Saturday, April 17, 2021

Blogs

Essays by a diverse group of writers, in the United States and abroad, engaged in rethinking psychiatry. (The directory of personal stories can be found here, and initiatives here).

Finding One’s Way Through Withdrawal

Prescribers are taught to prescribe psychiatric medication, but they are often not well-educated about the effects on patients of discontinuing these medications.

Looking Under the Lamppost: Confinements of the Prevailing Mental Health Paradigm

The mental health field's focus on the biomedical paradigm is like looking for your keys in only one spot, just because it's the most well-lit.

Insane Medicine, Chapter 7: Industrialised Psychotherapy Markets Western Folk Psychology (Part 2)

Contrasting the folk psychology brands of CBT and McMindfulness with empowering frameworks such as Open Dialogue and the Power Threat Meaning Framework.

The Professionalization of Mental Health Services Is Ruining Friendship

The emphasis on getting "professional" help allows people to abdicate responsibility to their real-life friends, rather than learning how to contribute meaningfully to relationships.

Appealing the FDA’s Denial of ECT’s Harms

More than 200 people signed an open letter to the FDA requesting electroconvulsive therapy’s safety studies and electrical dosing protocols.

Insane Medicine, Chapter 7: Industrialised Psychotherapy Markets Western Folk Psychology (Part 1)

Sami Timimi explores the common factors that influence therapy’s success, the evidence base for psychotherapy, and the over-promotion of CBT.

Out of the Bubble: Now or Never?

Never in human history did a powerful institution, no matter how harmful and corrupt, slide into self-inflicted irrelevancy. Institutions like the current psychiatric system can only be toppled by a powerful social movement.

Insane Medicine, Chapter 6: Neoliberalism and the Compare-and-Compete Society

Neoliberalism teaches people that suffering has nothing to do with the inequality they experience, but that it comes from their own individual failures of body and mind, and requires "experts" to identify and treat it.
illustration - holding up a sign that reads "no"

Stop Saying This, An Encore!

Continuing the series, we look at discussions of "chemical imbalances," medications, and diagnoses, as well as telling people to "calm down" and a further look at the "observer."
woman walking away, footprints in the sand

To the Young Person Who Doesn’t Identify with Their Disability Diagnosis Anymore

Your diagnosis should serve YOU. Not your parents, your doctors, your teachers, or the next door neighbor. We should be fighting for a future where the person being labeled has the ultimate say over how doctors and therapists view them.
doctor pointing finger

No, Jill Biden Should Not Be Called “Doctor”… But Only Because No One Should

Jill deserves all the defense she is receiving. However, this rush to defend Jill’s honorific usage is missing a much bigger and far more pervasive point: NO ONE should be called “Dr. Last-name.”
spilled pills with happy faces on them

Insane Medicine, Chapter 5: The Manufacture of Childhood Depression (Part 2)

The promotion of SSRI antidepressant use began with the pharmaceutical industry and occurs despite evidence that these drugs are harmful, not helpful, in children and adolescents.
Correnn Stormcrow-And I Drown-Flickr

Literally Indescribable: Are Antidepressants Addictive?

“My life was very, very good.” That’s how Michael sums up how things were for him—prior to his suffering from devastating withdrawal effects after discontinuing GlaxoSmithKline’s blockbuster drug Paxil.

Finding Meaning in Suffering: How Existentialism Can Help

Suffering is a universal human condition. But without making meaning of suffering, it can overwhelm us. Finding meaning in suffering might help to find the will to survive when life is difficult.

Insane Medicine, Chapter 5: The Manufacture of Childhood Depression (Part 1)

The medicalisation of our emotional lives has led to a horrific cultural shift in which we, and our children, have become alienated from and suspicious of our emotions, chipping away at our natural resilience.
blocks spell out "AUTISM"

No, Autism Is Not Over-Diagnosed

Autism is an umbrella diagnosis at this point. The broadness of the diagnosis doesn’t tend to be useful to clinicians. But it is very useful to the individuals who live with it.

Exploring Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal: A Town Hall Discussion Series

Our new discussion series aims to explore what we do and don’t know about safe withdrawal from antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and stimulants.

The Ups and Downs of Online Therapy

Now that the novelty has worn off and we are able to step back and analyze the situation, what does the switch to teletherapy portend for our profession?

New FDA Study Shows Benzodiazepines Can Cause Long-Term Injury

The FDA has finally acknowledged the adverse effects of benzodiazepines, the dangers of withdrawal, and that the current packaging does not sufficiently warn of these harms.
Road sign reading "ROUGH ROAD"

Insane Medicine, Chapter 4: The Manufacture of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) (Part 2)

No one has come near to finding a genetic basis or a characteristic neurological abnormality for autism, and as a result there is no biological marker or brain scan used to diagnose ASD.

Social Adversity, Mental Distress, and the Theatre of the Oppressed

The theatre of the oppressed directly challenges societal problems of oppression. Here the involved learn much from the enactment—concrete possible solutions and possible practices of resistance.

Dual Diagnosis Anonymous: Peer Support for Those Who Need It

What worked for participants is the compassionate, welcoming, inclusive and non-judgmental approach of DDA. It is about peer support, role modelling, hope, building skills… acquiring self-confidence and building a new identity.

Insane Medicine, Chapter 4: The Manufacture of Autism Spectrum Disorders (Part 1)

Because the “scientists” who study, categorise, and establish guidelines for autism can’t find anything definitive, they resort to scientism. Over time, it becomes part of our cultural “common sense.”

Does the NASW Code of Ethics Prohibit Peer Work?

An analysis of the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics’ regulations on dual relationships: Indications for self-disclosure and problematic consequences for peers entering the social work workforce.

Stop Saying This, Part 6: It Takes Two, Life’s Not Fair, and More

It’s common that both people are contributing to the issue in one way or another. However, there is at least one instance that renders “it takes two” unavailable for blanket-statement use, and that is abuse.

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