The APA’s New Image

Philip Hickey, PhD
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On April 25, 2014, Jeffrey Lieberman, MD, then-President of the APA, announced that the association had engaged the services of Porter Novelli, a prestigious PR company based in Washington DC and currently operating in 60 different countries.

“Mindful of the continuing stigma associated with mental illness and psychiatric treatment, we retained an outside consultant agency (Porter Novelli) to review APA’s communications capabilities, needs, and opportunities. Based on its report, we are now moving forward with an initiative to enact a sophisticated and proactive communications plan that will be directed both internally to APA members and externally to the media, mental health stakeholder groups, and the general public.”

I expressed the belief at the time that it would take a lot more than some PR embellishments to remediate the fundamental flaws in American psychiatry’s concepts and practices.  Here is what I wrote:

“And that is what it’s all about.  Psychiatry remains blind to the fact that it is its own spurious pathologizing of its clients that creates the stigma.  It has no interest in genuine reform, but instead is embarked on a tawdry PR campaign to whitewash its transgressions and sell its concepts to the media, stakeholders, and the general public.  Dr. Lieberman even acknowledges the APA’s need to sell this bill of goods to its own members!

And apparently nobody at APA headquarters can see how inherently insulting this is.  Nobody can see that treating people as marks, whose thoughts and beliefs are to be manipulated by a professional PR company, is no way to treat people.  But psychiatry has been treating human beings as non-people for decades.”

In the intervening year and a half, I’ve been watching the APA closely for any indications of fundamental change; any hint of critical self-appraisal; any suggestion of genuine reform or remediation.

But I’ve seen nothing of this sort.  It’s still the same old APA, with its same old spurious diagnoses, and the same old assurances that their “treatments” are efficacious and safe, and that the great neurological insights are just around the corner.

For instance, Paul Summergrad’s final address as president, at this year’s annual meeting, contained the following:

“[W]e are in the midst of a profound transformation of our understanding of neuroscience, genetics, and epigenetics,” Summergrad said. “That we have not yet achieved interventions based on these insights or diagnostic tests is not because we will not achieve them, but because of the complexity of what we are studying.”

Psychiatrists are  “…in the midst of a profound transformation…”

But I’ve seen not one shred of substantive reform: no formal repudiation of the chemical imbalance hoax; no apologies for perpetrating this hoax; and no reduction in the enthusiasm for medicalization, high voltage electric shocks to the brain, and drugs.  In short, there’s been nothing to suggest that the APA has subjected itself, or its concepts, to any kind of serious scrutiny.

But I’ve recently discovered I was looking for the wrong things.

I went to Porter Novelli’s website, and found an interesting document.  I’m not sure what to call it, but it’s a “look-at-the-great-things-we’ve-done-for-the-APA” kind of document.  It’s in a section called “Jack’s Garage”, which is described as “Porter Novelli’s global creative group”.  Apparently, if a company or association goes to Porter Novelli and asks for help with their image, Porter Novelli sends them to Jack’s Garage.  Why it’s called Jack’s Garage, I can’t begin to imagine.  Perhaps to convey the impression that they fix things?

Then, there’s a document titled:  American Psychiatric Association: Rebranding to move the field forward.  Rebranding, according to Oxford Dictionaries online, means:  to “change the corporate image of (a company or organization)”.   In this document, there’s a sub-heading called “The Ask”, which I gather means what the client organization asked Jack’s Garage to do:

“The national association for psychiatrists was seen as the knowledgeable literary leader, a resource for published research and advances in the field, but the membership wanted a true leader that could advance the field, which still suffers from old stigmas and lack of understanding of the true science behind psychiatry.”

So, apparently, the APA told Jack or someone in his garage, that they (the APA) were seen as “…the knowledgeable literary leader, a resource for published research and advances in the field…”, but that the members wanted them to be “…a true leader that could advance the field.”

This isn’t entirely clear, but the gist seems to be that the APA wanted to change their image from a kind of back-room research repository to one of active leadership.

And the problems facing psychiatry are identified as:

  • Old stigmas
  • Lack of understanding of the true science behind psychiatry

This has been standard fare from psychiatry for the past twenty years or so; not only here in the US, but also in Europe.  (See the February 27, 2015 European Psychiatric Association’s EPA guidance on how to improve the image of psychiatry and of the psychiatrist).

