Tuesday, January 31, 2023

Tag: veterans and mental health

The Persistent, Misdirected Search for Causes of Trauma-based Suffering

37
In the United States and other countries that have a military, there is often a great deal of talk about supporting veterans, but way too often, research aimed at learning what will be helpful is misguided and can even be harmful. The same applies to nonveterans who have been through traumatic experiences. Two new studies exemplify such wrongheaded approaches.

Prescribing an Epidemic: A Veteran’s Story

14
Had I known what I know now, I never would have taken any of these drugs, and I absolutely would not have taken a role in which my outreach efforts to get veterans into mental health treatment might place thousands of lives at risk.

Vets Who Receive Legal Aid Show Improved Mental Health

0
From Yale News: A new study shows that veterans who receive legal help with housing, benefits, and consumer or personal matters have increased income, fewer...

Using Shakespeare to Ease the Trauma of war

0
From The New York Times: Learning Shakespeare can be a valuable way for veterans to begin to understand and heal from the trauma of war. Article →­

“The Lobotomy Files: Forgotten Soldiers”

1
The Wall Street Journal published a large multimedia report on documents revealing a time when the US lobotomized some 2,000 veterans. “Besieged by psychologically...

Congress Proposes Research on the Link Between Psychiatric Drugs and Suicide

17
The meaning of veterans’ reactions to war is quite simple; they are trying to find a way to integrate the incredible horrors they’ve witnessed and to find a way to come back into a society that cannot possibly fully understand them. Drugging them into a stupor is not the answer. Congressman David Jolly (FL-13) has recently introduced the Veteran Suicide Prevention Act (H.R. 4640). The bill calls for the VA to study veteran suicides over the past five years and to determine what extent psychiatric drugs are implicated in those suicides. I encourage everyone to support Mr. Jolly’s bill by writing or calling your congressional representatives and encouraging them to cosponsor the bill.

“Veterans Let Slip the Masks of War: Can This Art Therapy...

1
“Service members suffering from PTSD often feel like they’re wearing a mask,” Samantha Allen writes in Invisible Wounds. Melissa Walker, an art therapist, asks them to make one. “The results are stirring. One mask, striped in red and black with hollow chrome-colored eyes, is wrapped in razor wire with a lock where its mouth should be.”