and religion or belief, as well as professions regulated by these governments, are legally unable to force their citizens to accept and submit to the beliefs of modern western psychiatry?

  • Jasenn Zaejian:

    I’m curious as to what you are referring to. Could you elaborate?

    This blog post simply points out that the beliefs of modern western psychiatry are incompatible with Orthodoxy and suggests that the beliefs of modern western psychiatry may also be incompatible with other beliefs, regardless of religious affiliation or lack thereof. Therefore, governments that legally protect freedom of thought, conscience, and religion or belief, as well as professions regulated by these governments, are legally unable to force their citizens to accept and submit to the beliefs of modern western psychiatry. Since this is the context of this blog post, your comments appears to be framed in a context other than this blog post, which is why further clarification is necessary to understand your comment.

  • The author of Orthodox Psychotherapy, Metropolitan Hierotheos, said elsewhere: “The incarnation of Christ was considered and was celebrated by the Fathers of the Church and the worshipping ecclesiastic community as the abolishing of religion and its transformation into a Church. In fact, the memorable father John Romanides had said in the most categorical way that Christ became human, in order to free us of the illness of religion.”

    https://www.scribd.com/document/350044716/The-Illness-of-Religion-Rev-Metropolitan-of-Nafpaktos-and-Saint-Vlasios-Hierotheos

  • Your explanation of how ECT works is a rather good summary and basically the same explanation that modern western psychiatrists used to acknowledge before 1970. Since that time, their stock answer has become: “We don’t know how it works, it just works.”

    A simple explanation of how ECT works was also implied in the above blog post:
    “Although it was the observed lessening of the psychic troubles of epileptics after having seizures that led to the development of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and other shock treatments, followed by the development of neuroleptics and newer classes of psychotropic drugs, this same response can be observed in survivors of traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Some TBI survivors who have also had major interpersonal and social traumas, often caused by becoming disabled, can objectively look at their situation and conclude that they should feel depressed, but can’t because of their acquired TBI.”

    This is not an endorsement of purposely giving a person a traumatic brain injuries via an electric current large enough to cause an injury so serious that a seizure is triggered with the intention of leaving the person too disabled to care about his or her psychic traumas.

    The most common description of ECT that I have personally heard from people who have had it is: “It’s like my soul being raped.” It is interesting that the word “soul,” rather than “psyche,” is always used in this description.

  • There are a few ideas for future articles like this one. These are three such ideas:
    * the reason there is so much overlap in terminology between Orthodoxy and modern western psychiatry and an explanation of what these words meant before modern western psychiatry began using them
    * a summary of how the Orthodox understand the human psyche, how to heal the broken psyche, and how modern western psychiatry frustrates this healing
    * an explanation of how ECT (electroconvulsive therapy) actually works from both the perspective of electrical theory and an Orthodox understanding of the psyche

    Is there some aspect of Orthodoxy (or electrical theory) that you would like to read about on Mad in America?

  • All of the comments are greatly appreciated. As stated, the objective was not to argue for or against any particular beliefs regrading the human psyche (which is just the Greek word ψυχή, commonly translated into English by a word of Germanic origins: soul), but to point out that these beliefs are protected by international and often national law. Perhaps all governments and government regulated professions bound by these laws should be held accountable to these law and not be allowed to promote and enforce only one particular belief regarding the human psyche, especially one that is statistically shown to be ineffective and harmful in the long run.