Many Psychiatric Patients Sent Home With Multiple Antipsychotics Against Guidelines

Despite the fact that clinical practice guidelines specifically recommend against the use of more than one antipsychotic at once, new research reveals that as many as 12% of all psychiatric patients are discharged with multiple prescriptions for these drugs. The latest study, published open-access this week in the Journal of Psychiatric Practice, finds that the prescription of multiple antipsychotics continues to be an issue affecting nearly ten thousand patients every year in psychiatric hospitals alone.

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Researchers Investigate Antidepressant-Induced Suicidal Ideation

An increase in suicidal thoughts is a known and serious side-effect for various types of antidepressants. Recent studies suggest that there may be some genetic factors that increase the risk for this reaction. A new study, in the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, identifies two specific genetic variants that are associated with worsening suicidal ideation in patients taking antidepressants.

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“European Regulator Recommends Suspending Numerous Drugs Over Clinical Trial Problems”

Pharmalot’s Ed Silverman reports that a number of generic drugs, sold by Novartis and Teva Pharmaceuticals, may be pulled off of the shelves after it was revealed that they were approved based on “flawed studies.” The flawed studies all came out of an Indian clinical research organization, Semler Research Center, that was found to have “significant instances of misconduct and violations of federal regulations, including the substitution and manipulation of study subject samples.”

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Study Finds Improved Functioning for ‘Schizophrenia’ Without Antipsychotics

Long-term treatment with antipsychotic drugs is currently considered the standard treatment for patients diagnosed with ‘schizophrenia.’ A new study challenges this practice, however. The results, published this month in Psychological Medicine, reveal that patients who were not taking antipsychotic drugs had significantly higher levels of functioning than medicated patients.

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The Case Against Antipsychotics

At times, I think that I must seem like a dog with a bone, and that I just can’t let this one particular subject—the long-term effects of psychiatric drugs—go. I wrote about this in Anatomy of an Epidemic, and since then I have given many talks and written many blogs on the topic, and more recently, I engaged in a back-and-forth of sorts with Ronald Pies and Allen Frances about this. But I do think it is important that the relevant science is known, and with that thought in mind, I decided to write a paper that, in as succinct a manner as possible, would make the “case against antipsychotics.”
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“Selling Side Effects: Big Pharma’s Marketing Machine?”

Drug Watch releases an in-depth investigation into the marketing practices of pharmaceutical companies in the United States. “Companies spend billions advertising to doctors to get them to prescribe their brand-name drugs and devices. They also spend billions paying criminal and civil settlements resulting from fraudulent marketing. Do these practices empower patients or expose them to newer, riskier and more expensive drugs and devices?”

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Violence Caused by Antidepressants: An Update after Munich  

The media is now reporting details about the 18-year-old who shot and killed nine and wounded many others before killing himself on July 22 in Munich. My clinical and forensic experience leads to a distinction among people who murder under the influence of psychiatric drugs. Those who kill only one or two people, or close family members, often have little or no history of mental disturbance and violent tendencies. The drug itself seems like the sole cause of the violent outburst. On the other hand, most of those who commit mass violence while taking psychiatric drugs often have a long history of mental disturbance and sometimes violence. For these people, the mental health system seems to have provoked increasing violence without recognizing the danger.
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More Children Receiving ‘Off-Label’ Antipsychotics for ‘ADHD’

Over the past twenty years, the number of prescriptions for atypical antipsychotics written to children and young adults between four and eighteen has increased precipitously, according to the results of a recent study published in the journal Medicine. Two-thirds of these antipsychotics were prescribed “off-label” for unapproved uses, many for children diagnosed with ‘ADHD.’

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Falling Through the Cracks

I am an award-winning singer/songwriter with a number one record to my credit. I also owned several small businesses and founded a 501c3 non-profit for women’s health. I ate healthy, swam and cycled every day and had a very active lifestyle. This was before benzos came into my life. Since withdrawing from benzodiazepines five months ago, I still cannot play one of my own compositions all the way through without a mistake.
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Despite Official Recommendations, Depression Screening in Children is Not Supported by Research

Earlier this year, the US Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) came out with the controversial recommendation that all adolescent and adult patients undergo depression screening in primary care. A new study, published in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, calls this recommendation into question. Researchers led by Brett Thombs from McGill University reviewed the accuracy of the existing screening instruments used for the detection of depression in children and adolescents and found insufficient evidence for their use.

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Researchers Discover How Antipsychotics Lead To Parkinsonism

A new study published this month in the journal Neuron identifies the mechanism by which antipsychotic drugs can induce parkinsonism, a condition involving movement abnormalities.  The researchers found that antipsychotics block D2 dopamine receptors in a part of the brain called the striatum, specifically acting on interneurons in this area, leading to problems with movement.

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Placebo: A Groundbreaking, Clinically Proven Treatment

In this Shouts & Murmurs video from the New Yorker placebo pills get the full drug advertisement treatment.

