Thursday, February 2, 2023

Tag: mental health screening

Are Mental Health Screenings for Youth Worth the Risk?

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Researchers shed light on the limitations of mental health screening instruments for youth that are increasingly being used in schools and medical settings.

Should We Screen for Adverse Childhood Experiences?

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One author outlines the foundations of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) research, addressing its dimensions, limitations, and potential future directions.

Human Right to Health – More than Economic Justice

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Something is lost, a great deal is lost, when we give up an independent advocacy platform about our own bodies and subsume our needs and rights into what medical professionals are motivated to fight for on our behalf.

WSJ Hosts Debate on Depression Screening

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The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently issued a controversial recommendation that all adolescent and adult patients undergo depression screening in primary care. The...

“Missing in Action: Did US Journalists Miss a Huge Opportunity to...

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Last week, after the US Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) made a recommendation for increased mental health and depression screening “stories in the New York Times,...

Why Screening Everyone for Depression is a Terrible Idea

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Too many people have come to view themselves as defective and powerless to change their life situations, when this may not be the case. Conversely, individual treatment with drugs or psychotherapy may cause individuals to reframe their problems in terms of neurochemistry or thinking styles – internalizing a belief that they are the problem, when their problems exist in a wider sociopolitical milieu.

The Algorithmic Managing of ‘At-risk’ Children

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Part two of a Mad In America investigation into the expansion of psychological screening and electronic surveillance of children and youth. Experts point to mounting evidence that scientifically dubious mental health screening programs are just one part of an international governance shift towards creating all-pervasive surveillance systems for diagnosing 'pre-crime' and managing 'at-risk' children and youth. And not only is this not helping kids, critics argue, it’s demonstrably harming them.