Monday, May 21, 2018

In the News

Summaries of research findings that tell of a scientific need to "rethink psychiatry."

Increasing Antidepressant Dose Does Not Improve Outcomes

A systematic review of literature and meta-analysis indicates that there is no clinically or statistically significant effect of antidepressant dose increase after nonresponse to initial treatment.

Differing Depression Diagnostic Tools May Influence Research Findings

The type of diagnostic assessment used in research settings, either fully structured or semi-structured interview, may affect which participants in receive a diagnosis of major depression.

Study Explores Impact of Urban vs. Rural Upbringing on Stress Response

A new study investigates the relationships between early-home environmental factors and later-life physiological response to psychosocial stressors.

Pain Increases Later Risk for Anxiety and Depression

Experiencing moderate to severe pain, or having at least moderate life interference from pain, doubles risk for anxiety or depression.

Rethinking Madness and Medication: Researcher Discusses Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal and Survivor Movements

New understandings of medication and withdrawal experiences warrant rethinking conceptualizations of health and “madness."

Social Scientists Question Growing Neuro Discourse

Anthropologists analyze discourse surrounding anthropological engagement with the neurosciences in an editorial recently published in Medical Anthropology.

Yoga Improves Quality of Life for Elementary Students

A new study finds that a school-based yoga program improves third graders’ emotional and psychosocial quality of life.

Researchers Advocate for More Robust Informed Consent in Psychotherapy

Paper outlines recommendations for more thorough informed consent process in psychotherapy, which authors proclaim is an “ethical imperative."

Researchers Question “Gold Standard” Status of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Researchers argue for plurality and diversity among psychotherapy approaches and question the perceived superiority of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

Compelled Disclosure of Campus Sexual Assault May Be Harmful for Survivors

The majority of universities require most or all employees to report disclosures of sexual assault, but these policies may be ineffective at addressing campus sexual violence and disempowering for survivors

People Think Research is More Credible When It Includes “Extraneous” Brain Images

People show greater trust in studies with neuroscience language, graphs, and especially brain images.

New Meta-Analysis: Mindfulness Interventions Effective for Psychiatric Disorders

A meta-analysis of mindfulness-based interventions shows efficacy for treating depression, physical pain, smoking, and addictive disorders.

Social Support Improves Antipsychotic Discontinuation, Study Finds

A new study explores how people manage to discontinue antipsychotic medication and examines how social supports may improve outcomes.

Call for Client Inclusion in Recovery-Focused Psychiatric Diagnosis

A new review, published in The Lancet Psychiatry, examines the perspectives of clinicians and service-users on psychiatric diagnosis.

Antidepressant Use Leads to Worse Long Term Outcomes, Study Finds

Results from a 30-year prospective study demonstrated worse outcomes for people who took antidepressants, even after controlling for gender, education level, marriage, baseline severity, other affective disorders, suicidality, and family history of depression.

Researchers Explore the Relationship Between Religiosity and Psychotic Experiences

Individuals who identify as religious may be more likely to have symptoms associated with psychosis.

Primary Care Practitioners May Mistake Irritability as Bipolar Disorder in Youth

Family medicine and pediatric providers are less confident in their assessment of irritability in youth than psychiatric providers, which may lead to overdiagnosis of bipolar disorder.

Do Social Network Sites Help or Harm Well Being?

How does social network site use influence well-being? Researchers suggest this depends on the extent to which site use is “connection-promoting."

Effort to Tackle Overuse of Antipsychotics in Older Adults Backfires

A partnership designed to decrease antipsychotic use in elderly patients may have led to increased use of medications with even worse risk/benefit profiles.

Therapists Collaborate with Clients through Metatherapeutic Communication

Researchers develop an initial framework for understanding metatherapeutic communication practices that may inform future integration of collaboration in psychotherapy.

Philosophers Question the Separation of Medicine and Culture

Radically questioning the distinction between the objectivity of science and the subjectivity of culture can give way to powerful biocultural methods of healing.

How Victimization Affects Political Engagement in Adolescence

Study examines relationships between experiences of victimization, beliefs in government, and political participation among 12th grade students

Bright Light Therapy More Effective Than Medication Alone for Bipolar Depression

A new randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial has found bright light therapy to be a powerful intervention that could provide an alternative to medication for people with “bipolar depression.”

Parental Conflict Changes Emotion Recognition in Children, Study Finds

Study suggests interparental conflict causes lasting damage in the way children are able to recognize and process emotions.

Study Finds Connection Between Trauma and Psychosis in Children

Researchers connect the impact of early trauma to the development of psychosis in children as young as 7 years old.

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