In fact, the problems facing psychiatry are that they have irreversibly committed themselves to the patently spurious notion that all significant problems of thinking, feeling, and/or behaving are illnesses, and that these “illnesses” need to be “diagnosed” by experts (specifically, themselves), and are best “treated” by neurotoxic drugs and high-voltage electric shocks to the brain.  It is because of this that psychiatry is the only medical specialty that has an anti group.  And it is because of this, and its consequent destructiveness and disempowerment, that psychiatry is widely and accurately perceived in a negative light.

With regards to the “lack of understanding of the true science behind psychiatry,” it needs to be pointed out that there is no true science behind psychiatry.  What’s behind psychiatry is a massive pharma-funded hoax masquerading as science, and leaving in its wake a shameful trail of human destruction and disempowerment.

But that is a problem way beyond the reach of any PR firm, even one as prestigious as Porter Novelli.

Nevertheless, the APA went to PR and told them that they needed to change their image, and here’s Porter Novelli’s synopsis of their response:

“The Answer:

Repositioning American Psychiatric Association from wise sage to caring ruler, we changed everything from messaging to their logo to support the new brand persona. APA also suffered from poor brand awareness, with many divisions within the organization using their own branding that did not ladder up to a central visual or verbal tone. We worked with the organization and each division to identify the best architecture that would strengthen the central brand while still allowing for flexibility within a successful framework.”

So, Porter Novelli “repositioned” the APA from “wise sage” (I kid you not), to “caring ruler.”  And to accomplish this, they changed “everything,” from “messaging” to their logo.  I assume that messaging means communicating one’s message.  Psychiatry’s message is that all significant problems of thinking, feeling, and/or behaving are brain illnesses that need to be “treated” with high voltage electric shocks to the brain or with neurotoxic drugs.  Presumably Porter Novelli has improved the APA’s delivery of this message.  This is interesting, because I certainly haven’t noticed any changes in the way American psychiatry delivers this message.  It’s still the same tired old unsubstantiated assertions, trotted out at every opportunity, coupled with systematic dismissal and marginalization of anyone who challenges these assumptions.  And, of course, the need for “early intervention,” and endless lamentation of the “fact” that vast numbers of “mentally ill” people are not receiving “treatment”!

Anyway, according to Porter Novelli, the APA suffered from “poor brand awareness.”  I’m not sure what this means, but as best as I can figure from the document in hand, it refers to the APA’s use of their logo, or — more correctly — logos, plural.  You see; prior to Porter Novelli’s intervention, the APA had six different logos.  Yes, six!

They had:

  • The familiar bust of Benjamin Rush, the founder of American psychiatry;
  • A stylized rod of Asclepius flanked by the words American Psychiatric Association and underpinned with the slogan “Healthy Minds, Healthy Lives”;
  • A rather nondescript logo for their foundation (APF);
  • A logo for their publishing group;
  • A red, white, and blue logo for their Political Action Committee;
  • And a logo for their annual meetings.

And all of this chaos and confusion is now gone – swept away by the tireless mechanics at Jack’s Garage.  Now the APA has only one logo: a stylized rod of Asclepius in white, superimposed on (guess what?) a blue brain viewed from above.  The words American Psychiatric Association appear to the left of the brain.  The various divisions of the association use the brain logo with the appropriate wording (Foundation; Publishing; PAC; Annual Meeting) underneath.

But one picture is worth a thousand words.  If you go here, and click through the images, you can find a pictorial summary of how Porter Novelli transformed the APA’s “confusion” into “strength.”

. . . . .

So, as often happens to me when I’m writing about psychiatry, I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.  It is clear from Dr. Lieberman’s remarks, quoted earlier, that the decision to engage the services of Porter Novelli was based on the fact that psychiatry is widely perceived in negative terms.  It is also the case – though I don’t think Dr. Lieberman would ever concede this – that the negative perceptions are accurate and justly deserved.

The notion that one can even begin to address these issues by tinkering around with the association’s logo borders on the bizarre.  But perhaps it’s not all that surprising.  After all, psychiatry is the profession that purports to ameliorate the most profound feelings of despondency, fear, anger, loneliness, and unfulfillment by tinkering with people’s brains!

