Thursday, July 18, 2019

New Trial Finds Trauma-Focused Therapy Effective in Children

Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (Tf-CBT) is effective at reducing the symptoms associated with PTSD in children and adolescents, according to a new trial out...

Fluoxetine in Adolescence Raises Sensitivity to Stress in Adults

Research on neurochemicals associated with moods in mice and rats finds that, while less depression-like behavior was observed in those receiving fluoxetine (Prozac) administration...

Study Explores Professional Help-seeking Among Persons with Depression

A large review of studies finds that men, young and elderly adults, ethnic minorities, and individuals with lower education status are most at risk for not seeking help.

Brain Stimulation Research Lacking in Reproducibility and Scientific Integrity

Questionable research practices and poor reproducibility in electrical brain stimulation (EBS) studies.

Leah Harris: A Legacy of Psychiatric Diagnosis

MIA blogger and mental health advocate Leah Harris discusses growing up with parents diagnosed with schizophrenia, her personal experience with the psychiatric system, and psychiatric drugs.

Stigmatizing Effects of the Psychosis-Risk Label

Study examines the effects on participants of being told they are at risk of developing psychosis.

Exercise Effective for Early Psychosis, Studies Show

A new study out of the University of Manchester found that personalized exercise programs reduced the symptoms for young people suffering from their first episode of psychosis. Researchers also conducted an accompanying qualitative analysis and found that the participants experienced improved mental health, confidence, and a sense of achievement and felt that autonomy and social support were critical to their success.

“Why is Depression Incidence Increasing?”

-Was life better in the past, or is there some other reason depression is increasing?

“California Moves to Stop Misuse of Psychiatric Meds in Foster Care”

On Tuesday, NPR told the story of DeAngelo Cortijo. DeAngelo became a foster kid at age 3 after his mother attempted suicide. He was “diagnosed with bipolar and anxiety disorders, attachment disorder, intermittent explosive disorder or posttraumatic stress disorder,” and was prescribed “a combination of antipsychotics, antidepressants and stimulants, and was told that taking them was his only hope of being normal.” Through equine therapy, DeAngelo was eventually able to get off all of his medication. Now, California is hoping to pass reforms that would prevent foster kids, like DeAngelo, from being “prescribed antipsychotic drugs at double to quadruple the rate of that not in foster care.”

“Psychiatric Drug—Not Antibiotic—Messes with Gut Microbes, Spurs Obesity”

In a series of experiments in mice, researchers found that the drug risperidone alters gut microbes, which in turn profoundly influence metabolism, weight, and overall health.

Why Loneliness Affects so Many Young People

From Vice: The importance placed on self-sufficiency, extreme individualism, and competitive self-interest in our society has contributed to widespread loneliness among millennials. Article →­

Social Inclusion and Stipend Enhance Recovery, Study Suggests

A new study explores the benefits of a befriending program in the recovery of those with “enduring mental illness.”

In a Traumatised World, is Psychedelic Therapy our Best Hope?

From VolteFace Magazine: MDMA-assisted psychotherapy can play a major role in helping people heal from the effects of trauma. "The results really are incredible and I’ve had...

How Reliable is the DSM-5?

More than a year on from the release of DSM-5, a Medscape survey found that just under half of clinicians had switched to using the new manual. Most non-users cited practical reasons, typically explaining that the health care system where they work has not yet changed over to the DSM-5. Many, however, said that they had concerns about the reliability of the DSM, which at least partially accounted for their non-use. Throughout the controversies that surrounded the development and launch of the DSM-5 reliability has been a contested issue: the APA has insisted that the DSM-5 is very reliable, others have expressed doubts. Here I reconsider the issues: What is reliability? Does it matter? What did the DSM-5 field trials show?

WSJ Hosts Debate on Depression Screening

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recently issued a controversial recommendation that all adolescent and adult patients undergo depression screening in primary care. The...

#MeToo in Medicine: Women Harassed in Hospitals

From NBC: Although sexual harassment is widespread in the field of medicine, women face significant barriers to speaking out and reporting abuse. In light of...

Researchers Probe Connections Between Physical Activity and ‘Severe Mental Illness’

How does physical activity affect people diagnosed with bipolar, schizophrenia and major depressive disorders?

A Memoir of Chronic Fatigue Illustrates the Failures of Research

From The New Yorker: In her new book Through the Shadowlands, Julie Rehmeyer chronicles her struggles with chronic fatigue syndrome, or systemic exertion intolerance disease (S.E.I.D.),...

“Why So Many Smart People Aren’t Happy”

The Atlantic interviews Raj Raghunathan about his new book, If You’re So Smart, Why Aren’t You Happy? “If you were to go back to the...

Antidepressant to Blame for Frank Sinatra’s Failing Health

From Fox News: According to Frank Sinatra's manager Eliot Weisman, Sinatra suffered from several adverse effects of the antidepressant Elavil during his final years. "...there was...

How Loneliness Begets Loneliness

From The Atlantic: Loneliness is a serious health threat that is as dangerous as smoking. Social isolation often causes people to have difficulty reaching out...

The Link Between Opioids and Unemployment

From The Atlantic: A recent study found that increases in unemployment rates are associated with increased opioid overdoses and emergency room visits. Article →­

Spanking is Associated With Mental Illness

Canadian researchers, publishing today in the journal Pediatrics, find that physical punishment such as spanking is associated with an increased risk of mental disorders....

“Downstream Drugs: Big Pharma’s Big Water Woes”

Writing for GreenBiz, Elizabeth Grossman reports on research on the increasing amounts of pharmaceuticals making their way into the environment. “They report on opiods, amphetamines and other pharmaceuticals found in treated drinking water; antibiotics in groundwater capable of altering naturally occurring bacterial communities; and over-the-counter and prescription drugs found in water leeching from municipal landfills.”

The Virtues of Boredom

From The Atlantic: Like loneliness, boredom is an emotion that almost everyone feels, but almost no one talks about. Boredom may be useful in revealing...

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