Friday, May 24, 2019

Causation Theories

Children Taking ADHD Drugs More Likely to Take Antidepressants as Teens

Adhering to a commonly prescribed medication for ADHD in children is associated with higher chances of being prescribed antidepressants in adolescence.

Teacher Wellbeing Matters for Student Mental Health

Teacher’s personal wellbeing plays a role in students’ mental health outcomes, suggests a new study.

Exposure to Antidepressants in the Womb Linked to Autism

Researchers, publishing in Toxicology Research, review the evidence that antidepressant exposure in the womb is linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in humans.

Fighting for the Meaning of Madness: An Interview with Dr. John Read

Akansha Vaswani interviews Dr. John Read about the influences on his work and his research on madness, psychosis, and the mental health industry.

The Role of Intergenerational Trauma in the Perpetuation of Childhood Maltreatment

A new study examines the role parent borderline pathology plays in the perpetuation of childhood maltreatment.

Psychotropic Medications Serve as Powerful Tools for U.S. Military, Imperialism

Ethnographic research sheds light on extensive psychopharmaceutical use by soldiers in post 9/11 U.S. wars.

Psychosocially Oriented Psychologists Struggle Against the Medical Model

Interviews with psychosocially oriented psychologists demonstrate their experiences of discomfort with the hegemony of the medical model in their place of work and the conflicts that arise when they attempt to provide alternatives.

The Role of Racial Bias in the Overdiagnosis of Schizophrenia

Researchers detect disparity between white and African American patients diagnosed with schizophrenia when symptoms of a mood disorder are present.

Constructing Alternatives to the DSM: An Interview with Dr. Jonathan Raskin

Dr. Raskin discusses psychotherapists’ dissatisfaction with current psychiatric diagnostic systems and explores alternatives.
psychological injury model

Why the ‘Psychological Injury Model’ Will Ultimately Triumph

The Psychological Injury model will triumph, not just because literally thousands of studies show how trauma and stressful life events result in mental health problems, but because at our core, we know it is true. People hurt people, and people heal people. This cracks the intellectual foundation of psychopharmacology.

More Physical Activity-Based Mental Health Interventions Needed in Schools

What physical activity-based programs are being implemented in schools, how are they being researched, and what kind of impact have they made?

The Science and Pseudoscience of Women’s Mental Health: Conversation with Kelly Brogan

A conversation with Dr. Kelly Brogan, a leading voice in natural approaches to women’s mental health. With degrees from MIT and Weil Cornell Medical College, triple board certification in psychiatry, psychosomatic medicine and integrative holistic medicine, Dr. Brogan is uniquely qualified to challenge the pseudoscience of the chemical imbalance theory and the drug regimens that it spawned.

Mental Health Concerns Not “Brain Disorders,” Say Researchers

The latest issue of the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences features several prominent researchers arguing that mental health concerns are not “brain disorders.”

Exposure to Antidepressants in the Womb Linked to Autistic Behavior in Mice

Researchers experimenting on mice found that exposure to fluoxetine (Prozac) in utero resulted in behaviors considered in animal studies to be analogous to autism in humans.

The Power Threat Meaning Framework One Year On

The team that developed the Power Threat Meaning framework as a diagnostic alternative reflects on the response to the framework after one year.

The Trouble with Twin Studies

As most readers are aware, it is widely believed that both within and without of psychiatry genetic factors play an important role in causing major psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, ADHD, autism, anxiety, and even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Twin studies provide the main pillar of support for this belief which is often, though mistakenly, presented as a scientific fact.

No Brain Connectivity Differences Between Autism, ADHD, and “Typical Development”

Neuroscience researchers find no differences in brain connectivity between children with diagnoses of autism, ADHD, and those with no diagnoses.

It is Time to Abandon the Candidate-Gene Approach to Depression

The candidate-gene approach to depression goes unsupported and is likely based on bad science, new research finds.

Green Space in Childhood May Protect Against Adult Mental Health Issues

A new study suggests proximity to green space as a child is linked to lower rates of mental health issues in adulthood.

Stigmatizing Effects of the Psychosis-Risk Label

Study examines the effects on participants of being told they are at risk of developing psychosis.

Not So Rare But Rarely Diagnosed: From Demonic Possession to Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

Throughout the ages, convulsions, contortions of the body and face, including the tongue, super-human strength, catatonic periods, long periods of wakefulness or sleep, insensitivity to pain, speaking in tongues, and a predilection for self-injurious behaviours have all been offered as physical evidence of possession. The modern day interpretation, however, comes with a plot twist befitting a media spectacle. There is growing consensus in the medical community that many prior accounts of “demonic possession” may have represented original accounts of what is now broadly known as autoimmune encephalitis.

Study Reveals Inconsistency in ADHD Diagnostic Determinations

Researchers compare differences between research and clinical diagnoses of ADHD and explore the consistency of clinical determinations over time

Increasing Prevalence of Mood Disorders Among Teens and Young Adults

Depression, serious psychological distress, and suicide attempts have risen substantially since the early 2000s among young adults – what’s changed?

Researchers Fail to Replicate Evidence for “Biotypes” of Depression

A new study casts doubt on whether such biotypes for depression exist.

New Evidence for Brain-Gut Link in Depression and Quality of Life

The first ever population-level study of the brain-gut connection in humans finds evidence for a link between gut bacteria and mental health.

Follow Us

19,639FansLike
11,994FollowersFollow
2,915SubscribersSubscribe