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Antidepressants Often Prescribed to Enforce Heteronormativity, Study Concludes

A new study investigating fifteen years of patient records at a Midwestern hospital found that psychiatrists almost always responded to patient complaints about their relationships by prescribing antidepressants, despite the fact that these complaints had little to do with the DSM criteria for depression. The study’s lead author, Jonathan Metzl, a professor of Sociology and Medicine, Health and Society at Vanderbilt, suggests that after the decision in 1974 to remove homosexuality from the DSM, psychiatry continued to enforce forms of socially accepted relationships through the prescription of antidepressants.

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“Antidepressants Cost NHS £5.5m A Week”

The Times Katie Gibbons reports that the UK “NHS is spending a record £780,000 a day on antidepressants as failing mental health services struggle to provide alternative therapies.”

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“Antidepressants Are A Quick Fix In A Broken System”

For The Times, Labour MP Luciana Berger writes about her concerns with the increased use of antidepressants. “Antidepressants should never be prescribed as a first response to mild depression,” she writes. “Psychological therapies are what the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends. Unlike fluoxetine, citalopram and the rest, talking therapies are non-addictive and can be matched to a patient’s needs.”

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Latest World Benzodiazepine Awareness Day (W-BAD) Video

“We asked people from all over the world to share about the iatrogenic injury they sustained from taking benzodiazepines as prescribed and why they are participating in 'World Benzodiazepine Awareness Day' on July 11th. These are their stories...”

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“Depression Pills Made Me Unfit To Be A Mother”

The award-winning documentarian, Katinka Blackford Newman, talks to the Daily Mail about her new book on the dangers of antidepressants, The Pill That Steals Lives: One Woman’s Terrifying Journey To Discover The Truth About Antidepressants.

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Announcing an International Symposium and Institute on Psychiatric Drug Risks and Withdrawal

I have given up on psychiatry as a system capable of “being there” for people who are dealing with life and death issues. Psychiatry as a system of care lacks validity. Every day — unfortunately — we learn of new examples proving this statement. But here’s the good news: every day we meet people who show us that the predictions of psychiatry are not true; that there are “cures,” that it is possible to reduce or withdraw psychiatric drugs. This October 15th, we will host Scientific Symposium – Psychiatric Drug Risk and Alternatives in Gothenburg, Sweden, to gather and build on what we learn from them.
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“Jury Smacks J&J with $70M in Damages in Latest Risperdal Breast Case”

Fierce Pharma reports: "Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ) is fighting more than 1,500 legal claims that its antipsychotic Risperdal triggered breast development in boys, and the company has landed on the wrong side of a jury verdict in several of them so far. The same thing happened Friday in a Philadelphia court. The difference, this time, is that the jury smacked J&J with a $70 million damages award--many times larger than previous awards in similar cases." More →

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Consequences of Taking the Yellow Brick Road: Lithium Carbonate 1984-1996

I was first given Lithium Carbonate in the spring of 1984, and I was taken off Lithium by my attending physician in 1996, but left on other drugs. It took me until 2012 to realize psychiatry is a sham. So often people tell me, “I don’t care what my life is like ten years from now. I only want to feel good now.” I may have said the same thing twenty years ago. Now I have the hindsight to know that my viewpoint back then was juvenile at best. I try to warn other patients these days. It’s hard to joke around about something that kills people.
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Benzos: A Dance With the Devil

Beginning with the glamorization of Miltown in the 1950’s, the “I don’t care” pill was a way to ease the growing awareness that the world is indeed unsafe, and that something is deeply bankrupt in the promises of burgeoning science, technology, and industrialization. Still, we sought to heal these wounds through application of more of the same mentality – one of dominance, management, and suppression of all obstacles into submission. As our bodies, minds, and spirits become more and more separated from nature, each other, and ourselves, the worry, discomfort, and unease mount. Now that the going has gotten very tough, we are reaching for medications more than ever. Surely, however, turning off the smoke alarm is not the best way to deal with a fire.
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SSRI Does Not Improve Outcomes or Mood for Patients with Heart Failure

A study released this week in JAMA examined whether giving patients with chronic heart failure and depression the SSRI antidepressant escitalopram (Lexapro) for two years would improve their mood and health outcomes. The results of the randomized control trial reveal that the antidepressant not only failed to improve physical health outcomes but also failed to improve depression symptoms.

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“Drug and Device Makers Paid $6.5 Billion to Docs and Teaching Hospitals Last Year”

From Ed Silverman with Pharmalot: “Drug and device makers paid nearly $6.5 billion in payments to doctors and teaching hospitals last year, according to the latest figures released on Thursday from a federal database. And physicians or their family members held $1 billion in ownership or investment interest in those companies.”

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“Are Anxiety Drugs Making Us Less Eager To Lend A Helping Hand?”

For the Huffington Post, David Freeman asks “By tamping down anxious feelings, could it be that these so-called “anxiolytic” drugs are blunting our empathy and rendering us less willing to lend a helping hand to those in need?”

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Effects of Exercise on Depression Underestimated, Review Finds

A new meta-analysis finds that the large antidepressant effects of exercise may have been underestimated in previous reviews. This latest report, published this month in the Journal of Psychiatric Research, examines twenty-five previous studies and concludes that regular exercise has a large and significant antidepressant effect in people diagnosed with moderate and severe depression.

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