A Dreaded Part of Teachers’ Jobs: Restraining and Secluding Students

2
992

From NPR: “Earlier this year, an NPR investigation with WAMU and Oregon Public Broadcasting found deep problems in how school districts report restraint and seclusion. Following that investigation, NPR reached out to educators about their experiences with these practices …

Many [educators] told NPR that using restraint and seclusion is one of the worst parts of their job; they say these methods can be mentally and physically painful for both them and their students.

‘I would lock myself in the bathroom at work and cry, and I know that I wasn’t the only one,’ says D, who spent a year working as a teaching assistant at a private school for students with autism …

‘Even though I received the training for [restraint], I just never felt fully comfortable or prepared to do that,’ they tell NPR. They say restraint crossed a physical boundary that they weren’t comfortable with. ‘It just seems strange to be so imposing on somebody else’s body.’

Ben Travis, a social and emotional learning specialist in Fort Worth, Texas, says, ‘There’s a tension within me of knowing that if I am to restrain a student, then I’m essentially putting forth a situation that’s going to create trauma for that student.’

… A 2009 report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, a federal watchdog, found hundreds of cases of alleged abuse and even death when restraint and seclusion were used on school children.”

Article →­

Support MIA

MIA relies on the support of its readers to exist. Please consider a donation to help us provide news, essays, podcasts and continuing education courses that explore alternatives to the current paradigm of psychiatric care. Your tax-deductible donation will help build a community devoted to creating such change.

$
Select Payment Method
Personal Info

Credit Card Info
This is a secure SSL encrypted payment.

Billing Details

Donation Total: $20 One Time

2 COMMENTS

  1. Why is this happening?
    Are the kids who need restraining on psych drugs? Is that why they are pounding their heads onto a floor? If they are indeed on drugs, that might be why they need to be restrained.
    I never saw a kid needing to be restrained, ever.
    It is as if kids are rabid animals and are treated as such and no one is curious as to why and if this should be happening.
    Their drugs need to be thrown out. They are no more than toxic poisons. They cause anger, instability, mania, and many more symptoms and harm the kids for life.
    Restraining kids is an issue that needs to be taken seriously. Government has to know about the harm of drugs.

LEAVE A REPLY