Friday, November 15, 2019

Large German Anti-Stigma Campaign Shows Little Effect on Attitudes

“Overall, this study showed that the information and awareness campaign had almost no significant effects on the general public's attitudes toward people affected by either schizophrenia or depression,” the researchers, led by German medical sociologist Anna Makowski, wrote. “One could assume that deeply rooted convictions cannot be modified by rather time-limited and general activities targeted at the public.”

Antidepressants Not Superior to Psychotherapy for Severe Depression

On Wednesday, JAMA Psychiatry released a meta-analysis comparing the results of cognitive-behavioral therapy and antidepressant medication in severely depressed populations. Currently, many practice guidelines suggest that antidepressants be used over psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. The analysis, however, found that “patients with more severe depression were no more likely to require medications to improve than patients with less severe depression.”

The People with Psychosis Embracing the Voices They Hear

In this piece for Vice, Laetitia Laubscher discusses the Hearing Voices Network, a non-medical approach to hearing voices and experiencing extreme states. "...a key goal...

What Does Social Justice Really Mean for Psychologists?

Without clarity and consensus around what social justice means, psychologists risk perpetuating injustices that undermine their stated mission.

Western ‘Depression’ is Not Universal

Derek Summerfield, consultant psychiatrist at South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust, challenges the assumption that Western depression is a universal condition.

The Shamanic View of Mental Illness

From UPLIFT: In the shamanic view, emotional distress and psychosis signal a spiritual awakening or emergence, not a pathology. Western cultures can learn a great...

Book Review: Psychiatry Reconsidered

Hugh Middleton, MD, Associate Professor at the School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Nottingham, and NHS Consultant Psychiatrist, Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust has written an interesting and worthwhile book, “Psychiatry Reconsidered, From Medical Treatment to Supportive Understanding.” Dr. Middleton is co-founder of the Critical Psychiatry Network and this book could serve as the foundational textbook for our field. As his academic appointment would suggest, he has a decidedly social perspective on the kinds of problems that bring many people to a psychiatrist’s attention, but in this book he offers eloquent discussions of many perspectives that inform our field. It is remarkable that in this 200 page text, he is able to cover so many topics – diagnosis, pharmacotherapy, schools of psychotherapy - with such clarity.

Where Critical Psychiatry Meets Community Resilience

The International Society for Ethical Psychology and Psychiatry had the clout to draw a stellar line-up of presenters to its recent conference, including internationally prominent critics like David Healy, Peter Gøtzsche, Robert Whitaker and Allen Frances. There were lots of learnings and even some tense discussions, but one of the most intriguing aspects of the entire conference was the way in which scientific and social issues became deeply intertwined, especially when presenters reached for better pathways forward.

New Book Deconstructs Ideology of Cognitive Therapy

CBT forwards a hyper-rational perspective of human suffering that complements a managerialist culture of efficiency and institutionalization in the Western world.

Backsliding in the Bay State

The drumbeat for more "Risk Management" just gets louder. And nowhere is this so alarmingly evident as a new policy proposed by the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH) in November 2012.

Lack of Face-to-Face Contact Doubles Depression Risk for Older Adults

New research suggests that more frequent in-person contact lessens the risk of depression in older adults. The study, published in this month’s issue of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, found that in Americans over fifty the more face-to-face contact they had with children, family and friends, the less likely they were to develop depressive symptoms.

Yoga Improves Quality of Life for Elementary Students

A new study finds that a school-based yoga program improves third graders’ emotional and psychosocial quality of life.
love

Are Emotional Disorders Really Disorders of Love?

Could the whole array of psychiatric diagnostic categories, to the extent that they have any validity at all, be expressions of the failure to love and to accept love? Do successful psychotherapies really work by means of the therapist’s ability to encourage people to experience love through how positively he or she relates to them?

How Do We Prevent Loneliness?

Loneliness has been linked to negative health outcomes, but there are no interventions clearly proven to ‘fix’ the problem.

Histories of Violence: Neurodiversity and the Policing of the Norm

In this interview for the Los Angeles Review of Books, cultural theorist and philosopher Erin Manning discusses neurodiversity, a movement that seeks to depathologize traits, experiences, and...

Your Anxiety is a Political Issue

From Extra Newsfeed: Anxiety is a political issue, resulting directly from marginalization and structural inequality. The solution to anxiety is not self-help culture but activism...

More Evidence for the Lasting Psychological Impact of Lead Exposure in Childhood

New research points to numerous harmful effects of high-level lead exposure in childhood on adult mental health and personality characteristics.

Training Nursing Home Staff in Understanding Needs Can Reduce Antipsychotic Use

A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, the largest study of its kind, has shown it is possible to reduce the use of antipsychotics in nursing homes, by engaging their staff in a training program designed to target residents’ strengths and their unmet needs.

Peer Support Reduces Chances of Psychiatric Readmission

A randomized control trial finds that receiving peer support from individuals with similar lived experiences reduces one’s risk of readmission to an acute crisis unit.

The Effects of Practicing Psychotherapy on Therapists’ Personal Lives

A new study, published in Psychotherapy Research, explores how having a career in psychotherapy affects therapists’ personal lives.

Research Finds Parents’ Trauma May Impact Children’s Health

Study uncovers some of the intergenerational consequences of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).

Increasing Prevalence of Mood Disorders Among Teens and Young Adults

Depression, serious psychological distress, and suicide attempts have risen substantially since the early 2000s among young adults – what’s changed?

People Age Better if They Have a Purpose in Life

From TIME: Living purposefully may help people maintain their physical function and independence as they age. According to a new study, older adults with a...

Laura Delano, David Oaks, Ted Chabasinski and Adina Lambert in Philadelpha

Laura Delano at Occupy the American Psychiatric Association, May 5, 2012, in Philadelphia David Oaks at Occupy the American Psychiatric Association, May 5, 2012 Ted Chabasinski...

Neoliberalism Drives Increase in Perfectionism Among College Students

Meta-analytic study detects upsurge in patterns of perfectionism in young adults and explores how neoliberalism contributes to this trend.

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