“Breaking Up With My Meds”

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The New York Times has posted the first in what will be a series of articles by Diana Spechler about her efforts beginning in the fall of 2014 to quit the prescription medications she has been taking for anxiety, depression and insomnia.

“In Going Off, a series of Anxiety posts in the coming weeks, she will chronicle the challenges she faces from both the drugs and the withdrawal in her pursuit of a drug-free life,” states the Times.

Breaking Up With My Meds (New York Times, February 12, 2015)

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6 COMMENTS

  1. Yes, the comments ARE depressing. But also fascinating, and revealing. The whole chemical imbalance business appears in striking form, and is intensely defended. And clearly held by the majority of readers. There’s also a disturbing tendency to patronize the author and to cast her desire to quit the drugs as misguided, naive, or dangerous, after she’s very clearly described why she finds them difficult.

    In a nice coincidence there was a terrific editorial in the Times last weekend on “faceless” internet communication and how it opens the door for people to treat each other miserably.

  2. There was actually a diversity of opinions in the Comments section, as well as a few stories from survivors who got clear of the system. I added my two cents worth. I encourage others to do so as well. I thought the article did a great job of showing how dehumanizing it is to be viewed only through the lens of your “symptoms.” And the psychiatrist came right out and said, “Medication is all I have to offer.” It’s good for people to hear that is the case, as lots of folks go to psychiatrists thinking they’ll get therapy.

    Definitely worth the read.

    — Steve

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