But maybe I’m being too shallow.  Perhaps there’s some profound but arcane message in the logo:  “We’ll clean the snakes out of your brain!”  Or, “Snake oil for the brain.”  Or maybe it’s meant to be a plumber’s snake:  “We’ll clean the s… out of your brain!”  Or perhaps the reference is to venom: “We can poison your brain!”  Or snake-charming: “We can charm your brain snakes.”

And to guard against any misunderstanding, this article is not a criticism of Porter Novelli, who presumably delivered what was asked of them.  This is a criticism of organized American psychiatry, who apparently struggle under the illusion that a hundred years of systematic deception, fraudulent research, and destructive, disempowering “treatments” can be washed away by a blue picture of a brain.  This is a criticism of the APA, who apparently imagine that their brain chemical hoax, thoroughly discredited by competent authorities, can be sneaked subliminally back into play by incorporating a picture of a brain into their logo.

I have no way of knowing what the APA paid Porter Novelli for this work.  But if I were a member of the APA, I would certainly be asking.

42 COMMENTS

  1. Philip,

    I can’t thank you enough for all your excellent columns. Unfortunately, I fear that in 10 years, we will be having the same discussions as nothing is going to change. All you have to do is read psychiatry and mental health boards to understand.

    My best advice to people is to not become a customer of psychiatry. Unfortunately, that is easier said than done because as I keep mentioning on this board, even the regular medical field is drinking the psychiatric cool aid. But at least if you are aware of the land mines that exist, you can learn how to avoid them.

    Thanks again for what you do.

    AA

  2. Wow! Going from “wise sage” to “benevolent ruler”! Watch out. I went to the website and, sure enough, their swastika is no longer the image of Benjamin Rush. I wasn’t expecting that. I worry about this attention to being paid to becoming the authoritarian bully boys of medicine. It has worked, after a fashion, in the past. “Benevolent ruler” is more honest, after all, than “wise sage”, especially if your power hungry megalomaniac is going to lie his ass off to pretend to be something he is not, like “benevolent”, however is this any sort of improvement to brag about. Anyway, it is sort of amusing. I guess “wisdom” isn’t what it used to be, and I have to thank the emperors new wardrobe for that. I hope a great many people are able to see through it as well. Thanks for the inside view. The “benevolent ruler” role, I imagine, allows psychiatry to be more honest about its dishonesty while at the same time being more dishonest about its honesty. What do you call that, for the APA, a win/win situation all the way round? They just have to keep up the appearance of being “benevolent” even when them tough beans are tough beans. Nope, its your biological make up, chemistry, or something of the sort. Stick with us. Just like they’ve been saying for the last 200 plus years, any day now, rhwy’re going to crack that nut, and arrive at the answer. Now, um-mm, just what was the original question?…Oh, yeah. What makes a man dysfunction? Why don’t we start with psychiatry. Anyway, yes, how do we fight this hog wash? Perhaps with the truth, and that common sense that produces, in the long run, a few more wise sages than you get from a snow job..

  3. Laugh or cry? Laugh, for sure. The Porter Novelli branding video is priceless! And the snake symbol is a gift to satirists. The Royal College of Psychiatrists (UK) logo already features crazy snakes to symbolise “wisdom and health”. Now that the APA has adopted the snake too, this cartoon lampooning the RCPsych will work just as well in the US…
    http://www.auntiepsychiatry.com/AuntiePsychiatry/Auntie%20Psychiatry.html#wisdom

  4. In my job, I work with the children of an executive from a major PR company which promoted the DSM-5 as a scientific, useful catalogue of diagnoses.

    It’s funny because this parent is the nicest person, I love their kids, and yet I despise what the parent’s company did to promote the APA’s false labels. But I imagine that this parent, who seems emotionally healthy themself, has no idea that the “science” behind DSM labels is bullshit and that falsely legitimizing them does untold damage.

    Unfortunately, I cannot bring up my real opinions with the parent because I can’t afford to lose business! They would never guess their kids’ beloved teacher is a fervently against what their company advocates for.

