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2 COMMENTS

  1. Person A: Have you met my friend, “mental illness”?

    Person B: Don’t care to actually.

    Person A: What’s the matter with you. Are you prejudiced?

    Person B: Not really, but you know people are often judged by the company they keep.

    Person A: You wouldn’t judge me in such a facile manner, would you?

    Person B: I’ve heard plenty of bad things about this “mental illness” character. I’d think you’d be better off without him.

    Person A: You are prejudiced, aren’t you?

    Person B: No, I’m just careful about the company I keep.

    Person A: Does that mean you can’t have anything to do with me.

    Person B: No. I don’t have a problem with you at all, but this “mental illness”, well, I wouldn’t have him hanging around here.

    Person A: You are prejudiced.

    Person B: Whatever. He’s not welcome.

  2. From the Hippocratic Oath:

    “I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.”

    Today’s psychiatrists depersonalize those they treat, and think of them as a “schizophrenic” or “bipolar” or a “depression caused by self.”

    This behavior was known to be immoral and wrong long, long ago.

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