Tuesday, June 22, 2021

What is Contributory Injustice in Psychiatry?

An article on contributory injustice describes the clinical and ethical imperative that clinicians listen to service users experiences.

The Concept of Schizophrenia is Coming to an End – Here’s Why

From The Conversation: Many researchers are beginning to acknowledge that the concept of "schizophrenia" as a discrete, hopeless, and deteriorating brain disease does not exist. In...

Mental Health Recovery Narratives Play Central Role in Trauma-Informed Care

New research synthesizes insights from 45 studies to construct a conceptual framework relating different elements of recovery narratives to trauma-informed approaches to care.

“Can Madness Save the World?”

Writing for CounterPunch, Paris Williams writes that when an individual is experiencing what has been termed “psychosis,” it is important to recognize that this may also be the manifestation of a breakdown in their larger social groups, the family, society, and even the species.

Opening A Dialogue In Mental Health

I have sometimes stopped en route to work, unsure how much longer I can continue. There is a sense of betrayal to my father and grandmother by working in a profession that failed them and is the only medical specialty to have its own survivor movement, not from the illnesses it hopes to treat, but from the ministrations of the profession itself.

The Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode (RAISE) Study: Notes from the Trenches

I was a psychiatrist who participated in the Recovery After an Initial Schizophrenia Episode Early Treatment Program (RAISE ETP). Although I welcomed the positive headlines that heralded the study's results, the reports left me with mixed feelings. What happened to render the notion that talking to people about their experiences and helping them find jobs or go back to school is something novel?

How Feedback Can Improve Psychotherapy Treatment

Researcher examines the impact of client feedback and progress assessment on improvement in outcomes.

Researchers Present Structural Competency Training Model for Psychiatrists

Researchers argue that a structural competency and social determinants of health approach must be made central to psychiatry training.

Anyone Can Be Trained to Hallucinate

From Flipboard: In a recent study on auditory hallucinations, all participants — not just those who had been diagnosed with psychosis — experienced conditioned hallucinations. The study...

Critical Psychiatry: Importance of Interviewing

For the Critical Psychiatry blog, Duncan Double writes that psychological formulation and psychosocial assessment may provide a way forward to a “new psychiatry” that moves on from modern concepts of mental illness as chemical imbalance or some other abnormality of the brain.

Researchers Question “Gold Standard” Status of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Researchers argue for plurality and diversity among psychotherapy approaches and question the perceived superiority of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

How Do We Prevent Loneliness?

Loneliness has been linked to negative health outcomes, but there are no interventions clearly proven to ‘fix’ the problem.

First-Person Accounts of Madness and Global Mental Health: An Interview with Dr. Gail Hornstein

Dr. Gail Hornstein, author of Agnes’s Jacket: A Psychologist’s Search for the Meanings of Madness, discusses the importance of personal narratives and service-user activism in the context of the global mental health movement.

Storytelling Therapy for Trauma and Bullying

A study out of the University of Buffalo explores the use of Narrative Exposure Therapy to treat youth PTSD and substance abuse. “Trauma is...
liberty bell

Filling the Crack in the Liberty Bell

Instead of an echo-chamber conference, in which treatment “experts” present to other treatment providers, and those with lived experience gather in their own rooms, the ISPS-US conference allowed for the clash of diverse opinions, which could sometimes amalgamate into something greater than the sum of its parts.

New Study Investigates Negative Side Effects of Therapy

Researchers find that nearly half of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) patients experience treatment side effects.

“How Meditation Changes the Brain and Body”

In the New York Times Well Blog, Gretchen Reynolds covers a study published in Biological Psychiatry showing that mindfulness meditation, unlike a placebo, “can change...

Valuing Posttraumatic Growth in Psychosis

Individuals who experience psychosis can also experience posttraumatic growth, which can be a central component of the recovery paradigm.

Family Oriented, Home-Based Treatment Best for Youth with Symptoms of Psychosis

A pathbreaking new study out of Finland suggests that early intervention programs for youth experiencing psychotic-like symptoms may see the greatest improvement when treatment works within the home rather than in a hospital setting. The research, to be published in next month’s issue of Psychiatry Research, found greater improvement in functioning, depression, and hopelessness among teens in a new need-adapted Family and Community oriented Integrative Treatment Model (FCTM) program.

Psychodynamic Therapy Revealed to be as Efficacious as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Meta-analytic study finds that psychodynamic therapy outcomes are equivalent to those of CBT and other empirically supported treatments.

Study Finds Recalling Experiences of Violence Impairs Cognitive Functioning

Recalling past exposure to violence worsens short-term memory and cognitive control.

Mindfulness Therapy May Be More Effective Without Antidepressants

While an estimated 74-percent of patients diagnosed with major depression receive a prescription for an antidepressant, new research reveals that mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT)...

Research Finds Parents’ Trauma May Impact Children’s Health

Study uncovers some of the intergenerational consequences of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).

Self-Compassion Course Supports College Students to Support Themselves

New research on a brief self-compassion focused course aimed at the college students.

The Effects of Practicing Psychotherapy on Therapists’ Personal Lives

A new study, published in Psychotherapy Research, explores how having a career in psychotherapy affects therapists’ personal lives.

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