    And as AA said, people need to avoid psychiatry at all costs – do not visit psychiatrists, do not take medications, do not go to hospitals, unless absolutely necessary or unavaoidable. See a non-psychiatric therapist or get help from support groups, friends, or family. Don’t be one of the crowd of people who take psych meds for years and decades, metaphorically acting like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A24Q0IXy5zw

  5. When I read Psychiatric Times, I often put myself in the position of being a first year resident, or a medical school student. What really strikes me is how often “anti-psychiatry bloggers” are mentioned and how they are discussed. I can’t imagine anyone coming there and thinking, “Gee, how well reasoned and fair this is. Well, of course, because this is Psychiatry and it’s all about understanding people”. The tone is decidedly eighth grade. “She said this about me, how dare she say this about me. I’m not talking to her or her friends at lunch, and I’m definitely not texting her anymore, so there”. I suspect the effort to enlist more psychiatric residents may well be increasingly difficult.

    • Remember the Dylan line “You know that something’s happening here but you don’t know what it is, do you Mr. Jones?” Think of psychiatry as Mr. Jones.

      What’s funny about this is we don’t really worry one iota about whatever psychiatrists are arguing with one another about in their blog conversations; at least it’s rarely something anyone would bring up here. Maybe what bothers them is that they know something’s happening here at MIA and that we consider their opinions about it to be largely irrelevant.

  6. “Caring Rulers,” eh? Well, at least they’re getting around to admitting the “ruler” part of it. Of course, the real answer to improving their image would be to put more energy into “caring” and less into “ruling.” But as far as I can tell, there isn’t as much money in caring, so ruling always takes precedence, with “caring” being the justification for the right to rule. As in “caring” enough to protect us from our poor, mentally disturbed selves by making all our decisions for us, and drugging us into a stupor if anyone has the temerity to object.

    —- Steve

  7. “Repositioning American Psychiatric Association from wise sage to caring ruler”

    Is there anything more telling than this? They’re so full of sh*t… “Caring rulers” – more like “tyrants” or “dictators” and caring has nothing to do with it.

  8. Seriously? Caring rulers? I hadn’t had such a good laugh in ages – Porter Novelli must have realised how appalling psychiatry is and is deliberately positioning it for ridicule. They have called psychiatry for what it is, surely?

    Having worked in PR (quiet a long time ago, admittedly), I cannot believe that any PR company worth its salt would have not seen what it was potentially doing. Snakes in brains and “caring rulers” harks back to the fantasy fiction genre of literature….Stephen Donaldson/Tolkien -type stuff.

    That APA didn’t spot it, just shows that shrinks have totally lost touch with reality.

    Let the humor and satire commence. LOL.

    • The APA just found out that last year Porter Novelli sent a Michael Jackson dancealike to an undisclosed location in Afghanistan to teach the Taliban how to moonwalk. After accusing Porter Novelli of holding out on them , the APA’s caring ruler thought leaders wanted to be designated as nurturing fearless leaders but Novelli said their client Putin the Fearless of the reconstituting Soviet Union already bought that label from Novelli long ago while he was head of the KBG. In a brilliant move to sooth the bruised ego’s of the wannabe nurturing fearless leaders Novelli promised upon his release from Afghanistan , their most accomplished moonwalking dance instructor will personally teach Pies, Lieberman and Torrey how to moonwalk and that that surely would make them beloved by the people. “And not to worry ” Novelli said, ” learning to moonwalk is a piece of cake compared to when we taught Clinton to play the sax and Reagan to chop wood. ” The only 2 blemishes on our resume was when we put Bush on the aircraft carrier and Dukakis in the tank .

  9. Psychiatry is largely robotic, unconscious plagiarism. How could it ever have even been ‘sage-like?’ And ruler of what, vulnerable and wounded people? So they spend how much to ‘improve their image,’ while being only defensive toward their legitimate and reasonable critics, rather than improving their industry and services? Interesting way to respond to people calling the field corrupt and crooked. “Hmmm, let’s see how much we can fool people with a PR campaign.” Really, that’s kind of stupid.

    • It’s gotten so obvious that the psychiatry and its many tangents are based on PR aka illusion. Playing on vulnerability, gullibility, ignorance, using buzz words, holograms, projecting false benevolence, etc., all the while collecting money and intoxicated with power. This isn’t a rant, either; to me, this just seems like a very obvious, neutral observation at this point, it is so evident from all the stories I’ve read and heard which remind me in so many ways of my own story of traversing the mental health industry. From what I’ve experienced, there seems to be no truth or substance to uphold it.

