Wednesday, May 22, 2019

“ADHD Brains are the Most Creative”

In AlterNet, Scott Barry Kaufman reviews the evidence that people who've been diagnosed with ADHD often have higher than average levels of creativity. He...

How an Ancient Singing Tradition Helps People Cope With Trauma

From YES! Magazine: Lament singing, an ancient tradition once observed for spiritual purposes during funerals, weddings, and times of war, is now seeing a revival in...

A Mental Patient’s View of the Body

In 20 years of inpatient hospitalization, the psychiatrists that I encountered focused almost exclusively on treating my diseased mind and had no concept or interest in the body. While the wheels of “progress” turn slowly in mental health, I hope that along with ongoing advocacy there will be a focus on responsible health counseling and supporting people in healthier eating and living.

Reading Suggestions for Bibliotherapy

From Notes From a Typewriter: Bibliotherapy, i.e., the use of books in coping with emotional distress, can be a great source of comfort and support. "Reading is...

The Therapist who Saved my Life

In this creative nonfiction piece for Literary Hub, one woman shares her story of trauma, depression, and suicidality, and recounts the unconventional approach of the...

Why “Stabilizing” People is Entirely the Wrong Idea

If human beings were meant to be entirely stable entities, then “stabilizing” them would be an entirely good thing; a target for mental health treatment that all could agree on. But it’s way more complex than that: healthy humans are constantly moving and changing. They have a complex mix of stability and instability that is hard to pin down. All this relates to one of my favorite subjects, the intersection of creativity and madness.

Mad In America Film Festival In The News

Boston.com has published an article about the Mad In America Film Festival, running through this weekend in Medford, Massachusetts. "Making people rethink psychiatry —...

Hip Hop Therapy Psychiatrists Ask Media to Keep It Real

The Guardian and other media outlets ran articles about two psychiatrists promoting "the use of hip-hop as an aid to the treatment of mental...

Dickinson’s Legacy is Incomplete Without Discussing Trauma

In this piece for The Establishment, physician Isabel C. Legarda explores the possibility that the poet Emily Dickinson may have been a survivor of sexual violence. "Absent...

How Relational Therapy Enhances a Sense of Self and Relationships

Relational therapy can be informed by the intersubjective dynamics observed in early childhood to facilitate the development of healthy relational patterns and a strong sense of self.

“Veterans Let Slip the Masks of War: Can This Art Therapy Ease PTSD?”

“Service members suffering from PTSD often feel like they’re wearing a mask,” Samantha Allen writes in Invisible Wounds. Melissa Walker, an art therapist, asks them to make one. “The results are stirring. One mask, striped in red and black with hollow chrome-colored eyes, is wrapped in razor wire with a lock where its mouth should be.”

Twenty Years of Art at Bethlem Hospital

From BBC: At Bethlem Royal Hospital, a psychiatric hospital in London, patients are given the opportunity to work in the hospital's art studios as part...

“Let the Soul Dangle”: How Mind-Wandering Spurs Creativity

From Aeon: An emerging field of neuroscience has begun to reveal how contemplating art can lead to positive mind-wandering, psycho-biological self-regulation, and creativity. "Can art itself...

Using Paint, Pen on Paper or Song to Revisit Trauma

From The Conversation: The literary, visual, and performing arts can play an important role in helping people process trauma, especially for those who have difficulty...

“Can Madness Save the World?”

Writing for CounterPunch, Paris Williams writes that when an individual is experiencing what has been termed “psychosis,” it is important to recognize that this may also be the manifestation of a breakdown in their larger social groups, the family, society, and even the species.

Rap Embraces Schizophrenia and Owns It

Vanderbilt University psychiatrist Jonathan Metzl, author of The Protest Psychosis, has published a brief history of "schizophrenia" in relation to African American culture in...

Research Shows Art Courses Can Improve Mental Wellbeing

From PsyPost: A new study has found that a course of arts-on-prescription can provide a significant improvement in mental wellbeing, including in those with very...

Karen Pence Picks a Cause, and Art Therapists Feel Angst

From the New York Times: On Inauguration Day, Karen Pence announced her support for the mental health profession of art therapy. While many art therapists...

Colleges Get Proactive in Addressing Depression on Campus

From The New York Times: The number of college students with mental health concerns is rapidly increasing, straining many universities' mental health and counseling centers. Colleges...

“Making Theater Autism-Friendly”

-The Atlantic reports on the growth of "autism-friendly" movie theaters, sports arenas and now live theaters.

Researchers Identify 27 Categories of Emotion

A new study finds that emotions may be represented by 27 categories, with each category relating to others in a more complex and continuous fashion than previously understood.

“Some of gaming’s greatest heroes are mentally ill, and that’s a great thing”

In gaming magazine Polygon, Liana Kerzner reviews video games that weren't designed as "therapy," but include primary characters who are struggling with deep psychological...

Histories of Violence: Neurodiversity and the Policing of the Norm

In this interview for the Los Angeles Review of Books, cultural theorist and philosopher Erin Manning discusses neurodiversity, a movement that seeks to depathologize traits, experiences, and...

Hopeless But Not Broken: From George Carlin to Protest Music

From CounterPunch: Although people are often pathologized and shamed for feeling hopeless, hopelessness is sometimes a natural reaction to an oppressive political climate. George Carlin...

Asylum Magazine: Mad Studies Comes of R/Age, Part Two

A new issue of Asylum Magazine is available. This issue is the second in a two-part series highlighting new and original work on the theme...

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