Ecopsychology: How Immersion in Nature Benefits Your Health

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From Yale Environment 360: “How long does it take to get a dose of nature high enough to make people say they feel healthy and have a strong sense of well-being?

Precisely 120 minutes.

In a study of 20,000 people, a team led by Mathew White of the European Centre for Environment & Human Health at the University of Exeter, found that people who spent two hours a week in green spaces — local parks or other natural environments, either all at once or spaced over several visits — were substantially more likely to report good health and psychological well-being than those who don’t. Two hours was a hard boundary: The study, published last June, showed there were no benefits for people who didn’t meet that threshold…

The growing body of research — combined with an intuitive understanding that nature is vital and increased concerns about the exploding use of smart phones and other forms of technology — has led to tipping point at which health experts, researchers, and government officials are now proposing widespread changes aimed at bringing nature into people’s everyday lives.”

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4 COMMENTS

  1. Being in nature makes a person feel good, not exactly “news,” more like a statement of common sense. But this fact should be told to the psychiatrists, who have delusions that medically unnecessarily locking people up in hospitals, and not letting them even see daylight for weeks on end; will benefit those they’ve defamed, are neurotoxic poisoning, while attempting to gaslight them into believing they have one of the “invalid” DSM disorders.