Monday, February 6, 2023

Tag: open data

Multiple Researchers Examining the Same Data Find Very Different Results

5
A new study demonstrates how the choice of statistical techniques when examining data plays a large role in scientific outcomes.

Less Than Half of Clinical Trials Comply with Legislation to Accurately...

2
A new study finds that sponsors of clinical trials in the EU continue to fail at reporting their results as required by recent legislation.

High Rates of Questionable Research Practices Found in Ecology and Evolution

0
A new study, published online by the Open Science Foundation, suggests that questionable research practices (QRPs) are prevalent in the fields of ecology and evolution.

New Study Challenges Impartiality of Peer Review

0
New research shows that more connected and well-known researchers are more likely to be published, even when they receive negative reviews.

Failed TB Vaccine Exposes Concerns Regarding Research Ethics

0
An investigation exposes violations to research ethics, finding that researchers failed to disclose risks and even misled government agencies.

There’s No Such Thing As “Sound Science”

0
In this piece for FiveThirtyEight, Christie Aschwanden explains how various industries have used the language of the "open science" reform movement, which advocates for more transparency in scientific...

Brain Stimulation Research Lacking in Reproducibility and Scientific Integrity

2
Questionable research practices and poor reproducibility in electrical brain stimulation (EBS) studies.

Researchers Make Recommendations to Improve FDA Transparency

2
Organizations, advocates, scholars, and practitioners had a chance to give feedback regarding FDA processes.

“German Libraries Boycott Elsevier Demanding Open Access”

0
Germany's DEAL project, which includes over 60 major research institutions, has announced that all of its members are canceling their subscriptions to all of...

Pharma Data Sharing Efforts Off to a Slow Start

3
Researchers discuss the preliminary results of clinical trial data sharing efforts by pharmaceutical companies and other groups.

“Healthcare’s Dirty Little Secret: Results from many Clinical Trials are Unreliable”

0
For The Conversation, a team of researchers from the University of Aberdeen report that a substantial number of research trials produce unreliable results. “If that...

New Study Raises Doubts About fMRI Neuroimaging Research

5
More than forty thousand papers have been published using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology to explore the brain. A new analysis of the common...

“Many Clinical Trials’ Findings Never Get Published. Here’s Why That’s Bad”

0
STAT’s watchdogs, Ivan Oransky and Adam Marcus, explain why unpublished studies for drug makers and researchers “put young patients at risk, particularly if those...

“UK Tribunal Orders Disclosure of Clinical Trial Data”

1
“Many people with have been attempting to make sense of the seemingly bizarre claims made by the authors of the PACE Trial since...

NEJM Editorial Doubles Down on Resistance to Data Sharing

0
The New England Journal of Medicine came under fire earlier this year when editors wrote that new efforts for transparency and open data would...

“The Overdiagnosis of ADHD”

68
The general theme, that various "mental illnesses" are being "overdiagnosed" is gaining popularity in recent years among some psychiatrists, presumably in an effort to distance themselves from the trend of psychiatric-drugs-on-demand-for-every-conceivable-human-problem that has become an escalating and undeniable feature of American psychiatric practice. But the implicit assumptions – that there is a correct level of such labeling, and that the label has some valid ontological significance – are emphatically false.

“Big Science is Broken”

0
For The Week, Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry comments on the current state of Science: the replicability crisis, the failure to self-correct, outright fraud, the inadequacy of...

“Amid Public Feuds, A Venerated Medical Journal Finds Itself Under Attack”

0
The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has come under intense scrutiny for delayed corrections and controversial editorials and articles. “The Journal and its...

“How Open Data Can Improve Medicine”

0
“Those who possess the data control the story.” In the wake of the reanalysis of the infamous Study 329, where scientific data claiming the antidepressant Paxil was safe and effective for teens was egregiously manipulated, researchers are pushing for open access to raw data. “The issue here, scientists argue, is that without independent confirmation, it becomes too easy to manipulate data.”

“A Decade of Questions over a Paxil Study Vindicated”

0
Martha Rosenberg calls the reanalysis of Paxil and Study 329 “a victory for safety activists, medical reporters, the public and freedom of the press.” But, she warns, “many pro-pill doctors continue to fight evidence of Paxil’s suicide risks and similar SSRIs.”

Poor Evidence and Substantial Bias in Ritalin Studies

7
The authors of a large scale well-conducted systematic review of methylphenidate, also known as Ritalin, conclude that there is a lack of quality evidence for the drug’s effectiveness. Their research also revealed that Ritalin can cause sleep problems and decreased appetite in children.

Experts Call on Presidential Candidates to Improve Study Transparency

2
In an open letter to all US presidential candidates published Thursday in the BMJ, a group of global health care experts assert that current research regulations allow drug companies to publish incomplete and misleading results. They ask the candidates to declare whether they support improved transparency measures that would make data on drug studies publically available and open to scrutiny.

“How Too Much Medicine Can Kill You”

0
In an op-ed for the Guardian, cardiologist Aseem Malhotra writes: “Corporate greed and systematic political failure have brought healthcare to its knees. There are too many misinformed doctors and misinformed patients. It’s time for greater transparency and stronger accountability, so that doctors and nurses can provide the best quality care for the most important person in the consultation room – the patient.”

Study 329: By the Standards of the Time

19
The controversy over “Study 329” on the effects of Paxil in teen depression has raised questions about the state of ALL medical research. I decided to look at the research for the most recent psychiatric drug approved by the FDA, a new antipsychotic called cariprazine or Vraylar.  I located twenty studies of Vraylar on www.ClinicalTrials.gov, the U.S. government-sponsored registry for clinical trials.  Three were still in process, and seventeen were completed.  Not one had shared its results on the government website, a supposedly mandatory step.