Friday, January 27, 2023

Tag: existential therapy

Can Psychotherapy Promote Liberation? Addressing Power Dynamics in Clinical Practice

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Just as it risks transmitting harmful narratives about pain and distress, psychotherapy might also subvert these very harms in pursuit of genuine healing and transformation.

Working With the Four Dialogues: Using Chairwork in Clinical Practice

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In 2001, I discovered the astonishing power and beauty of Gestalt Chairwork. Building on Perls’ and Moreno’s seminal work, I have developed a therapeutic model based on four orienting principles and four core dialogical stances.

Existential Therapy Assists Patients Withdrawing From Psychiatric Drugs

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Confronting existential anxiety through “Basal Exposure Therapy” shows promising results in people withdrawing from psychotropic drugs.

How to Die

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From The Atlantic: The existential psychotherapist Irvin Yalom, who has helped countless people grapple with their mortality and fear of death, is now coming to...

“How Unconscious Fear Of Death May Skew Your Judgment — In...

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WBUR covers a recent talk at the Boston Museum of Science by Sheldon Solomon,  co-author the new book, “The Worm At The Core: On...

“The Free Will of Ebenezer Scrooge”

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Philosopher Richard Kamber discusses what Dickens’ tale of Scrooge in A Christmas Carol can add to our discussions of free will in the present....

“How to Find Meaning in Suffering”

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In Scientific American, Kasley Killam presents insights from research on “post-traumatic growth,” highlighting the importance of finding meaning or underlying significance in our struggles and misery. “The psychiatrist and Holocaust survivor Viktor Frankl wrote extensively about this process after observing that his fellow inmates in concentration camps were more likely to survive the horrific conditions if they held on to a sense of meaning.”

“Jason Dias: Here’s The Real Reason Behind All These Shootings”

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Existential therapist and writer, Jason Dias, claims that there is something deeper and more pervasive than guns, drugs, or mental illness at the bottom of the United States’ mass shooting problem. On aNewDomain he writes: “We have to acknowledge that people who are despairing right now, they’re the sane ones, the normal ones. It makes sense to despair when you’re looked down on, tormented, bullied. When you feel different and you’re alienated. When your culture is alienated. When violence is glorified not by movies and games and television, but by the government, by the news. When violence is fetishized by political parties.”