Thursday, May 23, 2019
bipolar artist

The Bipolar Artist: A Lifelong Sentence to Bear

I was told that I had only two choices: Do not have children, or take lithium while I was pregnant—the drug that posed the least amount of birth defects, and the very medication that had killed the painter in me years ago. I refused both options and set out on my own, and luckily found a willing psychiatrist to help me taper off the meds.

Can Cultural Engagement Protect Against Depression?

A new study examines the preventative effects of cultural engagement has on depression among older adults.
envisioning psychiatric drug freedom

Envisioning Psychiatric Drug Freedom

Psychiatric meds can shut down the emotions and consciousness enough to make it possible to tolerate dynamics that would inspire rage or surges of empowered activity without the meds. It can be helpful to look closely at these blocks and start to create a map to freedom, understanding that it is a complex process that involves not only the physiology of the body of the individual taking meds, but the architecture of the social system around that person.

Philosophers Question the Separation of Medicine and Culture

Radically questioning the distinction between the objectivity of science and the subjectivity of culture can give way to powerful biocultural methods of healing.

Study Explores Māori Community’s Multifaceted Understanding of “Psychosis”

A new study explores how “psychosis” and “schizophrenia” are viewed within the Māori community in New Zealand.

How Relational Therapy Enhances a Sense of Self and Relationships

Relational therapy can be informed by the intersubjective dynamics observed in early childhood to facilitate the development of healthy relational patterns and a strong sense of self.

Study Finds Heavy Metal Music Beneficial to Mental Health

A new study highlights the role heavy metal music plays in the mental health of adolescents facing adversity.

New Traction for Art Therapy as a Treatment for Depression

New study investigates the acceptability of a phenomenologically informed, manual-based art therapy for clients diagnosed with moderate to severe depression.

Agency and Activism as Protective Factors for Children in the Gaza Strip

Researchers recommend a ‘politically-informed focus', including activism, when assessing children and designing interventions in areas of chronic political violence.

Researchers Identify 27 Categories of Emotion

A new study finds that emotions may be represented by 27 categories, with each category relating to others in a more complex and continuous fashion than previously understood.

Social Prescribing May Improve Self-Esteem and Mental Well-Being

Systematic review suggests social prescribing benefits individuals with mental and physical health issues, but more program evaluations are needed.

Arts Participation May Improve Mental Well-Being and Social Inclusion

Introductory arts courses at Open Arts Essex show improvements in mental well-being and social inclusion for individuals with mental health challenges.

Healing from Psychiatry: A Community Art Book

I began reaching out to other psychiatric survivors, asking whether they would like to have their art featured in a book, and the response I received was amazing. People openly shared not only their art but their personal stories, their feelings, and their painful journeys into, through, and out of psychiatry.

Psychodynamic Therapy Revealed to be as Efficacious as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Meta-analytic study finds that psychodynamic therapy outcomes are equivalent to those of CBT and other empirically supported treatments.

Music Therapy Interventions Reduce Depression Symptoms in Dementia

Therapists can use music to meet the emotional and social needs of individuals with dementia.

New Findings Suggest Masculinity is a Risk Factor for Suicidal Thinking

Men who report being self-reliant may be at greater risk of suicidal thinking.

Study Finds Music Therapy May Be Effective in Clinical Practice

In a new study published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Professor Sam Porter and co-authors, present the results of a music...

Dual-award Winning Play and Film About Human Beings, not Psychopathology

[M]y play, SHADES, and my film, "Is Anybody Listening?" are about people who have experienced major troubles, even trauma or other tragedies, who have dark secrets that torment them, but who use connection, love, humor, and creativity to come through, even to heal. And no one in the play or the film is pathologized.

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