Adverse Childhood Events Contribute Significantly to Most Mental Health Problems

Kermit Cole
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John Read and Richard Bentall write in the British Journal of Psychiatry about the growing understanding and acceptance of the significant role adverse childhood events play in most mental health problems, and the theoretical, clinical and primary prevention implications of this profound shift. Their commentary provides perspective on two other articles in the same issue; on the impact of maternal depression on psychopathology, and of mistreatment in childhood on specific psychiatric disorders.
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Kermit Cole
Kermit Cole, MFT, founding editor of Mad in America, works in Santa Fe, New Mexico as a couples and family therapist. Inspired by Open Dialogue, he works as part of a team and consults with couples and families that have members identified as patients. His work in residential treatment — largely with severely traumatized and/or "psychotic" clients — led to an appreciation of the power and beauty of systemic philosophy and practice, as the alternative to the prevailing focus on individual pathology. A former film-maker, he has undergraduate and master's degrees in psychology from Harvard University, as well as an MFT degree from the Council for Relationships in Philadelphia. He is a doctoral candidate with the Taos Institute and the Free University of Brussels. You can reach him at [email protected]