      What I’m scratching my head over is how it seems to withstand the hurricane of ire, resentment, and disdain sent its way? What on earth is holding up this specious house of cards?

        • One way to go after a corrupt agency is to appeal to its funding source, but of course in this case that’s just spitting into the wind, given the enormous financial gains made by both APA and pharma by this dark alliance. Hard to see one abandoning the other.

          However, I’m wondering if appealing to this PR agency would have any impact. Were they to hear survivors’ side of the story–via articulate personal testimonials such as given constantly on this website–to highlight the utter lack of truth of their campaign, perhaps that would give them pause about representing them. I’m sure there is tons of $$ involved here, too, but a PR firm has their own reputation to consider, as well. Might be worth a shot, and if it were to work, perhaps that would help to DISABLE psychiatry.

          I don’t think it has to be an angry appeal, but more so one of “Were you aware that psychiatry (fill in blank with examples)…?” Along with, “please reconsider this business association, for the sake of a sound humanity.” Something like that…

  10. “What I’m scratching my head over is how it seems to withstand the hurricane of ire, resentment , and disdain sent its way ? What on earth is holding up this specious house of cards ?”

    They have examples from history , precedent , its been done before, the stubborn attempt to ride a large rolling false temporary {could mean for even centuries) construction, to wealth and power while seeing great disadvantage to themselves and their families if it is allowed to be dismantled. While believing along the way they are too big to fail and that meanwhile humongous collateral damage to human beings is acceptable as the robber barons behind the curtain have long sought and continue to back eugenic solutions by all means necessary under their selective control, hidden behind various terminologies and backed by endless supplies of currency . Also of interest the film” Ethos ” on Youtube , also see the Zeitgeist 3 part film series on Youtube .

    Novelli’s logo for the APA, a from the top down view of a divided in the center blue colored brain with a sidewinder snake’s alternating coil crossing across both hemispheres reminding all that this is going to hurt.

    • Great answer, Fred, thanks. I can see that. Well, the honest truth is that, funding streams or not, they HAVE failed, it’s a done deal. At least that false belief is being challenged in so many ways, and loudly. Eventually, everyone wakes up, one way or another.

      • Not everybody, and that is the point. I don’t think psychiatry is about health so much as it is about social control. Money and power have one more means of assuring their grip over the populace.The status quo must lower the boom. ‘Step out of line’, and they’ve got a place for you. It’s state power at, or down to, the familial level. People are howling about the urgent need to do something about a discordant family member. Now whether you’re dealing with police science or a branch of medicine has never been the penultimate question in most peoples minds facing it. The question is usually, ‘how do we deal with this specific disruptive person or that in real time?’ There is a certain amount of absolution seen in calling what is seen as misbehavior “disease”, and in leaving that solution to a profession that purports to be medical.

        • “I don’t think psychiatry is about health so much as it is about social control. Money and power have one more means of assuring their grip over the populace.”

          Right, but mainstream psychiatry continues to be entrenched, despite the fact that it has lost the intellectual battle, because too many have bought the idea that standard treatment relieves the distress of labeled people rather than the fear and discomfort of the larger society. The drug protocol and its demonstrated harm seems like a small price to pay for others to feel safe and comfortable with people labeled as mentally ill. Tragically, this is often the case with their own families (e.g., NAMI), who may be well motivated but are misguided. I continue to believe that the recovery movement, to succeed, must make significant inroads within the NAMI membership; not the leadership that sold out to Big Pharma, but the rank and file who continue to struggle and may be increasingly receptive to our message, having seen the benefit of drugging cocktails.

        • “Not everybody, and that is the point.”

          Ok, perhaps wishful thinking, but it keeps me motivated to continue this work, otherwise it starts to feel like a black hole, and extremely discouraging.

          “I don’t think psychiatry is about health so much as it is about social control. Money and power have one more means of assuring their grip over the populace. The status quo must lower the boom. ‘Step out of line’, and they’ve got a place for you. It’s state power at, or down to, the familial level. People are howling about the urgent need to do something about a discordant family member.”

