“Medicating a Prophet”

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In the New York Times Sunday Review, Irene Hurford, a psychiatrist, reflects on the ethics of forced treatment for psychosis. “As doctors,” she writes, “we expect those with psychosis to realize that their reality is false, and to agree that they need treatment. Perhaps unsurprisingly, they often don’t, exhibiting what we refer to as ‘lack of insight.’ If, however, lack of insight is defined as a failure to accept an alternative view of reality, then do the rest of us lack insight, too?”

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9 COMMENTS

  1. “If, however, lack of insight is defined as a failure to accept an alternative view of reality, then do the rest of us lack insight, too?””

    I don’t know who the “us” is, but I am not one of the us. I do not believe psychiatric drugs are in fact medicine.
    The drugs are not medicine because there is nothing physically wrong with the brain of the “Prophet”.

    How long does a “psychosis” really last? People get upset at being in jail the jailers call a hospital. The violence that usually occurs ( of who is if fact in Power) makes the jailers drug the Prophet. They used to use the obvious restrains of chains and straitjackets, but that was too ugly for the general public.

    The general public is happy to see the drugged mental patient ( preferably drugged for life for the mentally ill can not be forgiven), but angry that the taxes they pay go towards the process.

    • In the case of “Mark”.
      “He was nearly mute and rail-thin. But he still refused medication.” says article
      The doctor could have forced a hospitalization on the basis of the physical weight of the patient. Physical proof the person is not taking care of themselves, an unsound mind.

      This complaint would have to be told to him and written down on paper as your complaint.
      Something he can deny or accept in court.

      Why go to court? You would say. Why bother? Without the court process reality is not real.

      Once in the prison perhaps the prisoner would change their behaviour in some way, perhaps a negotiation would then take place.
      The immediate jump to drugs/medications is unfounded, and probably based on MONEY.
      It takes time for some one to come to their senses ( proper food, sleep , cleanliness etc) , and you Doctor want them cured NOW, just like a real doctor who fixes physical illness.

  2. “If, however, lack of insight is defined as a failure to accept an alternative view of reality, then do the rest of us lack insight, too?” This psychiatrist / author, in my opinion, does “lack insight,” since the DSM “bible” he believes in is neither scientifically valid, nor reliable, according to Dr. Thomas Insel. And he also “lacks insight” into the reality that the antipsychotic drugs are “torture” drugs, according to the UN, that by the way can create a real “psychosis,” via anticholinergic toxidrome poisoning. And obviously he “lacks insight” in to the fact that in the USA people have a legal right to believe in the Triune God, which includes God and Jesus, which is obviously not something this psychiatrist believes in thus, such belief is “an alternative view of reality” to this psychiatrist. And apparently this psychiatrist “lacks insight” into the reality that it is, I believe still, illegal to defame and torture Christians in the USA for their religious beliefs.

    • He may also lack insight into the fact that he is a controlling SOB who is only interested in professional prestige and the money he makes selling drugs, locking up folks, and frying their brains.

      He enjoys his delusion that he’s a benevolent humanitarian worthy of being canonized for hurting those sub humans he works with. It’s all for their own good.

      They won’t worship him; he knows he’s God. Therefore they must be psychotic!

  3. “If, however, lack of insight is defined as a failure to accept an alternative view of reality, then do the rest of us lack insight, too?”

    I would call that closed-minded, arrogant, defeatist, and cynical, for starters. It’s also delusional. There are sooooo many perspectives and perceptions of reality. Narrowing it down to one is, well, narrow! And extremely limiting and oppressive. To the nth degree. Humanity is comprised of diverse realities, how could it be any other way?

    The problem is when diverse realities are in competition with each other, and one culture wants to do harm to an antithetical culture. That’s when the threat of annihilation comes to light, and people start to invalidate the reality of others. Which, really, is an exercise in futility, because our personal reality cannot be controlled by others, rightfully speaking.

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