Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Will Psychiatry’s Harmful Treatment of Our Children Bring About Its Eventual Demise?

The safety of our children is a sacred obligation we strive to preserve. Anything or anyone that harms them becomes the object of our...

Global Mental Health Research Needs Cultural Perspective

This paper in Transcultural Psychiatry states that global mental health (GMH) research "appears to be using a monocultural model that is individualistic, illness-oriented, and...

Air Pollution Linked to Mental Health Problems in Children

A new study, published in BMJ Open-Access this week, found a significant link between the level of air pollution in a community and the mental health of the children living there. After controlling for socio-economic status and other potential variables, researchers in Sweden discovered a strong association between the concentration of air pollution in a neighborhood and the amount of ‘antipsychotic’ and psychiatric drugs prescribed to children. The link remained strong even at pollution levels well below half of what is considered acceptable by the World Health Organization (WHO).

Danish Study Finds Better 10-year Outcomes in Patients Off Antipsychotics

Study finds that 74% of patients with a psychotic disorder off antipsychotics at end of 10 years are in remission.

United Nations Statement Criticizes Medicalization of Depression on World Health Day

"There is a need of a shift in investments in mental health, from focusing on 'chemical imbalances' to focusing on 'power imbalances' and inequalities"

Responding to Madness With Loving Receptivity: a Practical Guide

In my last three blogs I posed the question- "If madness isn't what psychiatry says it is, then what is it?" Now I'm asking-...

The Conflicts That Result From Globalizing Euro-American Psychology in India

Researchers examine the transformation of work, life, and identity in India as a result of Western corporate and psychological culture.

How Stigma and Social Factors Drive the Negative Health Outcomes Associated with Autism

A new study explores the interplay between social stress and quality of life for individuals self-identified with high-functioning autism.

Do We Really Need Mental Health Professionals?

Professionals across the Western world, from a range of disciplines, earn their livings by offering services to reduce the misery and suffering of the people who seek their help. Do these paid helpers represent a fundamental force for healing, facilitating the recovery journeys of people with mental health problems, or are they a substantial part of the problem by maintaining our modestly effective and often damaging system?

Robert Whitaker Missed the Mark on Drugs and Disability: A Call for a Focus...

Robert Whitaker extended one of his core arguments from Anatomy of an Epidemic in a blog post last week. His argument revolves around the claim that psychiatric drugs are the principal cause of increasing psychiatric disability, as measured by U.S. social security disability claims. But does this really explain the rise in recipients of these SSI & SSDI benefits?

Psychosocial Adversities Should be Included in Diagnosis

Proposal to include psychosocial adversities that impact mental health in ICD and DSM diagnoses.

Neoliberalism Drives Increase in Perfectionism Among College Students

Meta-analytic study detects upsurge in patterns of perfectionism in young adults and explores how neoliberalism contributes to this trend.
2nd Story respite house

The Never Ending Story: How 2nd Story Respite House Was Saved

We had built relationships with provider and peer organizations and NAMI. We had learned how to interface with the system and share the peer perspective. Ultimately, our relationships saved us. We had worked to start our own organization with the same providers who now were in position to step forward in our defense.

Is Anxiety to Blame for Missed School?

A new systematic review illustrates features of the relationship between anxiety and school attendance patterns.

10 Reasons Survivors Might Know More Medicine Than Psychiatrists

We've been discussing a potential role for psychiatrists on this site, and I wanted some of the doctors to understand why many mental health...

Study Finds Racial Differences in Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment

Black patients are almost twice as likely as their white counterparts to be diagnosed with schizophrenia while whites are significantly more likely to receive a diagnosis of anxiety or depression, according to a recent study published in the journal Psychiatric Services. The researchers also found that the likelihood of receiving psychotherapy for any diagnosis (34%), regardless of race or ethnicity, was much lower than the likelihood of receiving a psychotropic medication (73%).

The Alternative to Drugs: The Real Treatment for Human Suffering

My opposition to psychiatric drugs is not just that they are harmful, dangerous, and destructive. That would be plenty motivation enough. And it is. But in addition, my profession, which I love and value, has been hijacked by the APA and Big Pharma. It is my goal to return psychiatry to its proper place - where good psychotherapy is understood to be the treatment for human suffering.

Integrating Indigenous Healing Practices and Psychotherapy for Global Mental Health

As the Global Mental Health Movement attempts to address cross-cultural mental health disparities, a new article encourages integrating traditional healing practices with psychotherapy.

Researchers Argue that ‘ADHD’ Doesn’t Meet DSM Definition of a Disorder

New research questions whether the diagnosis of ADHD even meets the criteria for a disorder, as set out in the manuals used by the medical and psychiatric fields.

More Physical Activity-Based Mental Health Interventions Needed in Schools

What physical activity-based programs are being implemented in schools, how are they being researched, and what kind of impact have they made?

My Journey to Freedom, A Three-Part Story

I have written this story, a story of Exodus to Freedom, a thousand times. I retell it to myself late at night while I lie on my air mattress. In the mornings I may recall these amazing events while running along the beach straight into the sunrise. I walk my dog and tell the story again, hoping passers-by don’t think I’m talking to myself, lest I be called “loco.” But that has never happened. The one aim I had when coming to Uruguay has come true: Not one person here considers me crazy.

Eat Breathe Thrive: Chelsea Roff on Eating Disorders, Trauma, and Healing with Yoga and...

Chelsea Roff is the Founder and Director of Eat Breathe Thrive (EBT), a non-profit with an inspired mission to bring yoga, mindfulness, and community support to people struggling with negative body image and disordered eating. I reached out to Chelsea to learn more about her life and organization, which she writes, “…is like AA for people with food and body image issues, plus yoga and meditation.” Chelsea shared her journey from life as a patient to yogi, author, and innovative community organizer. With her permission, you can find this interview below.

Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia? What About Black People?

In many respects it is difficult to fault the report Understanding Psychosis and Schizophrenia, recently published by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and the Division of Clinical Psychology (DCP)[i]; indeed, as recent posts on Mad in America have observed, there is much to admire in it. Whilst not overtly attacking biomedical interpretations of psychosis, it rightly draws attention to the limitations and problems of this model, and points instead to the importance of contexts of adversity, oppression and abuse in understanding psychosis. But the report makes only scant, fleeting references to the role of cultural differences and the complex relationships that are apparent between such differences and individual experiences of psychosis.

Community-Driven Healthcare for the Homeless Reduces Hospital Costs

Direct access to care in safe locations is key in reducing healthcare costs and increasing quality of life for homeless populations.

Study Explores Sexual and Intimate Partner Violence in College Women with Disabilities

A new study explores sexual violence and intimate partner violence in college women with mental health related disabilities.

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