Thursday, April 2, 2020

Not Your Great-Grandfather’s Psychoanalysis

From the Monitor on Psychology: One of the greatest misconceptions about psychoanalytic and psychodynamic therapy is that it has remained unchanged since Freud introduced it. In...

“Study Links Mobile Device Addiction to Depression and Anxiety”

A study published in the journal Computers in Human Behavior found that addictions to mobile devices are linked to anxiety and depression in college students....

A Suicide Therapist’s Secret Past

In this piece for The New York Times, suicidologist and psychotherapist Stacey Freedenthal tells her story of having struggled with suicidality and discusses the importance...

“Post-Katrina Stress Disorder: Climate Change and Mental Health”

Writing for Truth-Out, hurricane Katrina survivor G. Maris Jones writes: “To adapt to a changing climate, survivors of these catastrophes - especially those in marginalized, low-income communities - need long-term physical and mental health services.” She adds a concurrent call to “assume our responsibility to make positive change through action on climate change.”

“The Impact of Shift Work on Health”

Medical News Today provides an overview of the research on the effects of shift work on the physical and mental well-being of employees. "Although...

Bullying & its Long-Term Effects on Wellness

Psychologist William Copeland writes for Mental Health Recovery that “bullying can occur at any age and the effects of which remain harmful long after the behavior has been endured.” “We, as a society, are just beginning to understand and come to terms with the havoc that bullying wreaks on the emotional lives of its victims.

My Life on Antidepressants

In this piece for Vogue, model and writer Sydney Lima shares her experiences with the adverse effects of Sertraline and Bupropion. "For the next few months,...

The Moving Basis of Mental Health Diagnosis

In this opinion piece for The Chronicle Herald, Dr. A.J. discusses the subjective nature of psychiatric diagnosis and the DSM. Citing research by Paula Kaplan,...

No New Prozacs: A Dry Pipeline for New Psychiatric Drugs

In 1988, the introduction of Prozac was hailed as a breakthrough in the treatment of depression. A quarter of a century later, the prospect of a similar breakthrough in psychiatric medications seems remote. On August 19, 2013, the New York Times ran an article called, “A Dry Pipeline for Psychiatric Drugs".

Behavioral Therapy (Including Parents) More Effective for ADHD than Drugs

Stimulant medication does not improve the academic performance or test scores of the 9% of all children in the U.S. diagnosed with ADHD, according to...

“Why Does Psychiatry So Often Get a Free Pass on Standards of Evidence?”

Rob Wipond takes HealthNewsReview.org to task for its coverage of a Philadelphia Inquirer article about a medical device designed for people experiencing panic. He writes that “hyperbolic psychiatric and psychological claims frequently get free passes from otherwise thoughtful medical critics.”

Depression, Anxiety, PTSD: The Mental Impact of Climate Change

From CNN: The growing climate change crisis is leading to various types of trauma, including increased natural disasters, economic loss for farmers, and forced migration, all...

Lack of Sleep May be a Cause of Mental Health Conditions

From Live Science: A new study published in The Lancet Psychiatry found that participants who completed an online cognitive behavioral therapy program specifically for insomnia experienced...

Mental Illness is the Leading Cause of Military Hospitalizations

Since 2001 almost $2 billion have been spent on drugs to treat mental illness and PTSD in soldiers, but mental illness is still the...

All Mental Disorders Are Brain Disorders…Not

In this blog post, Eiko Fried disputes the pervasive assumption that the most common psychiatric diagnoses are biologically based brain disorders, asserting that the...

AI-Controlled Brain Implants for Mood Disorders Tested in People

From Nature: Two teams funded by the US military's research arm, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), have begun preliminary trials of brain implants...

Anxiety and the Severity of Mania

Researchers from Spain, noting that "anxiety has scarcely been studied in acute mania," analyzed data from 242 patients admitted for a diagnosis of acute...

When Algorithms Are Running the Asylum

From Neo.life: The emerging discipline of computational psychiatry, which aims to use machine-learning algorithms to recognize patterns of mental distress and identify treatments that may be...

Inadequate Blinding Associated With Positive Treatment Findings, Industrial Sponsorship, and Schizophrenia Diagnosis

Despite the integral importance of blinding and blinding assessment to randomized controlled trials (RCTs), they are rarely reported on or documented in trial reports...

The Rise of Solitary

From Dissent Magazine: In her recently published book 23/7: Pelican Bay Prison and the Rise of Long-Term Solitary Confinement, scholar and advocate Keramet Reiter discusses the...

“Terror Management Theory and our Response to the Paris Attacks”

In this short audio clip, psychologist Sheldon Solomon discusses what research on our unconscious fears about death can tell us about terrorism, intolerance, and radicalism. “In the wake of the Paris attacks, we examine the worm that some people think is eating away at our core — our fear of death.”

Minority Groups Found Less Likely to Get Mental Health Care

From California Healthline: Although people of color are much more likely to suffer from severe psychological distress, they are less likely to receive mental health...

Fostering Secure Attachment Prevents Depression and Anxiety

Researchers from China and the Harvard Medical School studied the effects of anxious and avoidant attachment on the development of depression and anxiety in...

Older Patients Being Prescribed Risky Anticholinergic Drugs

From MinnPost: A new University of Minnesota study has found that anticholinergic drugs, including antidepressants, continue to be prescribed to millions of older Americans despite...

This is the Fastest way to Calm Down

From TIME: A recent study suggests a neurological explanation for why deep breathing can be so effective in reducing stress and anxiety. Article →­

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