Monday, July 13, 2020

Long-Term Social Supports Needed After Onset of Psychosis

New data on the effects of social support after early onset of psychosis suggests that patients with intense social support function better than those without such help, but than once supports are removed the effects diminish.

Researchers Identify Demographic, Ideological Factors Associated With Refugee Prejudice

A new analysis finds multiple antecedents of refugee prejudice, including religiousness, conservatism, and education.

“New Research Links Contact with Nature to Community Cohesion and Reduced Crime”

The Pacific Standard highlights new research out of the University of Cardiff that found the more green space there is in a neighborhood, the less crime. “The more a person felt connected to nature, the more they felt connected to others in their neighborhoods.”

Here’s Why I Wouldn’t Use the Mental Health System

In this piece for The Spinoff, Graham Panther, a consultant in Australia's mental health system, speaks to some of the shortcomings of mainstream mental health support....

Letters to the Editor: “The Treatment of Choice”

Readers respond to the New York Times article, “The Treatment of Choice,” about innovative programs for psychosis and schizophrenia that involve patients and their families in treatment decisions. “Narratives of success counter a drumbeat of faulty links of mental illness and violence, inaccuracies which serve only to further stigmatize and isolate individuals with psychiatric illness.”

Time Spent in Green Places Linked With Longer Life in Women

From Harvard Health Blog: A 2016 analysis found that women living in areas with higher levels of green vegetation had lower rates of mortality. Spending time...

Vail Place Focuses on Collective Work for Mental Health

Minn Post did a feature story last week on Vail Place, an alternative mental health treatment center run on a community “clubhouse” model where the nearly 900 members and staff work side by side to run the center’s activities. Vail Place was founded in Hopkins, Minnesota in the early eighties by mental health activists and family members as a community for psychosocial rehabilitation. “The work isn’t therapy,” a member explains. “It’s growth. It’s ‘I cans’ rather than ‘I can'ts.’ And that’s important for mental health and survival.”

Purpose is Inherently Divorced From Consensual Reality

Imagine being able to live harmoniously amongst others without fear. I cannot. Cannot imagine it even a little bit. What can be created for people in my camp? People who are sensitive and had so much trauma in childhood that life among others is highly stressful, scary and worrisome? I'm allowing myself sanctuary-time alone, quiet time, time to write… yet… will things ever be different? Will I ever find my niche in this world, where I feel safe and able, valued and worthwhile, loved, adored and comfortable? I have no idea.

Lancet: Let’s Stop Fighting, Assume the Best about Psychiatrists’ Intentions

If there is one downside to the field of mental health, declares an editorial in The Lancet Psychiatry, "it is the failure of pleasant,...

How Online Forums Offered ‘Lifeline’ for Sufferers

From The Times: In an age in which benzodiazepine dependence is increasingly becoming a global problem, online forums serve as a lifeline for numerous benzodiazepine...

Critical Psychologist On How Scientific Research Can Influence Public Policy

Critical participatory action research conducted on the higher education programs offered in prison leads to mobilized advocacy and shifts in public policy.

We Are The Ones

My public writing has brought my mother and I closer together than we’ve been in decades. There have been disagreements. But now, my almost ninety-year-old mother tells me she reads everything I write. She recently told me that she’s glad I see things so clearly.

“Helping Others Dampens the Effects of Everyday Stress”

"The holiday season can be a very stressful time, so think about giving directions, asking someone if they need help, or holding that elevator...

How an Ancient Singing Tradition Helps People Cope With Trauma

From YES! Magazine: Lament singing, an ancient tradition once observed for spiritual purposes during funerals, weddings, and times of war, is now seeing a revival in...

Benzodiazepines Co-operation Not Confrontation (BCNC)

BCNC is a website aimed at helping people reduce from benzodiazepines. It includes links, book reviews, support groups, and other information.

Videos from the 2014 “Transforming Mad Science and Re-Imagining Mental Health Care” ISEPP/UCLA Conference

The joint ISEPP/UCLA conference was held in Los Angeles on November 14-16, 2014. Today, ISEPP and the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs are delighted to bring you videos of 13 of the 15 invited plenary talks. Each video is accompanied by a crisply written interview with the speaker, focusing on the goals of their work, challenges facing their profession, and how they evaluate any salient changes in mental health practice and research. These smartly produced and edited videos range from 20 to 30 minutes in length and are freely available on www.TransformingMadScience.com

How to Die

From The Atlantic: The existential psychotherapist Irvin Yalom, who has helped countless people grapple with their mortality and fear of death, is now coming to...

How Victimization Affects Political Engagement in Adolescence

Study examines relationships between experiences of victimization, beliefs in government, and political participation among 12th grade students

Racial Discrimination Associated With Psychotic Symptoms

A study of 650 immigrant and racial & ethnic minority young adults in the United States finds that psychotic symptoms are significantly correlated with...

The Can Collector’s Club: Clarifying Where Mental Health Begins

In 1980, my father started the Can Collector’s Club (CCC). I was 2 years old. As the story goes, it was my mother’s brainchild, but dad quickly took ahold of the idea with his entrepreneurial spirit. Some people thought he had lost his mind. Some still do. But the purpose of the CCC was simple. Convince family and friends to turn aluminum cans into him so that he could use the money from recycling to support our college fund. And clean up the environment.

“Can Madness Save the World?”

Writing for CounterPunch, Paris Williams writes that when an individual is experiencing what has been termed “psychosis,” it is important to recognize that this may also be the manifestation of a breakdown in their larger social groups, the family, society, and even the species.

“Programs Expand Schizophrenic Patients’ Role in Their Own Care”

Benedict Carey at the New York Times covers the push for new programs that emphasize supportive services, therapy, school and work assistance, and family education, rather than simply drug treatment.

New Collaborative and Feedback-Informed Family Therapy Approach

Attempts to bridge the gap between research and practice result in a family therapy approach which employs clients as co-researchers.

Labels Initiates Core Social Support, Lose Peripheral Ties

Article Abstract: Although research supports the stigma and labeling perspective, empirical evidence also indicates that a social safety net remains intact for those with mental...

Let’s Talk About Mental Health: Brattleboro Community Television

Brattleboro, Vermont psychiatrist Nels Kloster and mental health counselor Robert Stack discuss the coming year in mental health, and the changing perceptions regarding mental...

Follow Us

19,639FansLike
11,994FollowersFollow
3,820SubscribersSubscribe