          Then the problem starts in the family, doesn’t it? The family situation has gotten extreme and horrific, because we have been in such deep, deep denial of just how toxic families have become. Just last week I read THREE stories of a parent killing their child. This seems to be a trend. Madness. Where is the community, here?

          “Now whether you’re dealing with police science or a branch of medicine has never been the penultimate question in most peoples minds facing it. The question is usually, ‘how do we deal with this specific disruptive person or that in real time?’ There is a certain amount of absolution seen in calling what is seen as misbehavior “disease”, and in leaving that solution to a profession that purports to be medical.”

          Anything that challenges our extremely narrow and rigid norm, as defined by the power & money elite (however this protocol works, via media, etc), is going to invite blatant stigma (e.g., creating the pretense of ‘disease’ for the child) and lead to oppression and control.

          Those who were wounded by family dynamics–and there are tons of us–are vulnerable to this, because family shaming, rejecting, ostracizing, demeaning, etc., create a template of post-traumatic stress, which, if addressed directly and with positive, loving attention, can heal. It’s not unusual to heal from our past, that’s really quite natural.

          However, this is not what occurs in the mental health and social service worlds. Instead, what I’ve mostly seen is a lot of professionals pushing these buttons in others to weaken, disorient, and control. I just find this so incredibly disturbing.

          • There is nothing new about infanticide. The ideal family image that some people have is often at complete odds with the reality.

            I agree about mental health and social services. You’ve got this vast bureaucracy that while claiming to be about one thing is actually about something altogether different. All too often, the people gaining the most from these professions are not recipients. This sort of situation definitely makes getting out of need very problematic indeed. The crux of the problem often being the professions themselves. When their interests are in conflict with the recipient’s, the recipient must think about finding ways to circumvent their services.

            I’ve heard social services people speak of certain clients as being scr*wed, however doing so doesn’t unscr*w the client so-to-speak.

          • “There is nothing new about infanticide. The ideal family image that some people have is often at complete odds with the reality.”

            I know there is vast continuum between family murder and ‘the ideal family.’

            Lots of devilish things been going on for a long time that have cast violent shadow on our society, that have in recent years been coming to light, thanks to the supersonic social media information highway. That’s an awakening happening that is creating tremendous unrest globally. How else does radical change come about without severe agitation to motivate people to take risks and authentically, in person, challenge social norms? Now we’re getting it.

            We talk a lot on here about how kids are poisoned with toxic medication early in life. We want to know where to look to create some kind of healing change. We talk about bringing cohesion to community, for it to be supportive and welcoming of diverse personalities and processes. And yet, we can’t even achieve this within a family. Who is the head of the family, and what is his or her affect on others? That’s the seat of power in a community.

            Where are the role models of healthy community? I’ve heard people describing what would appeal to them and what sounds unconditionally loving and supportive, but do we have an example upon which to draw? Would you say this is ‘too ideal?’ I’m at a loss, here.

            When we deny where the ‘diseasing’ process begins, we avoid seeing where change can be most effective and far-reaching because it is at the root of the issue. Group dynamics begin in the family. This is our first community, so it makes a resounding imprint on our psyches, hearts, spirits, and I believe even on a cellular level, that most deeply affects our beliefs, perception, and choices. It also affects us physically, many things can go out of whack due to toxic dysfunction. That would be ‘a sick society,’ and many families are sick societies, so this is our first environment, which we internalize, whether we like it or not.

            This is our most powerful teaching example, if only through constant and highly interactive exposure. Kids learn from the adults around them this way. Addressing what we took on from a toxic family dysfunction (which can range from blatant to subtle and quite insidious) is where healing and integration can be most powerful, and permanent.

          • “You’ve got this vast bureaucracy that while claiming to be about one thing is actually about something altogether different. All too often, the people gaining the most from these professions are not recipients. This sort of situation definitely makes getting out of need very problematic indeed. The crux of the problem often being the professions themselves. When their interests are in conflict with the recipient’s, the recipient must think about finding ways to circumvent their services.”

            And yes, I think this is spot on. It is not the generous, attentive, and humble community it needs to be in order to help people heal. It is a black hole, inherently.

  11. I like the new logo personally.

    Broken brains being fixed through the use of force (the stick) and failing that, inject the venom (one for the AC/DC fans 🙂

    The Caduceus of Hermes might have been a little more appropriate.

