Woman’s Serious Fall Leads to Bipolar Diagnosis, Mathematical Genius

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ABC News reports on a Colorado rancher who was initially diagnosed with bipolar disorder after a serious fall. However, doctors later determined that she had suffered a brain injury that had given her emotional blunting, synesthesia and high-level math skills.

Colorado Rancher Suffers Traumatic Brain Injury, Becomes Accidental Genius (ABC News, May 14, 2015)

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5 COMMENTS

  1. I had a serious fall, resulting in a “bad fix” on a broken bone. This led to a bunch of bad drug cocktails, and then a “bipolar” misdiagnosis. And I’m also someone who got in the top 99.95% on my math SATs and is an artist with a beautiful mind.

    Anyone think misdiagnosing all the brilliant female artists as bipolar, then torturing them with drugs, may not be in humanity’s best interest? Perhaps society should learn to respect the female mathematically minded artists more, and respect those men who do nothing but vote mental illnesses that have no scientific validity into existence less?

    Especially since the evidence does now seem to show the most common trait of all schizophrenics is psychiatrists misdiagnosing symptoms of child abuse or adverse childhood experiences as “psychosis.” Then likely creating both the negative and positive schizophrenia symptoms with their neuroleptics. Either via neuroleptic induced deficit syndrome or the central symptoms of neuroleptic induced anticholinergic intoxication syndrome, and perhaps possibly other syndromes.

    In other words, the seeming primary function of the schizophrenia label in our society today is turning child abuse victims (or women with concerns of child abuse) into schizophrenics with the “gold standard” treatment for that so called “real disease” … to cover up “zipper troubles” of men.

    A lawyer posted on MiA yesterday, and left a link to his views. He was quite insightful. He expressed an understanding of the flaws of the Federal Reserve banking system. He also pointed out that psychiatry was created as a specialty, just after the witch hunting ended in the country in which he lived. I haven’t done any research into this in other countries yet.

    Anyone know whether psychiatry just took over the paternalistic needs of the witch hunters of old in all countries? We know this was a problem with Freud. And it’s starting to look like this may be likely in regards to today’s schizophrenia label, at least according to the medical evidence. Albeit in a more private way than burning women and children. An ethical pastor did imply this to me, too.

    Perhaps it’s time to get rid of the paternalistic “dirty little secret of the two original educated professions,” now that we all live in the information age, and women are expected to work, rather than properly raise their children, and are supposed to be equal with men? And all men should learn to behave instead colluding, via unethical and unjust means, to cover up their “zipper troubles.”

    I’d love to know if anyone has looked into the correlation between when witch hunting ended in various countries, and when psychiatry was introduced.

  2. I wish the article had stated how she was misdiagnosed as having bipolar disorder after having a fall. SE, in reading your post, maybe she experienced something similar and was given meds for her condition and had a manic reaction that led to the false BP diagnosis. Frustrating that this information is lacking.