Friday, June 5, 2020

Childhood Adversity/Trauma

Childhood Bullying Linked to Psychosis

Research from the U.K. shows that involvement in bullying between the ages of 8 and 11, whether as victim or perpetrator, is linked to...

“Loneliness May Warp Our Genes, And Our Immune Systems”

NPR reports how loneliness can change our bodies and affect our physical and mental health. "There are things we can do to get out of a depressed or lonely state, but they're not easy," they report. "Part of the reason is because these negative psychological states develop some kind of molecular momentum."

“The Myth of the Ever-More-Fragile College Student”

“The point, overall, is that given the dizzying array of possible factors at work here, it’s much too pat a story to say that kids are getting more 'fragile' as a result of some cultural bugaboo,” Jesse Singal writes in response to the flurry of recent think pieces decrying the weakened resolve of today's college students.

Psychiatric Teams Have a Responsibility to Think About the Psychosis/Sexual Abuse Link

In England, childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has become big news. The increasing understanding of the level of childhood sexual abuse and how this produces mental anguish has of course reached the psychosis arena, and encouraged academic study. Whilst the majority of psychiatrists continue to privilege a biological explanation of psychosis, more and more workers recognise abuse as at least a trigger if not a cause of psychosis. It's important to develop thinking points for teams struggling with, or more generally avoiding, the CSA/psychosis link.

Trauma and Schizophrenia: The Ultimate Political Battle

This weekend I attended an international trauma studies conference in Miami, Florida, where some of the leading researchers and clinicians in the field of trauma gathered to share their innovative projects and findings. Although there were many worthwhile moments, overall I left feeling paradoxically hopeful, saddened, inspired, and a bit dumbfounded. One study after another was presented on "trauma-related disorders" and their associated treatments, yet there was not a single mention of schizophrenia or its related diagnoses. Four days of trauma discussion and the topic of psychosis was nowhere to be found.

Study Examines Women’s Experiences of Hearing Voices

An international group of researchers from multiple disciplines has published a historical, qualitative, and quantitative investigation into voice-hearing in women. The interdisciplinary project, freely available from Frontiers in Psychiatry, explores how sexism, exploitation, and oppression bear on women’s’ experiences of hearing voices.

Bipolar Disorder: Childhood Trauma Modulates Impact

From Psychiatry Advisor: Childhood trauma modulates the effects of bipolar disorder on the amygdala and hippocampus; it is associated with increased volumes of gray matter. "'Childhood maltreatment has...

Social Prescribing May Improve Self-Esteem and Mental Well-Being

Systematic review suggests social prescribing benefits individuals with mental and physical health issues, but more program evaluations are needed.

New Report Points to Gaps in the Evidence for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

A new report on pediatric bipolar critically examines the current evidence base and calls for more research before the diagnosis is used.

Alternative Therapies for Adolescent Depression as Effective as CBT, Study Finds

Brief psychodynamic and psychosocial interventions help maintain reduced depressive symptoms

Study Finds Increasing Minimum Wage can Decrease Child Maltreatment

Increasing the minimum wage - even modestly - can lead to less cases of child abuse in the home.

Western ‘Depression’ is Not Universal

Derek Summerfield, consultant psychiatrist at South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust, challenges the assumption that Western depression is a universal condition.

“Young Americans Have Been Getting More Anxious and Depressed, Why?”

According to Jesse Singal, “ever since the 1930s, young people in America have reported feeling increasingly anxious and depressed. And no one knows exactly...

Interpersonal Therapy May Prevent Postpartum Depression

Interpersonal therapy reduces the risk of postpartum depression in mothers on public assistance during first 6 months after giving birth.

Applied Psychoanalytic Theory in School Settings

In this episode of the Psychoanalytic Voices podcast, Dr. William Sharp discusses his work introducing psychoanalytic techniques into school-based settings.

Multisystemic Therapy No More Effective than Standard Care for Antisocial Behavior

Study counters previous evidence supporting multisystemic therapy, finding adolescents are just as likely to have out-of-home placements when receiving multisystemic therapy versus management as usual.

“Curing Naughty Children With Drugs”

Dr. Max Pemberton “The Mind Doctor” weighs in on the Cochrane review which questioned the evidence for Ritalin for ADHD. He writes: “History is...

International Study Examines Environmental Factors Associated with Psychosis

Study finds the incidence of “psychosis” to vary by person and place, corresponding to factors such as race, ethnicity, age, and environment.

Self-Differentiation and Why it Matters in Relationships

From GoodTherapy.org: Research shows the tremendous impact we each have on one another's emotional and psychological health; our emotions, especially those that are negative, are...

“Addressing Trauma as a Health Risk”

Edward Machtinger, MD, director of UCSF's Women's HIV Program, nearly 84 percent of patients with HIV/AIDS died from trauma, such as physical abuse, neglect, substance...

Intimate Partner Violence Doubles Risk for Postnatal Depression in Malaysian Women

Women in Malaysia exposed to intimate partner violence are twice as likely to experience postnatal depression.

You’re Not Imagining It: Empathy Hurts

From WBUR: National tragedies such as the recent school shooting in Parkland, Florida can be traumatic even for those who were not directly affected. It is...

Mental Health Professionals and Patients Often Disagree on Causes of Symptoms

A new study finds that clinicians’ disregard for mental health patients’ insight into their own condition may be detrimental to treatment.

Links Between Benefits and Mental Ill-Health Could be Recorded

From Vox Political: In a new proposal in the medical journal The Lancet, Kate Allsopp and Peter Kinderman have called for mental health professionals to record psychosocial...

Introducing the Power Threat Meaning Framework

From The British Psychological Society: A group of senior psychologists and prominent service user campaigners has published a report offering an alternative framework to understand emotional distress. "The Framework...

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