“Helping Others Dampens the Effects of Everyday Stress”

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“The holiday season can be a very stressful time, so think about giving directions, asking someone if they need help, or holding that elevator door over the next month,” explains study author Emily Ansell of the Yale University School of Medicine. “It may end up helping you feel just a little bit better.”

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1 COMMENT

  1. I absolutely think doing kind things for others out, of the goodness of one’s own heart, increases one’s self esteem and level of self satisfaction. My psychologist told me to “quit activities and focus on the meds.” I thought that was the dumbest advice I’d ever heard, so ignored it. I actually added activities to my volunteer schedule instead, to the point I was volunteering 30-40 hours a week. And being such an active volunteer did make my psychiatrist’s disrespectful claims that I was “irrelevant to reality” and “w/o work, content, and talent” not just obscenely rude, but also a downright lie.

    I’m certain behaving with mutually respectful, productive cooperation with other human beings is a much more satisfying way in which to live, than defaming others with scientifically invalid mental illnesses, tranquilizing and poisoning others, and making up lies to destroy others’ lives and reputations.