Psychiatric Assessments Impacted by Gender, Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status, Study Finds

Clinician biases in psychiatric assessments lead to different treatment recommendations for people with identical symptoms.

1
1680

A new study published in the Scandinavian Journal of Psychology finds that gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status affect the outcome of psychiatric assessments in Sweden. According to the current research headed by Martin Wolgast of Lund University, male service users were seen as more dangerous and were less likely to be recommended for psychotherapy.

“Arab Swedish” service users were seen as more dangerous, were less likely to be recommended to psychotherapy, and were more likely to be reported to social services. Service users from lower socioeconomic backgrounds were less likely to be recommended for psychotherapy.

The authors write:

“The performed analyses identified several instances in which the clinicians’ assessments varied as a function of the social categories under investigation. For example, male patients and “Arab Swedish” patients were perceived as more dangerous, “Arab Swedish” patients, male patients, and patients with low socioeconomic status were less likely to be recommended psychotherapy, and “Arab Swedish” patients were more likely to be reported to social services. The effect sizes were generally small.”

You've landed on a MIA journalism article that is funded by MIA supporters. To read the full article, sign up as a MIA Supporter. All active donors get full access to all MIA content, and free passes to all Mad in America events.

Current MIA supporters can log in below.(If you can't afford to support MIA in this way, email us at [email protected] and we will provide you with access to all donor-supported content.)

Donate

1 COMMENT

  1. Psychiatry is “opinion & Hunch based medicine” and all that matters is how the Psychiatrist feels about the patient not really how the patient feels. Just look at criminal trials where Psychiatrists will give different diagnosis and determinations depending on who pays them.

    Report comment

LEAVE A REPLY