    “As god of the high-road and the market-place Hermes was perhaps above all else the patron of commerce and the fat purse: as a corollary, he was the special protector of the traveling salesman. As spokesman for the gods, he not only brought peace on earth (occasionally even the peace of death), but his silver-tongued eloquence could always make the worse appear the better cause. From this latter point of view, would not his symbol be suitable for certain Congressmen, all medical quacks, book agents and purveyors of vacuum cleaners, rather than for the straight-thinking, straight-speaking therapeutist? As conductor of the dead to their subterranean abode, his emblem would seem more appropriate on a hearse than on a physician’s car.”

  12. “”Mindful of the continuing stigma associated with mental illness and psychiatric treatment, we retained an outside consultant agency (Porter Novelli) to review APA’s communications capabilities, needs, and opportunities. Based on its report, we are now moving forward with an initiative to enact a sophisticated and proactive communications plan that will be directed both internally to APA members and externally to the media, mental health stakeholder groups, and the general public.””

    Mindful that you are coming under fire, and don’t have the armor of God (the belt of truth buckled round your waist, with the breastplate of righteousness in place, and with your feet fitted with the readiness that comes from the gospel of peace, and in addition to all this, the shield of faith, with which you can extinguish all the flaming arrows of the injured ones, and the helmet of salvation and the sword of the Spirit, which is the word of God)… LOL

    Mindful that you are coming under fire, and don’t have the armor of God, you bring your protector and defender, Porter Novelli, serving YOUR needs and YOUR opportunities.

    Really don’t want to collapse, crash, crumble, fall apart, lose and suffer – do you, APA.

    That’s what every “patient” and “consumer” was also hoping to avoid, in turning to your terribly deceptive house of help.

    You get a representative to serve you and your sophistication, while we get unnecessary brain destabilizing neurotoxins, conformity, brainwash, indoctrination, and, once disabled, become permanent wards of the state.

    See how self-serving you are, o industry?

    • P.S.

      You’re not really head honcho, APA. You’re just one head of a multi-globed monstrosity.

      But relax, cuz you aren’t the beast. You’re the anti-christ, anti-depressant, anti-anxiety and anti-spirit.

      PTHOOO! (that’s a bullet).

    • I’d rather be a walnut because at least they look like brains. And they taste really good (walnuts, I mean. I don’t want to eat brains, no thank you).

      I think there’s a huge motivating factor – instead of focusing on money, knowledge and technology (skills and abilities, which then translate as powers) – that we should juggle around, just to see if it produces anything toward the goal of social justice.

      It is much better to give than to receive.

      Acts 20:35 New King James Version (NKJV)

      35 I have shown you in every way, by laboring like this, that you must support the weak. And remember the words of the Lord Jesus, that He said, ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.’”

      There’s something irresistible, for some people, to be the hero. The messiah. The savior. The champion. The victor. The presider. The provider. The giver. The doer. The healer. The boss. The authority.

      The safety and the security of it, the glory and the pride, the exultation.

      Somewhere along the line though, it seems like things became distorted and perverted: dominance and submission (subjugation, obedience). It wasn’t about supporting the weak. It was about being the boss, the authority, the top dog.

      “Trust us, we know what we’re doing.” (heebie jeebies and barf)

      By the looks of it, no you don’t (I’m talking to psychiatry and the mental system, and the government agencies that support them).

      See here,

      Many of us have complained that our counselors and therapists were on another level (maybe somebody else can chime in and speak on that, better than I can). We, some of us, felt as if we weren’t there to be helped, but were there to serve the professionals’ needs to be the professionals. I know others can articulate that better than I can.

      So, there’s some social aspect of it. For example, the tremendous security that people like social workers for state agencies feel in their superiority and authority, over others.

      Anybody see what I’m getting at?

      I think it’s one of the core, primary, motivating, driving factors there is.

      It isn’t pleasant or comfortable to be the one who needs support and assistance (which can be so very vulnerable and insecure, and even punitively consequential and dangerous).

      Know what I mean?

      Lastly, I think I’m motivated to respond to Jeremy’s comment because it saddens me. It hurts and it doesn’t feel good and it isn’t very helpful to be called nuts, or cuckoo, or crazy, or psycho, or wacko, or nutjob (oh wow, hear the laughter?) …